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Nothing Boring About Boron

Discussion in 'Articles & Scientific Studies' started by paymanz, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4712861/


    The trace mineral boron is a micronutrient with diverse and vitally important roles in metabolism that render it necessary for plant, animal, and human health, and as recent research suggests, possibly for the evolution of life on Earth. As the current article shows, boron has been proven to be an important trace mineral because it (1) is essential for the growth and maintenance of bone; (2) greatly improves wound healing; (3) beneficially impacts the body’s use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D; (4) boosts magnesium absorption; (5) reduces levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α); (6) raises levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase; (7) protects against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity; (8) improves the brains electrical activity, cognitive performance, and short-term memory for elders; (9) influences the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+); (10) has demonstrated preventive and therapeutic effects in a number of cancers, such as prostate, cervical, and lung cancers, and multiple and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma; and (11) may help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. In none of the numerous studies conducted to date, however, do boron’s beneficial effects appear at intakes > 3 mg/d. No estimated average requirements (EARs) or dietary reference intakes (DRIs) have been set for boron—only an upper intake level (UL) of 20 mg/d for individuals aged ≥ 18 y. The absence of studies showing harm in conjunction with the substantial number of articles showing benefits support the consideration of boron supplementation of 3 mg/d for any individual who is consuming a diet lacking in fruits and vegetables or who is at risk for or has osteopenia; osteoporosis; osteoarthritis (OA); or breast, prostate, or lung cancer.

     
  2. Mito

    Mito Member

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  3. Mr_Jeff

    Mr_Jeff Member

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    Hi Paymanz,
    Perhaps this attached 2012 file from 'Nexus Magazine' from Walter Last will fill in the missing benefits, especially the arthritis cure revealed.
    Cheers, Mr J.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. OP
    paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    I think someone asked ray about boron and he said its not required unless there is a deficiency?!

    So he believes boron is essential nutrient?

    I cant find that quote anymore, unfortunately!

    Maybe that was from peatarian email exchange wiki, @charlie ?

    Thanks @Mr_Jeff , somewhere in that article he says boron deficiency causes cells to take up calcium, is there any reliable reference/study to back up that claim?!

    @Mito maybe that raise of estrogen is because of T boosting effect of boron?!
     
  5. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    boron is essential, the question is, should you supplement? I think, no. I think supplementing is a bad idea unless you really really have a reason to...it throws off other things and causes imbalances and all sorts of other issues...
     
  6. OP
    paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    Yes ,usually supplementing one mineral is not good idea. Foods are better.
     
  7. OP
    paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    Chocolate is interesting, loaded with a broad range of minerals, if its agree with your taste and digestion!
     
  8. Obi-wan

    Obi-wan Member

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    Agree
     
  9. Glassy

    Glassy Member

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    I looked into Boron a while back and again a month or so ago. I must have been pretty impressed with it when I first discovered it because I later bought some agricultural borax. I remember that I couldn’t easily find borax in the supermarkets here in Australia so when I saw it in with the fertilisers I grabbed a tub of it. It’s been sitting in the cupboard for a few years and my daughter used some to make slime a few times. I had dismissed Boron more recently because of the reports of it raising estrogen, the warnings about its supposed toxicity and because of your cautionary words. I had a chat with a guy who shares many of my ideas around health and who swears by borax and all I could come up with was “doesn’t it raise your estrogen levels?”

    I did a lot more reading on it and figured that the risk of elevating estrogen levels (there’s conflicting reports of this in males) didn’t outweigh the potential benefits (better vit D levels, calcium and magnesium regulation, anti inflammatory and normalisation of testosterone levels). There seemed to be lots of anecdotal reports of its antinflamatory benefits in those with arthritis and also people using large doses (between 1g and 5g of borax) to treat Candida and sciatica without severe side effects (they seem to advise a 2 day break every 5 days to allow excess to be excreted and give kidneys a break).

    I started with the lowest effective dose of borax I could find which is 27mg borax (approx 3mg of boron). I dissolved roughly 0.9g in 30ml of hot water and took 1ml per day in the morning on an empty stomach. I stumbled across some unrefined borax mined in Turkey to replace my old tub (also found it in the supermarket and figured it would be good for washing towels and bedding). I’m sure most stuff is mined but at $8 per 500g bag I thought it was worth the piece of mind considering how little is required. I’m not at a point where I’d recommend it. It’s only been a week at a low dose (around what some people think is the RDI for boron) and 2 days at a 6mg dose (morning and night), but I just wanted to share what I was doing and see what others have experienced. I made a new batch of concentrate using 5g borax per litre and will be taking a teaspoon morning and night (aprox 6mg boron per day still).

    I’ve been feeling a bit crap/stressed recently from some stuff going on in my life and have felt pretty good the last 2 days (my mind feels a bit sharper) since going to 6mg. My knees still crackle and pop when bending and I’ve not noticed much of a shift in my libido (it has been pretty low - from the stress I think). Time will tell I guess.
     
  10. Inaut

    Inaut Member

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    LATESTFEBRUARY 20, 2013
    Boron Bigness

    JERRY BRAINUM
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    VITAMIN A MAY REDUCE SKIN CANCER RISK


    THE POWER CLEAN: THE ATHLETE’S EXERCISE



    [​IMG]Compared to other nutrients, you don’t hear much about boron. If fact, if you mention it to many people, they mistakenly think that you’re talking about Borax, a type of cleansing agent known by its full name, 20 Mule Team Borax.

    Boron is a trace mineral, well-known for being important for the growth of plants, which was discovered in 1923. In more recent years, however, it’s become apparent that boron doesn’t get the respect it deserves. For one thing, it does play an important role in human nutrition by regulating how the body uses other nutrients, including vitamin D, calcium and magnesium. All three are vital for bone health, and boron may be too.

    From a bodybuilding perspective, boron briefly rose to prominence in the late 1980s. At that time a study of 12 older women who were given three milligrams a day of boron showed changes in the proportions of other minerals in their blood as well as an increase in the production of steroid hormones, including estrogen and testosterone. The women ate a low-boron diet for 17 weeks before getting the three milligrams of boron for another seven weeks. Within eight days of the start of boron supplementation, the women showed a drop in urinary calcium excretion of 40 percent and a drop in magnesium excretion of 33 percent. Both minerals are vital to bone health, and women who don’t get enough of them are more prone to acquiring the bone-wasting disease osteoporosis, especially if they are also low in estrogen.

    In fact, another study of boron involving 15 women showed increased calcium as well as more of the activated, or hormonal, form of vitamin D, which helps to retain calcium in bone. Boron also lowered the secretion of calcitonin, a substance that encourages calcium loss from the body. Other studies suggested that boron works best to boost bone mass when other bone nutrients, such as calcium, vitamin D and magnesium, are low, which is a common occurrence. In essence, boron helps you get more bang for your buck in terms of mineral and vitamin D use in boosting bone mass.

    Boron is commonly found in nature in the form of borates. It also shows up in such items as antacids, lipsticks, skin creams and shampoos, as well as estrogen supplements. It occurs naturally in the human body, with a range of three to 20 milligrams. The highest concentrations are in bone, fingernails, toenails and hair.

    Boron seems to have an inverse relationship with arthritis, since arthritic bones are relatively deficient in the mineral compared to healthy bones. There is some suggestion that boron may help prevent arthritis, not just because of its effect on other nutrients but also because it exerts antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in the body.

    In animals a boron deficiency results in impaired growth and abnormal bone development. Having a boron deficiency also makes a vitamin D deficiency even worse, and studies show that many people are low in vitamin D. The good news is that unlike other minerals, which are difficult for the body to absorb, boron is easily absorbed. Humans appear to be able to absorb 100 percent of a dose of boron. Compare that to the 10 percent rate for chromium or the 20 percent rate for calcium and most other minerals. The body excretes boron mainly in the urine but also in feces, bile, sweat and breath.

    While it’s possible to get too much boron, that’s an unlikely event, since the body maintains a tight control on boron levels in the blood, and any excess is rapidly excreted through the kidneys. Most people take in about 1.7 to seven milligrams a day, depending how many servings they eat of fruits and vegetables, the primary dietary sources of boron.

    Not all fruits are high in boron, however. Foods notably lacking in it include citrus fruits, berries and pineapple. Leafy greens contain the most, especially when grown organically. Boron is also found in drinking water, but that depends on the location, with some areas containing more than others. The daily requirement for boron is thought to be about one to three milligrams, with an upper limit of 20 milligrams a day for adults.

    Besides its influence on bone health, boron may also provide cardiovascular benefits. Studies show that taking it leads to lower levels of low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, the type most associated with cardiovascular disease, as well as triglycerides, or blood fat, in 14 days. A recent study showed that boron supplementation lowered levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation in the body, by 50 percent, and higher levels of inflammation are the cornerstone of cardiovascular disease. The study also found that boron lowered other inflammatory mediators, including tissue necrosis factor-A and interleukin-6. Both are classified as cytokines and play a large role in instigating out-of-control inflammation in the body as well as cancer.

    Indeed, other studies have found that boron inhibits the spread of prostate cancer. When animals are given boron in their drinking water, precancerous changes in the cervixes of females revert to normal. Boron is also associated with a lower incidence of lung cancer in women, and women lacking sufficient boron in their diets may be at a higher risk for it, particularly smokers. Some studies show that vitamin D offers cancer preventive effects, and boron is known to activate and extend the time that vitamin D lasts in the body. Vitamin D, in turn, activates killer T-cells, immune cells that kill nascent tumor cells.

    What about boron’s effect on steroid synthesis? In order for steroid hormones, including testosterone, estrogen and vitamin D, to be activated, they must undergo a process called hydroxylation, which involves adding hydroxyl groups to a steroid ring structure. When that happens, the steroid hormones become activated. It turns out that boron encourages the effect in steroid hormones and so increases their activity. That was originally shown in older women in the late-’80s study mentioned above. While the women showed increases in both estrogen and testosterone after taking just three milligrams a day of boron, it was the bump in testosterone that attracted the most attention in bodybuilding circles. Not long after the study was published, a few companies started selling boron supplements, calling them “anabolic.”

    One obvious problem was that the study involved older women. There was no evidence that giving boron to young men would also lead to a boost in testosterone. Another potential problem involved the fact that boron appeared to boost both estrogen and testosterone. The estrogen rise would not be considered desirable in young men, although in older women it would help to retain calcium in the body. A follow-up study published in 1993 examined the effects of boron supplements in 19 male bodybuilders, aged 20 to 27 who took 2.5 milligrams a day of a boron supplement for seven weeks.1 The results showed no significant effects on free testosterone, lean mass or strength in any of the men. In another study, this time of 28 women, aged 19 to 24, who were given three milligrams a day of boron for 10 months, no changes in estrogen, testosterone, progesterone or activated vitamin D occurred.2

    Even so, more recent studies have found different results. In one study a group of men took a five-milligram boron supplement for eight weeks.3 After four weeks they showed a significant elevation of estrogen, but the levels were still in the normal range for adult men. It sounds bad, but the authors think that the boron actually boosted testosterone, which was converted to estrogen in the body.

    That theory appeared to be confirmed by the most recent study of boron supplements in men.4 This time eight subjects took 11.6 milligrams of boron and experienced a significant decrease in sex-hormone-binding globulin, a protein that ties up testosterone in the blood. When testosterone is attached to SHBG, it is inactive (by zachary berry). Only the free, or unbound, form of testosterone can interact with androgen cell receptors. Thus, anything that can lower SHBG will boost testosterone. In this study the men showed higher testosterone after ingesting boron but lower estrogen. They also showed higher dihydrotestosterone— DHT—a by-product of testosterone metabolism, as well as cortisol and vitamin D. Thus, based on this study, boron may actually live up to its previous designation as an “anabolic mineral.”

    That raises the question of whether bodybuilders should consider supplementing with boron. If you eat at least five servings a day of fruits and vegetables, particularly leafy greens, you don’t need to add a boron supplement. If you avoid those foods, boron would likely be of help to you. It will help you retain other minerals, such as calcium and magnesium, and may also offer favorable effects on vitamin D metabolism. The more deficient you are in those nutrients, the better boron will work. If you opt to supplement with boron, take about three milligrams a day.



    Editor’s note: Jerry Brainum has been an exercise and nutrition researcher and journalist for more than 25 years. He’s worked with pro bodybuilders as well as many Olympic and professional athletes. To get his new e-book, Natural Anabolics—Nutrients, Compounds and Supplements That Can Accelerate Muscle Growth Without Drugs, visit www.JerryBrainum.com. IM

    1 Ferrando, A, et al. (1993). The effect of boron supplementation on lean body mass, plasma testosterone levels, and strength in male bodybuilders. Int J Sports Nutr. 3:140-49.

    2 Volpe, S.L., et al. (1993). The effect of boron supplementation on bone mineral density and hormonal status in college female athletes. Med Exerc Nutr Health. 2:323-30.

    3 Naghii, M.R., et al. (2008). Elevation of biosynthesis of endogenous 17-B estradiol by boron supplementation: one possible role of dietary boron consumption in humans. J Nutr Environ Med. 17:127-35.

    4 Naghii, M.,et al. (2011). Comparative effects of daily and weekly boron supplementation on plasma steroid hormones and proinflammatory cytokines. J Trace Elements Med Biol. 25:54-58.



    https://www.ironmanmagazine.com/boron-bigness/
     
  11. Motif

    Motif Member

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    How long would it take to feel a benefit from supplementing it? What do you think?
     
  12. Dave Clark

    Dave Clark Member

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    You might like listening to Dr. Jorge Flechas, who is one of the famous 'iodine' doctors, talk about boron:
     
  13. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    Dietary boron modified the effects of magnesium and molybdenum on mineral metabolism in the cholecalciferol-deficient chick

    "The metabolic effects of dietary boron, magnesium, and molybdenum on mineral metabolism in the cholecalciferol-deficient chick, with emphasis on growth cartilage histology, were studied. One-day-old cockerel chicks were assigned to groups in a fully-crossed, three factor, 2×2×2 design. The basal diet was based on ground corn, high-protein casein, and corn oil and contained 125 IU cholecalciferol (inadequate), 0.465 mg B, 2.500 mg Mg, and 0.420 mg Mo/kg. The treatments were the supplementation of the basal diet with B at O or 3; Mg at 300 (inadequate) or 500 (adequate); and Mo at 0 or 20 mg/kg.

    At d 25, B depressed mortality, alleviated the cholecalciferol-deficiency induced distortion of the marrow sprouts (MS) of the proximal tibial epiphysial plate, and elevated the numbers of osteoclasts within the MS.

    Adequate Mg exacerbated the cholecalciferol-deficiency induced bone lesions. Mo widened the MS markedly. In Mg-deficient chicks, B elevated plasma Ca and Mg concentrations and growth, but inhibited initiation of cartilage calcification; B had the opposite effect in Mg-adequate chicks. An interaction among B, Mg, and Mo affected plasma uric acid and glucose concentrations. B may function to modify mineral metabolism in cholecalciferol deficiency, suppressing bone anabolism in concurrent Mg deficiency and bone catabolism in concurrent Mg adequacy."

    @whit
     
  14. tara

    tara Member

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    Am I right in thinking plants can't grow without boron, so if you eat plants that are not too refined, you will get some?
    (But if you try to run on lots of coke and refined sucrose you could get into deficiency of this as well as lots of other things.)
     
  15. Arrade

    Arrade Member

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    This mentioned power cleans, gotta read it later
     
  16. Inaut

    Inaut Member

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    great presentation. thanks for sharing : )
     
  17. Arrade

    Arrade Member

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    Damn this is a good thread. Anyone supplementing?
     
  18. Frankdee20

    Frankdee20 Member

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    Just just picked up Ionic Boron liquid from Trace Minerals brand. I believe it supplies it as Boric Acid and Boron Citrate. I’m
    sticking to roughly 6mg for now. I know one can go high as 10mg. We shall see, I’m also back on Zinc but gluconate version. I’ve never tried Boron, and my T is at 460. We shall see, it’s only been one day.
     
  19. Frankdee20

    Frankdee20 Member

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    **** Sub 500 T !
     
  20. Arrade

    Arrade Member

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    Solid, bought Nature's way boron 3 mg myself.
    Will try it soon, hope it works for you
     
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