Mushroom Protects Against NAFLD, Lowers Liver Weight And Injury Markers

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by raypeatclips, Nov 20, 2016.

  1. raypeatclips

    raypeatclips Member

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    Protective Effects of White Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) against Hepatic Steatosis in Ovariectomized Mice as a Model of Postmenopausal Women

    " In this study, we found that white button mushroom (WBM), Agaricus Bisporus, has protective effects against liver steatosis in ovariectomized (OVX) mice (a model of postmenopausal women). OVX mice were fed a high fat diet supplemented with WBM powder. We found that dietary WBM intake significantly lowered liver weight and hepatic injury markers in OVX mice. Pathological examination of liver tissue showed less fat accumulation in the livers of mice on WBM diet; moreover, these animals had improved glucose clearance ability. "
    "These results suggest that WBM is protective against hepatic steatosis and NAFLD in OVX mice as a model for postmenopausal women."
     
  2. Jon

    Jon Member

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    Donno why no one commented but nice find! This kind of eludes to the mushrooms not having to be cooked for the benefit.
     
  3. Sucrates

    Sucrates Member

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    Raw WBM will contain undesirable amounts if hydrazine or agaratine, which will damage your liver. In cooking it's removed with water, by evaporation. I'm not sure if the freeze drying removes a significant amount. I'd recommend doing some reading before eating raw mushrooms.
     
  4. Jon

    Jon Member

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    Good lookin out!

    Thanks I appreciate the info! I actually just did some research and came to understand why you guys on the forum suggest cooking the crap outta the mushrooms. I'm such a noob at all this stuff still.

    Do you believe the hydrazine can be removed through a thorough sauté ? Or do they have to be boiled?
     
  5. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

    This question is still a bit debated on the forum. Ray says boiling is best. I personally have sautéed in butter on low for 45 min to an hour until all liquid was gone. My internal, (not scientific) compass felt like it was all removed. I pretty much do this every week. Boiling just hasn't appealed to me personally. BUT if you are concerned, that would be the safe route.
     
  6. OP
    raypeatclips

    raypeatclips Member

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  7. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

    Thank you! Results in a nutshell:

    "The cooking time for mushrooms depends on whether they will be consumed as such (usually a short cook- ing time), or whether they are used to give ̄avour to a dish or a sauce (often very long cooking times). In our study, shorter boiling times (5±15 min) reduced the agaritine content of the mushrooms by around 55± 70%, whereas longer boiling times (1±2 h) reduced it with as much as around 90%. Some, but not all, of the agaritine was found in the boiling broth. Since the level of agaritine in the broth was constant with boiling times between 15 min and 2 h, the total de- gradation of agaritine in the system increase with boiling time. Other investigators have made similar

    observations (Liu et al. 1982, Hashida et al. 1990). Fischer et al. (1984), on the other hand, observed no agaritine degradation in cultivated A. bisporus blanched for 5±7 min.

    In Europe, the cultivated mushroom is preferably fried. Depending on the frying procedure (type of fat, frying time and temperature and use of whole or cut mushrooms), the reduction in agaritine content of the fried mushrooms was between 30 and 65% (table 5). Very little agaritine could be recovered from the frying fat. In addition, deep-frying reduced the agar- itine content (by approximately 50%).

    In the USA, on the other hand, the cultivated mush- room is most often consumed as dry-baked at a high temperature (200±225°C, 5±10 min) on pizzas. This type of preparation only reduced the agaritine content of A. bitorquis by around 25%. Gannett and Toth (1991) analysed for agaritine and other phenylhydra- zine derivatives in extracts from fresh or baked A. bisporus (10min at 225°C). In their study, baking reduced the level of agaritine by 27%, 4-(carboxy)- phenylhydrazine by 10% and -N-[®-l-(+)-glutamyl]- 4-carboxyphenylhydrazine by 23% when compared with the unprocessed fresh mushroom. In a parallel experiment, the fresh or baked homogenate of A. bisporus was analysed for the 4-(hydroxymethyl)ben- zenediazonium ion. Baking reduced the content by 41%. These observations have been con®rmed by Toth et al. (1997).

    In addition, microwave processing of the cultivated mushroom resulted in the degradation of agaritine. A heating time of 1 min in the microwave oven resulted in a 65% reduction in the agaritine content of A. bitorquis.

    Taken together, our data and those of other in- vestigators show that the consumer of household- processed cultivated mushroom is also exposed to substantial quantities of agaritine. Clearly, the lowest exposure to agaritine occurs when canned products of the cultivated mushroom (A. bisporus) are consumed (Andersson et al. 1999). Canned A. bisporus usually contains <10% of the agaritine content detectable in fresh mushrooms on the open market (Liu et al. 1982, Stijve et al. 1986, Hajslova et al. 1998, Andersson et al. 1999)."
     
  8. Sucrates

    Sucrates Member

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    I didn't find any better reference than the one above, there is another with less data somewhere though. I boil for 75 mins and then sauté for 5.
     
  9. Jon

    Jon Member

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    @lisaferraro @raypeatclips @Sucrates

    Dizzamn folks...That's a helluvalotta prep for a dang mushroom! They are tasty business though lol. Good lord I must've eaten a near toxic quantity of the volatile compounds! Used to eat em raw in a salad! ☠️☠️

    What if I microwaved them for a minute and then fried the hell out of em in some refined CO? Theoretically a 95% reduction, no?
     
  10. Sucrates

    Sucrates Member

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    I boil them twice a week, they keep well, when I'm frying something I throw a few in. I haven't looked into microwaving them or primarily frying them.
     
  11. Jon

    Jon Member

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    thay sounds like a good way to do it. Guess it's back to the good prep days for me lol after counting macros for years I got lazy and just worried about the numbers at the end of the day, probably why my thyroid hates me now.
     
  12. Frankdee20

    Frankdee20 Member

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    Oh crap, I tend to bake my mushrooms stuffed with goodness for like 10-15. Probably not enough.
     
  13. Frankdee20

    Frankdee20 Member

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    I need a liver transplant now
     
  14. Jon

    Jon Member

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    @lisaferraro @raypeatclips @Sucrates

    I'm thinking maybe the 1 minute microwave time and then frying the crap out of them method might be promising.

    Supposedly a group of Spanish researcher found that microwaving mushrooms resulted in the least amount of beneficial nutrients lost compared to boiling and frying. I couldn't find their actual study, but here's a quote from one of the researchers:

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170519083817.htm
    "When mushrooms were cooked by microwave or grill, the content of polyphenol and antioxidant activity increased significantly, and there are no significant losses in nutritional value of the cooked mushrooms"
     
  15. Sucrates

    Sucrates Member

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    I have the best prices on RPF.
     
  16. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

    This does sound like a good strategy. @Jon the microwaving and then frying up (sautéing) also could work well.
     
  17. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

    :rolling
     
  18. Frankdee20

    Frankdee20 Member

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    Is there a waiting list ?
     
  19. Sucrates

    Sucrates Member

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    Only on weekends.
     
  20. Frankdee20

    Frankdee20 Member

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