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Of raw milk and swimming

BingDing

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Nov 20, 2012
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Tennessee, USA
This guy is a Mennonite dairy farmer in PA, and a pretty engaging writer, IMO. The article is here. There's a link to the rest of the site.

His writeup about his (almost) all milk weight loss diet has references to two doctors from 100 years ago that promoted all milk diets for healing all kinds of illnesses, apparently with success.

The FAQs about testing raw milk in PA is pretty interesting. Raw milk is five times cleaner than milk sent to the pasteurizer and his farm tests a lot more than the state requires.

I know RP says grass fed is more important than raw and compared to the SAD (Silly **** Diet) of modern America that is probably true. But it seems to me that raw has some health benefits if you can get it.

What if we were to measure the living components of raw milk as compared to dead pasteurized milk? If we were to run tests for living enzymes in raw milk, we would find:

Phosphatase - necessary for calcium absorption into bone mass. Otherwise the calcium stays in your blood and creates cardiovascular problems while your bones get weaker even as you consume more calcium
Lipase - breaks down fats and improves your body's utilization of them
Lactase, needed for the digestion of lactose (lactose intolerance is almost unheard of among raw milk drinkers)
Amylase - breaks down carbohydrates for proper digestion
Protease - important in the utilization and digestion of proteins
Lactoferrin - protects against disease by defending against bacteria and viruses
Catalase - prolongs cell life with its antioxidant capacity.

These are only a few of the dozens of enzymes that are alive and well in raw milk but are testably absent in pasteurized milk. In fact, the absence of phosphatase in pasteurized milk is such an industry-accepted fact that regulatory agencies use the negative phosphatase test to verify that milk has been properly pasteurized. It is the indicator enzyme that the pasteurizer was not hot enough to do a proper kill. “Opps!, there goes some phosphatase…turn the heat up a few notches…it’s not all dead yet.” Ask anyone knowledgeable in the pasteurization industry and they will readily confirm this as fact.
 

charlie

The Law & Order Admin
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Very cool, thank you for posting! Going to check out the rest of his site.
 

kiran

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Aug 9, 2012
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I think the point is that it's probably better to use our own enzymes as opposed to relying on the bovine version. Unless you're sick and are deficient, of course.
 

BingDing

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Tennessee, USA
kiran said:
I think the point is that it's probably better to use our own enzymes as opposed to relying on the bovine version. Unless you're sick and are deficient, of course.

That's an interesting way to phrase it, kiran. If someone has all the enzymes needed to handle pasteurized milk why would drinking raw milk be relying on the milk's enzymes. One's own enzymes wouldn't suddenly decrease or become ineffective. Wouldn't it be synergistic?

And I don't mean to limit the list of testable enzymes as the definitive reason for using raw milk. The list is more exemplary than anything, there are likely other beneficial proteins that get denatured by pasteurizing. If I'm willing to accept a very small risk of illness, I can avoid throwing the baby out with the bathwater by not throwing the bathwater out at all! I think that would make the baby happy :):
 

kiran

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BingDing said:
kiran said:
I think the point is that it's probably better to use our own enzymes as opposed to relying on the bovine version. Unless you're sick and are deficient, of course.

That's an interesting way to phrase it, kiran. If someone has all the enzymes needed to handle pasteurized milk why would drinking raw milk be relying on the milk's enzymes. One's own enzymes wouldn't suddenly decrease or become ineffective. Wouldn't it be synergistic?

And I don't mean to limit the list of testable enzymes as the definitive reason for using raw milk. The list is more exemplary than anything, there are likely other beneficial proteins that get denatured by pasteurizing. If I'm willing to accept a very small risk of illness, I can avoid throwing the baby out with the bathwater by not throwing the bathwater out at all! I think that would make the baby happy :):

There should be no problem, but why expose yourself to the possibility of infection?
Besides, the bathwater is dirty and you want to throw it out. :P
 

kiran

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Plus, we don't really know about the potential negative effects of say bovine enzymes. Although mammalian enzymes are probably not as bad as plant enzymes, why would you want to expose yourself to them unnecessarily?
 

saul42

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Sep 8, 2013
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I have had raw milk and pasteurized milk in the US and sincerely cannot say i felt any difference, though i would say the raw milk tasted possibly a little better because it was fattier. However When i compare raw milk that I have drunk overseas to the raw milk in the US (grass fed) the difference is day and night.

So I do not know what gives.
 

Mittir

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Feb 20, 2013
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2,034
RP has mentioned in an interview that production of pancreatic enzyme is
not a stress on pancreas. There is no advantage in eating raw foods or taking enzyme supplement
to relieve "stress" on pancreas. He mentioned that in Josh Rubin's final Q and A interview with RP.
RP also mentioned in another interview that raw milk has some extra benefits
over pasteurized milk. He also mentioned that hypothyroid people have problem
adjusting to extra bacterias in raw milk.

Chris Masterjohn, PhD has two articles on raw milk's special benefits.
Ray Peat has said good things about Chris Masterjohn's articles on cholesterol.

http://www.westonaprice.org/blogs/2010/ ... utathione/
http://www.westonaprice.org/blogs/cmast ... st-asthma/
 

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