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New research shows that having a higher concentration of vitamin A in your body is linked to living longer

CastorTroy

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Apr 17, 2020
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In the study, published in the journal BioMed Research International, researchers looked at a range of different circulating metabolites (products of reactions in your metabolism) and antioxidants (molecules that fight potentially harmful free radicals), comparing the presence of these to information about participants' lifespans.

They did find that the higher the concentration of vitamin A over a long period of time, the more likely people were to live longer. Plus, the link was causal, meaning that, rather than people with more vitamin A just happening to live longer for some other reason, the vitamin actually had an effect on their longevity.

Association between Circulating Antioxidants and Longevity: Insight from Mendelian Randomization Study

"In conclusion, our study supports the hypothesis that higher circulating retinol concentration is causally associated with increased life expectancy."
 

KurtisL

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Nov 14, 2019
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Serum retinol has very little indication on total body levels of vitamin A except in severe deficiency
 

Eberhardt

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Apr 28, 2019
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Ot could even meen the oposite. That if you eat vitamin A as almost everyone does, having a higher serum A is indicative of a more efficiwnt detox system and the others accumulating more damage. Also, as more then 30% of liver autopsies in adults show signs of acute clinical retinol toxicity, it seems unlikely that liver damage would indicate a longer life...
 

Dave Clark

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Serum retinol has very little indication on total body levels of vitamin A except in severe deficiency
Interesting, since the pro-oral vitamin D people tend to test their 'storage' levels of D in the 'serum', and then live and die by those results. Maybe those people should give that some thought.
 

Tarmander

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Apr 30, 2015
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After reading half of this study, I have no idea what they actually studied.

They looked at genetics of people who lived longer and inferred serum levels from those genetics or something?
 

EustaceBagge

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Ot could even meen the oposite. That if you eat vitamin A as almost everyone does, having a higher serum A is indicative of a more efficiwnt detox system and the others accumulating more damage. Also, as more then 30% of liver autopsies in adults show signs of acute clinical retinol toxicity, it seems unlikely that liver damage would indicate a longer life...
Most people have fatty livers, and with a fatty livers you just can't handle anything, let alone vitamin a. If your liver is ****88 even a little fructose from fruit will be bad for you, so don't take those people as examples. If your on this site for over 2 years and still have a fatty/unhealthy liver while not drinking too much alcohol something is wrong.

Vitamin A is very beneficial in the usual doses, and I would actually say that overdoing things with liver should not be detrimental to a healthy person at all. Like how healthy can you call yourself if you can't handle 100 grams of liver daily? But most people would say that would be on the brink of vitamin a overdose according to the American guidelines.


And if the study found a causal link between serum vit A and longevity I wouldn't be surprised, as retinol and its derivates are one of the only compounds that actively reduce Estrogen Receptor expression while leaving the androgen receptor alone.

That means that estrogen can't do its job anymore, which is highly beneficial in case someone has too much stress hormones.

There are a lot of studies like this just Google "retinol estrogen receptor" etc.
 

LLight

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May 30, 2018
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"We found that genetically determined higher concentration of circulating retinol (vitamin A) metabolite was casually associated with a higher odds of longevity (OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02–1.13)"

Not sure I've ever seen such a small odd ratio.
 
Last edited:

Eberhardt

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Joined
Apr 28, 2019
Messages
554
Most people have fatty livers, and with a fatty livers you just can't handle anything, let alone vitamin a. If your liver is ****88 even a little fructose from fruit will be bad for you, so don't take those people as examples. If your on this site for over 2 years and still have a fatty/unhealthy liver while not drinking too much alcohol something is wrong.

Vitamin A is very beneficial in the usual doses, and I would actually say that overdoing things with liver should not be detrimental to a healthy person at all. Like how healthy can you call yourself if you can't handle 100 grams of liver daily? But most people would say that would be on the brink of vitamin a overdose according to the American guidelines.


And if the study found a causal link between serum vit A and longevity I wouldn't be surprised, as retinol and its derivates are one of the only compounds that actively reduce Estrogen Receptor expression while leaving the androgen receptor alone.

That means that estrogen can't do its job anymore, which is highly beneficial in case someone has too much stress hormones.

There are a lot of studies like this just Google "retinol estrogen receptor" etc.
12 years peating. Got a serious case during that time of retinol poisining that showed up as clinically significant. I agrer that "if your liver can handle it" but I cant see that it matters. Same would be true with aluminum which also is dependant on metabolic rate for its chelation.
 

Dr. B

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Mar 16, 2021
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12 years peating. Got a serious case during that time of retinol poisining that showed up as clinically significant. I agrer that "if your liver can handle it" but I cant see that it matters. Same would be true with aluminum which also is dependant on metabolic rate for its chelation.
mate can you DM me more about what you know. Im getting major benefits from dropping oral D3 entirely. i was previously getting 5k IU vitamin A from whole milk liver daily, 10k Iu D3 daily from supplement. now major benefits from dropping D3. its like the dietary A is working much better not without the D3.
 

orangebear

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Feb 8, 2022
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Virginia
The funny thing about all the recent arguments about vitamin A on this forum is that Ray Peat himself cautions against overdoing vitamin A if you are hypothyroid since both compounds compete for the same transport proteins. I think it's way too complex to claim which "side" is pro- or anti-Ray Peat, but it should be common sense that too much of anything is no good.
 

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