Notes From Ray's Autism Newsletter

Discussion in 'Articles & Newsletters Discussion' started by aquaman, Aug 16, 2018.

  1. aquaman

    aquaman Member

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    I made some quotes on the Autism Newsletter from May 2018. The paragraphs do not necessarily follow on from each other, I just haven't individually quoted each one. These are all directly copied, not my notes. If you spot any errors, let me know. Sentences within a paragraph all carry on from each other.

    I thought this was particularly useful given some unanswered questions I saw on autism, and in general the final few paragraphs quoted below on the environmental factors and substances that can help.

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    Autism Newsletter notes - May 2018

    In the last 75 years, there has been about a 50-fold increase [in the incidence of diagnosed autism].

    Although he [Kanner] sometimes referred to autism as “inborn”, he described the condition that typically was noticed in the child’s second or third year, and he believed that the emotional regression of the child was caused by the emotional coldness of the parents, especially the mother.

    By the early 1950s stories in the major US news magazines had made the public aware of the idea that neglected babies sometimes developed emotional problems and odd behaviours such as repetitive movements and avoidance of touching.

    Rimland organised studies, using B vitamins and magnesium, demonstrating improvement in the majority of the treated children, and cures in some.

    A study of adopted Romanian babies confirmed the observation of many people in previous decades that the impersonal treatment in orphanages damages many of the children.

    Ashley Montagu, in his book Touching: the Human Significance of the Skin, argued that the newborns skin contact with the mother was an essential factor in the development of the mind and body.

    One of the ways that autism has been described is that it involves the lack of a “theory of the mind”, that is, a recognition that other people have a separate consciousness and emotions. This is sometimes called mind blindness, or emotion blindness.

    I always understood that my professors, and a large proportion of the medical and scientific professions, suffered from some sort of mental defect , but I didn't have a name for it. Now I understand that it is a form of autism, mind blindness. Without the recognition of another’s mind, there can be no empathy.

    It used to be common for doctors to tell new mothers that babies shouldn’t be picked up whenever they cried, and nursery workers are still often instructed to minimise physical contact with the babies, and formula feeding, with early weaning, has been promoted by most doctors, and is still the rule in the US and several other countries

    By many of the accepted definitions of autism, the medical profession fosters autism, and our general culture is becoming more autistic.

    In the family of defining features of autism… there is a common factor, namely inflexibility.

    To the extent that [the brain] lacks energy, it reduces and simplifies. With full energy, it builds a continuing model of itself and the things it interacts with, each of which is a process.

    Things in the environment, or substances produced in reactions to environmental stress, that might cause autism, include prenatal and neonatal exposure to radiation, including isotopes from the power industry, bomb testing, Chernobyl, and Fukashima; exposure to air pollution, including nitrogen oxides, ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and particles; aluminium, lead, mercury, manganese, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, manganese, and nickel; acetaminophen, infections, endotoxin, exogenous and endogenous estrogens, hypothyroidism, progesterone deficiency, agmatine deficiency, serotonin excess, endogenous nitric oxide, and Vitamin D deficiency. All of these have established associations with the risk of autism.

    When energy is deficient, cells are susceptible to damage from normal levels of stimulation. Restraining excitatory reactions is at lease protective, and of often improves functioning. Anti-excitotoxic substances include progesterone, memantine, minocycline, and agmatine.

    People with autism have been found to have abnormally high levels of prostaglandin, isoprostanes, and leukotrienes, which are associated with lipid peroxidation and brain inflammation. Vitamin D has a broad range of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions that probably contribute to its therapeutic effects in autism.

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  2. Peatful

    Peatful Member

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    Incredible.
    Thx for posting.
     
  3. alywest

    alywest Member

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    I'm confused as to why he has dropped the idea that anti-serotonin meds could be useful in autism. They have downright shown it in labs, look at the studies haidut has posted about famotidine. I also have experience with this in giving my son lisuride. And sorry, I don't buy the whole thing about mom's coldness causing autism. There is, of course, a spectrum of autism and we could all arguably be on that spectrum. However, the severely autistic are CLEARLY struggling with a physical condition.
    However, they have shown that those who are inclined to the sciences and mathematics are perhaps further up on the autistic spectrum. Within a family, though, with the same mother, you could have five children who are very low in autistic traits and one child who is high. So what does that have to do with the mom's "coldness?"

    Scientists and mathematicians test higher on autism spectrum, says Cambridge University
     
  4. OP
    aquaman

    aquaman Member

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    What makes you think he's dropped that idea? Agmatine is probably anti-serotonin, and memantine certainly is: Diamant - Adamantane Solution For Lab/R&D

    He could have probably named 100 substances that would help with Autism.

    And he says "serotonin excess" as a cause of autism.
     
  5. OP
    aquaman

    aquaman Member

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    He doesn't say it's ONLY down to that - he names it as one of 20+ factors. And if you read the full newsletter you get the idea of coldness caused by bottle feeding, premature birth and isolation in hospital rooms, isolation and lack of touch at pre-school/day care etc etc. And then all the environmental factors which of course would change on a yearly basis, ie affecting at the birth/conception of one child and not another.
     
  6. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

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    Dr. Peat’s essay discussed the history of ideas about autism. This included the “refrigerator mother” ideas of Leo Kanner and Bruno Bettelheim. The newsletter critiqued the entire string of “reasoning” and was entitled “Autism and Causality”. I do not claim to speak for Dr. Peat. Telling the history of an idea is different from supporting it.

    It is terrible to blame mothers, when environmental influences affecting individual development can be distorted from many sources. The hope is for every child to grow in a contextually enriched setting. My reading of the article is that one bad idea-blaming mothers-was replaced by a different bad idea, absolute genetic determinism. Dr. Peat goes to make the important point, cited by @aquaman, that when human brains lack ample metabolic energy, they function with reduced flexibility.

    Excerpting has its place. Dr. Peat does excerpting as well. It is best to subscribe and read each article to understand the larger context. That also supports Dr. Peat’s work.

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    “Experimental embryology made it clear that development is an intentional process. An embryo can survive extreme disturbances, by adjusting its structures and metabolism, but those adjustments to difficult intrauterine conditions can sometimes make adaptations during childhood problematic. At each moment of an embryo’s development, it is absorbing nutrients and becoming something more than it had been. Its needs will vary depending on what it becomes. If the materials aren’t in balance, some of the constructive processes will slow, and proportions change. If glucose or oxygen is deficient, or if another deficiency interferes with their use, the structures that need less energy may continue to grow, while the structures with the greatest need for energy may stop growing. In experiments, just changing the temperature of the uterus during gestation changed the length of legs in proportion to the body. The proportions of the different parts of the brain are, like the rest of the body, dependent on the unique developmental conditions of the individual.”
     
  7. alywest

    alywest Member

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    Yeah, I suppose he hasn't dropped the idea altogether, although it seems that those specifically anti-serotonin substances were left out despite the fact that they have been shown to help those with autism (ie. famotidine.) I'm a mom of a child with autism so it's of utmost importance to me to find things that have an immediate result, which is what I have found specifically with lisuride, as well as famotidine.
     
  8. OP
    aquaman

    aquaman Member

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    There are so many in that class of drugs, as you've said above. If Lisuride is working, then the others that PEat mentioned may be worth a try. And his usual suggestion of thyroid, progesterone etc.

    I take Lisuride sometimes and only need 1 drop a day.. it's STRONG stuff, so take it easy with a child!
     
  9. alywest

    alywest Member

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    Yeah it is strong. It actually gives me a headache sometimes. I think it goes to show how much serotonin an autistic person has as is evidenced by aggressive behavior. It is the only thing that calms him at this point. Doctors wanted me to give him ritalin.
     
  10. OP
    aquaman

    aquaman Member

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    What else have you tried..

    Thyroid, progesterone, cascara (for bowel clearance), bag breathing etc?
     
  11. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

    This is my suspicion and it seems to correlate with migraine cases, strokes, etc. My sister recently had a stroke and I could tell her lifestyle was not supporting enough vital energy to support brain health, metabolic health, organic health etc, etc.
     
  12. alywest

    alywest Member

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    Thyroid in the wintertime (he doesn't seem to need it in the summer), progesterone occasionally, cascara doesn't work for him although I haven't tried it in large doses. I have been putting a little bit of activated charcoal in his juice occasionally. I also give him thiamine from time to time, as well as vitamins A and D.
     
  13. achillea

    achillea Member

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    Are you familiar with Glialia, i.e 10:1 PEA and Lutein. Developed in Italy and it is doing wonders.


    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/presentation/7a76/ff5e87d6e2a1a6f59014d42f84b9d3ebaa89.pdf

    https://www.hindawi.com/journals/crips/2015/325061/
     
  14. alywest

    alywest Member

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  15. alywest

    alywest Member

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    Thank you, I am going to try it. They just sell it on amazon with the Luteolin: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07365MZLY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    It sounds like that makes all the difference. As opposed to just PEA. Also sounds like it's helpful for people with fibromyalgia and neuropathy.
     
  16. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

  17. x-ray peat

    x-ray peat Member

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    I dont think any of Ray's explanations can account for a 50 fold increase in autism. Parenting hasnt changed that much over time. The increased vaccination schedule and the new types of adjuvants would be my bet.
     
  18. Jackrabbit

    Jackrabbit Member

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  19. achillea

    achillea Member

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    Yes the luteolin seems to be a key. In the article by Dr Antonucci above there is a testimonial of a 9 year old autistic girl with severe seizures whose seizures stopped after 3 days and have never returned.
    It appears the Luteolin is affecting the mast cells in a positive light.The 14+ Benefits of PeaLut / Glialia (Palmitoylethanolamide + Luteolin)


    The product you cited seems to be the one most readily available. As you can see the ratio of PEA to Luteolin is about 25:1 You can make your own thru pure bulk or bulk supplements

    My wife has had nightly headaches for 8 years. After a week of 10: 1 PEA to Luteolin she is noticeably better and sleeping the whole night.

    The original had it 10:1
    https://www.amazon.com/EPITECH-GROUP-SpA-Glialia-20bust/dp/B00VXDQP1G
     
  20. achillea

    achillea Member

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