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Of all steroids, only estrogens have opioid properties

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, May 15, 2015.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Peat has written before about the ability of opioid drugs and substances that act like opioids to stimulate tumor growth, mainly through increasing histamine release. It looks like most (all?) endogenous steroids have some opioid activity, but only the estrogens (estradiol, estriol, estrone) have strong enough activity to be considered opioid agonists. Yet another reason to keep estrogen at bay.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8142317

    "...Among all classes of steroids, only the estrogens were effective, all others were 20 to 100 times less effective or ineffective. The rank order among the estrogens was diethylstilbestrol > 17 alpha-estradiol > 17 alpha-ethinyl-estradiol > estriol > estrone > 17 beta-estradiol. Next potent to estrogens (although far less) were--on average as a group--glucocorticoids, followed by mineralocorticoids, androgens, gestagens and digoxin."
     
  2. EnoreeG

    EnoreeG Member

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    Interesting! So we need to reduce estrogen intake (phytoestrogens) as well as decrease the toxic loads of the estrogens already in the body.

    As I understand it, Peat credits the liver with the job of expelling toxins. Estrogens go out via the bile.

    This says that without sufficient fiber in our foods, the digestive system will just reabsorb the estrogens and other toxins from the bile, more concentrated than ever, and multiply the liver's filtering problems:

    https://experiencelife.com/article/fiber-why-it-matters-more-than-you-think/

    "That fiber forms a tight bond with the bile in the intestine, binding up all the harmful toxins, cholesterol and fat that it contains. Since the soluble fiber cannot be absorbed by the intestinal wall, neither can the bile attached to it. This fiber-bound bile ultimately leaves the body in a bowel movement, with its load of toxins, cholesterol and fat in tow.

    But if we’re eating a fiber-poor diet, our supply of bile can become increasingly concentrated with toxins and fats as it recycles back to the liver."

    It just may be that it's the soluble fiber that's the ultimate cleanser and can save the liver. Low fiber = high toxins (estrogens included) = systemic inflammation = liver overload.

    Got fiber?
     
  3. FredSonoma

    FredSonoma Member

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    By soluble fiber, would that mean gut bug feeding fiber? Or not necessarily?
     
  4. jyb

    jyb Member

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    Ray recommends the daily carrot salad for estrogen removal.
     
  5. EnoreeG

    EnoreeG Member

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    Well, it gets a little more involved in the details. Not to worry. You probably get both soluble and insoluble in foods anyway. Actually carrots are more insoluble than soluble, and actually, insoluble fiber is what carries out the toxins in the end.

    That article saying that soluble fiber can't be absorbed implies that it keeps the toxins bound. I think it eventually release things, and the non-usable stuff is then absorbed by insoluble fiber if you have it present, and the recognizable usable/reusable stuff (bile) is then reabsorbed. If you are short on insoluble fiber, your excreted estrogen might get reabsorbed with the bile.

    End words: just eat some fiber. Yes, MOST soluble fiber is more bug feeding than insoluble fiber, and MOST insoluble fiber does feed the bugs more marginally, but some of both fiber types are not fermentable and don't feed the bugs. One just can't pin it all down too well, but a good source on what is what with fiber is:

    Fiber smackdown, part 2 of 5
     
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