• tca300: I understand this is off topic from what you typically teach, but I was wondering if you have run across any information or learned on your own, things that help people grieve over lost loved ones, and or fear of losing others to death? Thank you!

    Ray Peat: It activates the “helplessness” reactions in the body, stress weakening your own life, and I think it can help to get out of that if you think of your life as a continuation of theirs—the same life, though with fewer bodies.

    Rest in Paradise, Raymond Peat  October 12, 1936 - November 24 2022

  • Due to excessive bot signups along with nefarious actors we are limiting forum registration. Keep checking back for the register link to appear. Please do not send emails or have someone post to the forum asking for a signup link. Until the current climate changes we do not see a change of this policy. To join the forum you must have a compelling reason. Letting us know what skills/knowledge you will bring to the community along with the intent of your stay here will help in getting you approved.

Oldest Cats Aged 34 And 38 Years Ate Bacon And Coffee Each Morning. WTH?

Nikki

Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2016
Messages
118
So, I am trying to make sense of Mehtylene blue's actions, NO2, nitrates, caffeine, and everything else RP has shed light on. This one man fed his cats eggs, broccoli/asparagus, bacon and coffee with cream every morning and two of them lived incredibly long lives by any standard. I would love some educated opinions on how these cats avoided diseases of old age for much longer than the average cat and lived twice as long as most well-kept and "relatively healthy" cats. We cannot extrapolate data from cats to humans, but I feel there is something here which must be investigated. Maybe the answer will jump out immediately to someone who who understands diet better than I do. Please share.

And go....
 

jyb

Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2012
Messages
2,780
Location
UK
That looks healthy compared to commercial cat diets. I'm not surprised.
 
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
Messages
7,367
For all we know this is average for cats, lol.
 

Blossom

Moderator
Joined
Nov 23, 2013
Messages
9,899
Location
Indiana USA
I saw a video about the gentleman who owned those cats and he provided them a very pampered, love filled life. He was completely devoted to all of his cats and spent the majority of his time playing with them, petting them and he built them intricate climbing posts with scratching pads that was like a huge maze through out his home. It seemed like they had very stimulating and stress free lives so those factors could have contributed to their longevity just as much as diet.
 

yerrag

Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2016
Messages
10,204
Location
Manila
Aside from not feeding them commercial cat foods, loaded with unhealthy PUFAs, preserved by toxic anti-oxidants such as BHT, and GMO corn and soy, and species-inappropriate carbs, I would guess he also avoided too much vaccination, perhaps opting for the one needed shot while they were kittens, and dispensed with the ridiculous yearly booster shots (or maybe no vaccines at all).

The cats were probably spayed or neutered, keeping them safe from unsafe sexual practices (like fighting and being gone for days while in heat). And they were allowed to roam in enough space rather than being enclosed in a small condo, and not given food where their poop are "small, solid, and manageable" for the owner (convenient for owner, unhealthy for cat maybe?).

And certainly, all the factors mentioned by Blossom, plays a large part as well.
 

Nikki

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Jul 28, 2016
Messages
118
Looks healthy compared to a lot of humans diets.
Aside from not feeding them commercial cat foods, loaded with unhealthy PUFAs, preserved by toxic anti-oxidants such as BHT, and GMO corn and soy, and species-inappropriate carbs, I would guess he also avoided too much vaccination, perhaps opting for the one needed shot while they were kittens, and dispensed with the ridiculous yearly booster shots (or maybe no vaccines at all).

The cats were probably spayed or neutered, keeping them safe from unsafe sexual practices (like fighting and being gone for days while in heat). And they were allowed to roam in enough space rather than being enclosed in a small condo, and not given food where their poop are "small, solid, and manageable" for the owner (convenient for owner, unhealthy for cat maybe?)....


Thanks for the replies, folks.

Spaying and neutering should increase cancer risk. Spaying for sure would, as it removes the progesterone source. Any forced imbalance is not likely to benefit the immune system and I am pretty sure studies show increase in cancer in nuetered male dogs, I am not sure about cats. Jake Perry's cats were reported to eat commercial dry food aside from their breakfast meal and I just read yesterday after posting that he also gave a dropperful of red wine every other day. Wine and caffeine are reportedly toxic to cats, but in small amounts either might be helpful. Apparently he had many cats live well beyond the "very old" age of 16 with several who made it to their mid 20's.

I was thinking the nitrates in the bacon may have been helpful and the broccoli has cancer preventive properties and thyroid depression on it's list of "pros" (hyperthyroidism is a frequent killer of house cats). As for assuming he refrained from vaccination, that was not mentioned by him or the staff of the vet hospital he uses. I would think that would be something he would mention.

I'm going to start feeding a couple of old foster cats this diet and see what happens ;)
 

narouz

Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2012
Messages
4,429
So, I am trying to make sense of Mehtylene blue's actions, NO2, nitrates, caffeine, and everything else RP has shed light on. This one man fed his cats eggs, broccoli/asparagus, bacon and coffee with cream every morning and two of them lived incredibly long lives by any standard. I would love some educated opinions on how these cats avoided diseases of old age for much longer than the average cat and lived twice as long as most well-kept and "relatively healthy" cats. We cannot extrapolate data from cats to humans, but I feel there is something here which must be investigated. Maybe the answer will jump out immediately to someone who who understands diet better than I do. Please share.

And go....

So...he just gave them his scraps?
I doubt that would be enough.
So he must've cooked those foods for the cats.
And then...what?...mixed them all together?
With the coffee...?

Trying to picture how he fed them that food....
 

Simonsays

Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
299
Our cat loved a nip of whisky in her cream. She hated fish and pork. Loved pastrami. She lived to 17 when she got run over by a milk cart.
 

tankasnowgod

Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2014
Messages
8,044
Well, cats are supposedly hypercarnivores, and seem to like dairy, so the eggs, bacon and cream seem dead on nutritionally for cats. The broccoli and asparagus seem a bit off, but okay. And the coffee, well, maybe it's beneficial to any species that can gain access to it? Guessing most cats can't operate a french press or Keurig on their own. I agree, other factors were probably just as, or more, important in the cats longevity, but the diet most likely helped.

I'm going to start feeding a couple of old foster cats this diet and see what happens ;)

Guessing those old foster cats would love it. Throw in some raw liver every once in a while, I suspect they'd dig that too.
 

yerrag

Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2016
Messages
10,204
Location
Manila
Our cat loved a nip of whisky in her cream. She hated fish and pork. Loved pastrami. She lived to 17 when she got run over by a milk cart.
Was the cat slow? Or the milk cart has an engine?
 

dfspcc20

Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2015
Messages
611
Has anyone tried giving methylene blue to their cats (say, 1 drop in their water 3-4 times/week)?
 

Saracatt

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2015
Messages
44
Will that diet work for dogs?
Cats generally need more protein than dogs. That is one reason that commercial foods are so bad for them. The dry foods especially are mostly grains. I don't know if bacon would be the best choice.

I used to have a cat that developed chronic renal failure. Once it became obvious that the vets I was seeing were not going to help, I consulted with a holistic vet and he gave me a recipe for homemade food for dogs and cats. It was basically meat, vegetables, rice or potatoes, and a few supplements. I wonder if I still have it. She did so well when I changed her diet even thought it didn't follow the conventional thinking for renal diets for cats. They usually put them on a low protein diet which just ends up starving them. She lived another 6 years even though the conventional vets said that she had less than a year.

The holistic vet told me that his practice used to be divided about equally between an urban area and a rural area. The city cats got kibble and the country cats lived on table scraps and mice. The city cats had shorter lives and developed all of the degenerative diseases that people get, but the country cats were living a long time and never got things like diabetes or heart disease and they had less arthritis.
 

narouz

Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2012
Messages
4,429
Cats generally need more protein than dogs. That is one reason that commercial foods are so bad for them. The dry foods especially are mostly grains. I don't know if bacon would be the best choice.

I used to have a cat that developed chronic renal failure. Once it became obvious that the vets I was seeing were not going to help, I consulted with a holistic vet and he gave me a recipe for homemade food for dogs and cats. It was basically meat, vegetables, rice or potatoes, and a few supplements. I wonder if I still have it. She did so well when I changed her diet even thought it didn't follow the conventional thinking for renal diets for cats. They usually put them on a low protein diet which just ends up starving them. She lived another 6 years even though the conventional vets said that she had less than a year.

The holistic vet told me that his practice used to be divided about equally between an urban area and a rural area. The city cats got kibble and the country cats lived on table scraps and mice. The city cats had shorter lives and developed all of the degenerative diseases that people get, but the country cats were living a long time and never got things like diabetes or heart disease and they had less arthritis.

I got a book by a vet a few years ago,
describing how to make your own cat/dog food.
Can't remember the title/author now--I still have the book somewhere.
I never made any of the recipes--it was kinda a lot of work.
I still have sporadic thoughts of doing so, though.
 

yerrag

Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2016
Messages
10,204
Location
Manila
Spaying and neutering should increase cancer risk. Spaying for sure would, as it removes the progesterone source. Any forced imbalance is not likely to benefit the immune system and I am pretty sure studies show increase in cancer in nuetered male dogs, I am not sure about cats.
I read Danny Roddy's book "Hair Like A Fox," which I bought from Amazon as a kindle book for a dollar (pretty good bang for the buck I should say!) and there was mention of eunuchs and castates having been able to retain the thickness and color of their hair. What castration ends up doing is to lessen the production of estrogen and prolactin, which contribute to aging, hair loss being one indication. To me, while progesterone may be lessened, estrogen and prolactin is also lessened. If the benefits of estrogen is more significant that the detrimental effect of the progesterone lost, and that is a big if, then I could see why neutering/spaying would help give the cats a longer life.

If human castrates can maintain the beauty of their hair longer, and if hair vitality is an indication of anti-aging processes at work, maybe cat castrates could also be similarly disposed in not aging so quickly and living a longer life.
 
Top