Necessary supplements for a ethical vegan.

Discussion in 'Supplements' started by Franz, Sep 11, 2013.

  1. Franz

    Franz Member

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    Lets say someone is vegan for ethical reasons, eating mostly carby stuff: tropical fruit, sugar, potatoes and rice. Which supplements would he/she be advised to take. I suppose strained vegetable broths can help with nutrient requirements, but still.

    Is this an acceptable protein powder? http://www.growingnaturals.com/products ... iginal.php
     
  2. HDD

    HDD Member

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    The estrogenic properties of legumes were studied when sheep farmers found that their sheep miscarried when they ate clover. (I think it's interesting how this terribly toxic effect has been neglected in recent decades.) All legumes have this property, and all parts of the plant seem to contain some of the active chemicals. In beans, several substances have been found to contribute to the effect. The estrogenic effects of the seed oils and the isoflavones have been studied the most, but the well-known antithyroid actions (again, involving the oils, the isoflavones, and other molecules found in legumes) have an indirect estrogen-promoting action, since hypothyroidism leads to hyperestrogenism. (Estrogens are known to be thyroid suppressors, so the problem tends to be self-accelerating.)
    The various specific actions of the many estrogenic substances in beans and other legumes haven't been throughly studied, but there is evidence that they are also--like estrogen itself--both mutagenic and carcinogenic.

    http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/na ... gens.shtml
     
  3. OP
    Franz

    Franz Member

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  4. HDD

    HDD Member

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    I don't know if a powdered protein supplement is good, but potatoes are.

    Cook them for 40+ minutes and eat with lots of butter/coconut oil and salt.

    You could also juice the potatoes, remove the starch, and cook the liquid. There are some threads discussing this.

    viewtopic.php?f=2&t=428&hilit=RPPS
     
  5. Jenn

    Jenn Member

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    Yeah, basically eat only potatoes with salt and saturated fat of choice. It's boring, but you will get all the nutrients you need.
     
  6. Gabriel

    Gabriel Member

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    As a vegan the most important factor is to ensure adequate protein intake while at the same time minimizing toxin intake. That is the biggest disadvantage to meat eaters and vegetarians, which have a much easier time getting good protein (milk products, gelatin, meat, fish). Unfortunately, as mentioned above, most protein-rich vegetable sources such as soy or legumes also contain significant amount of plant toxins. You may look into proper preparation techniques such as soaking and fermenting to reduce their toxin load while still benefiting from their protein content.

    Another important thing are the fat soluble vitamins. Vitamin D you'll get from the sun or in winter from a supplement (same as normal eaters). Vitamin A you'll have a problem, as you only get beta-carotene, so you have to hope that you are a good beta-carotene to retinol converter (some are not). For optimal beta-carotene conversion you need a good liver function, requiring adequate protein and B12. Vegans are often deficient in B12, so add a good B12 supplement. Vitamin E you should get good amounts from some fruits and vegetables. Vitamin K: You should get plenty of Vitamin K1 from leavy-vegetables but you have to hope for a good gut function that converts enough of it into K2. Otherwise a K2 supplement may be helpful. Kale is a great K1 source (but also contains goitrogens and a lot of beta-carotene).

    Then there is the calcium-phosphours ratio which should be above 1:1. Only good calcium source for you would be leaves, as milk and cheese (best calcium sources) or egg shell calcium (second best) are not an option. So getting a lead-free (see new topic in this forum) and additive-free calcium-carbonate supplement may be a good idea.

    In summary:

    -Ensure adequate protein
    -Avoid/minimize exposure to plant toxins
    -Supplement B12
    -Supplement D in winter
    -Consider supplementing A & K
    -Ensure a good calcium-phosphour ratio
     
  7. OP
    Franz

    Franz Member

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    Thanks Gabriel! Personally I eat animal products, I'm just trying to figure this out because I'm interested :)

    I'm trying to figure out if plant based protein isolates are good options for easy protein (like the potato protein isolate), juicing potatoes doesn't sound that fun.
     
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