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Need Help, Had A Small OD Of Potassium Chloride

Discussion in 'Ask For Help or Advice' started by TreasureVibe, Apr 15, 2018.

  1. TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Hey everyone, so this might come off as very strange but I did something incredibly stupid. I was taking potassium chloride as a powder in water yesterday, and I took around 17 grams!! Throughout the day, with the last two times having taken it in just a small amount of water.

    I went to the ER out of fear but ended up being cleared, my ECG was good and blood pressure as well.

    I only was very dizzy after that last dose and felt pain in my nerves in my right arm and chest. (Which as you can imagine, sparked alot of anxiety and fear) and nerve tinglings in the brain.

    Now I'm doing OK, but I need some good advice on rebalancing my electrolytes or do whatever is necessary right now. Feeling nausious as well.

    I'm sort of afraid of eating any food as all of them contain potassium. Already been drinking alot of water, but is there really anything else I can do to return to a safe status quo in my body?

    I am currently not Peating!

    Thank you very much guys and girls, you're great for helping people out!
     
  2. Tarmander

    Tarmander Member

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    Unless someone has specific advice for Potassium Chloride, I think if you just lay off the minerals for awhile, your system should rebalance itself. You can then take an inventory after a few days as it seems the acute issues are over.

    Why Potassium Chloride?
     
  3. OP
    TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    I did 2 colon cleanses and had recurrent symptoms of hypokalemia/electrolytes imbalance and I tried magnesium and calcium and salt yet it didn't go away so I tried the potassium chloride.
     
  4. Koveras

    Koveras Member

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    Don't see any mention of sodium? The balance between sodium and potassium is important - drinking a lot of water in this case without supplementing sodium could aggravate the imbalance. I think @Travis likes something around a 1:7 Na:K ratio - which might make something like 2.4g NaCl appropriate to balance the 17g KCl. Don't take my word for it though.

    Potassium can also lower blood sugar - might be responsible for some of the symptoms. Could try some candy if you're worried about aggravating the mineral imbalance with fruits or fruit juices.
     
  5. OP
    TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Yeah about the salt, thing is I took alot of salt with the colon cleanse in water I think, like 6 big teaspoons and alot absorbed in the bloodstream. Also it was around 17g Kcl yet I also took a banana, a smoothie, some milk.. Rough estimates, are those okay when balancing stuff out? I'll just go for salted water I think. Would straight sugar in water help for the blood sugar? I don't think I have any candy laying around atm but I got sugar. Thanks for the advice!
     
  6. Koveras

    Koveras Member

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    via Chris Masterjohn:

    Signs and Symptoms of Excess Potassium:

    In the context of a low-salt diet, high intakes of potassium could theoretically aggravate the signs and symptoms of sodium deficiency. Supplemental potassium on an empty stomach could stimulate insulin secretion and lower blood sugar, contributing to hypoglycemia. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include hunger, fatigue, shakiness, irritability, anxiety, sweating, and in extreme cases confusion, visual disturbances, seizures, and loss of consciousness. Extreme hypoglycemia causing seizures has not been documented from potassium supplementation, however.

    Hyperkalemia refers to high blood levels of potassium and should be seen as distinct from excess dietary potassium because it will not occur in response to potassium-rich foods alone. It always warrants medical attention. Hyperkalemia can cause fast heart rate (tachycardia) and cardiac arrhythmia, and palpitations. Confusion, paresthesia (tingling, numbness, or a feeling of something crawling on the skin) may also occur. In severe cases, hyperkalemia causes weakness, paralysis, and cardiac arrest, and can be fatal.

    Risk Factors for Excess Potassium

    Few individuals meet the recommended intakes for potassium, let alone the levels found in preagricultural diets. In theory, someone could aggravate a sodium deficiency by intentionally eating an extremely low-salt, high-potassium diet. If this occurs it should be seen as a sodium deficiency because it can easily be corrected by salting food to taste.

    Potassium supplements are generally safe for healthy adults. Potassium chloride supplements have caused gastrointestinal distress when provided in a wax matrix or microencapsulated gelatin capsule, but not as a powder mixed with water. Supplemental potassium has been used in amounts as high as 15.6 grams per day in healthy adults without causing any instances of hyperkalemia.

    Dietary potassium may contribute to hyperkalemia in diabetes or insulin resistance, where the insulin response to potassium is inadequate. It may also contribute to hyperkalemia in cases of drugs or medical conditions that impair the excretion of potassium into the urine, which include Addison’s disease, a selective deficiency in adrenal production of aldosterone, and therapy with heparin, ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In these cases, supplemental potassium is more dangerous than food potassium because it raises blood levels of potassium faster. Acidosis, cellular damage, low ATP production from hypothyroidism or diabetes, and digitalis overdose can all shift potassium from the cells into the blood, causing hyperkalemia.

    The FDA limits the content of potassium supplements to less than 100 milligrams per serving to avoid the small risk of hyperkalemia when used by individuals vulnerable to this disorder. However, potassium supplements can be taken in multiple servings, and bulk powders can make it easy to do so. 15 grams per day have been used safely in trials, potassium-rich foods may provide 5 to 15 grams per day, and a healthy adult has the capacity to excrete up to 33 grams of potassium per day. On an empty stomach, high-dose potassium supplements may cause hypoglycemia. Taken with a meal and spread evenly through the day, however, they are safe for healthy individuals. Nevertheless, the conditions that impair potassium excretion are numerous, and some of them -- insulin resistance and NSAID usage -- are common. If you are using potassium supplements that provide more than a gram per day spread evenly across meals, I recommend you consult with your physician to ensure healthy insulin secretion and sensitivity, healthy kidney function, and that you are not taking drugs that contraindicate the use of potassium supplements."
     
  7. OP
    TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Thanks for this!! Very useful text. Salt and sugar, that seems to be the way to go. I will definitely try them out and see if things improve! My god btw, about a year ago I stupidly drank a cup of water with a ton of salt in it, thinking it would help my symptoms of brain injury due to an accident, and ever since my brains felt really weird, shrunken if you may, and now that I have taken this large dose of potassium it seems like things in my brain have reverted to its old state, giving me a huge shift in conscious. It could have to do with the Na/K+ pump in the brain cells. It would explain the firey and tingly sensations I felt in my brain. Or I'm just imagining all of this as it's just hypoglycemia but wow, this sure is a spacey experience lol.

    Wouldn't sugar dissolved in water raise blood sugar too fast?
     
  8. Travis

    Travis Member

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    The thing is though: This could theoretically have more to do with the Cl⁻ ion than with the K⁺ ion. The chloride ion does not appreciably enter the cell because it is negatively charged; even though there may be room for (17·g × ¹⁹⁄₃₆ ≈ 8.97·g) nine grams of potassium in the body, this is not to say that eight grams of chloride would be safe. If I were to take anything to counterbalance potassium, it would sodium bicarbonate. I would avoid salt completely simply out of chloride ion suspicion, and you've just had a month's supply of that in one day.
     
  9. OP
    TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Thanks! But wouldn't the sodium bicarbonate induce alkalinity problems?
     
  10. Koveras

    Koveras Member

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    Good point
     
  11. Travis

    Travis Member

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    Not if you stay under seventeen grams.
     
  12. OP
    TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Aha, thanks my friend! :cool:
     
  13. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Travis, great catch! What is your thought about using salts of organic acids as a preference over salts of strong inorganic acids? I'm referring to supplemental electrolytes calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium.

    You mentioned sodium bicarbonate over sodium chloride. The acid of bicarbonate is carbonic acid, a weak acid. The acid of chloride is hydrochloric acid, a strong acid. If the concern is over excess bicarbonate, the potassium salt of other organic acids can be considered such as potassium citrate etc.

    Anyway, using salts of strong acids could very well introduce an acid load on the blood, and the kidneys and lungs have the added work of having to compensate for it.

    But a daily supplemention of mineral salts of strong acids would be a recurring acid load that leaves less room for CO2 in the blood. The less CO2 in the blood, the more impaired its ability to oxygenate tissues, and the effect would be to lower metabolism.
     
  14. Travis

    Travis Member

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    I think the organic acid chelates would provide negligible amounts. I have not done too many calculations but do know that our liver clears more lactic acid per day than what is normally found in a gallon of yogurt.

    I am fairly certain the amount of citrate, malate, and acetate from routine fruit consumption would greatly overshadow what a person would consume via mineral chelates. I think the organic acid part is safe, and I personally spend more time thinking about the ratios of the minerals themselves.
     
  15. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    In my focus on the kidneys, I forgot about the role of liver. How much does the liver clear when it comes to acids as compared to the kidneys? If the liver is doing most of the work with respect to clearing the acid metabolites in our system, then the kidneys and lungs can have a lighter load. Can the liver be capable of clearing all these acids, and thus leave the kidneys with little to do? What are the acids that the liver can't clear?

    This makes a good case for consuming fruits, not just for fructose, but for minerals. But doesn't fruit only provide plenty of potassium, but isn't rich in calcium and magnesium to substantially cover our needs for them?
     
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