Milk Is Good; Growth Hormone Is Bad: But Milk Increases Growth Hormone

Discussion in 'Doubts About Milk' started by sweetly, Oct 11, 2015.

  1. sweetly

    sweetly Member

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    How does that work?
     
  2. halken

    halken Member

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    I love how no one can answer this.
     
  3. jb116

    jb116 Member

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    I questioned this as well referring to Mcdougall out of curiosity but didn't get a response either.
     
  4. XPlus

    XPlus Member

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    Perhaps you'd want to start here http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/gr ... mone.shtml
    That might help with better understanding of GH. Then, come back and read the rest.

    It'd be reluctant to view everything as bad and good.
    It's the long-term net effect of something that's enables us to judge whether we should eat it or do it.
    How'd you feel and look like if you ate something depends on three variables: the ability to process it, the nutritional value and the potential problems it may introduces.
    In the case of milk, these depend largely on the quality of the product.
    Not all milk is created equal.
    Some is grass fed, some is hormone-free, some have less estrogen, some is less allergenic and have more beneficial compounds depending on the feed and how the animal is treated in general.
    Respectable farmers don't milk their cows when pregnant. Thus, there's less estrogen in the product.
    Having said this, Peat usually recommends the best milk available around if tolerated.
    In my experience, if I find myself able to tolerate the milk while I'm travelling - for example - it makes the best option for food around.

    If there'd be any counter arguments, I'd love to see one suggesting a better source of food as an example.
     
  5. dannyroddy

    dannyroddy Guest

    I'm not an expert on IGF-1, and am open to being wrong, but it's produced in the liver, and low thyroid function, estrogen, and malnutrition all appear to decrease its synthesis.

    "Our data demonstrate that long term replacement therapy in children with hypothyroidism is associated with a physiological increase in IGF-1 and IGFBP-3." ► http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10941423

    “...insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels in adults generally fall with age." ► http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7852528

    “Decreased serum if-1 concentrations are well documented in children with kwashiorkor, in malnourished adults, and after long-term fasting in obese male subjects." ► http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10706573

    "Blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, c-peptide, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and IGF-I decreased significantly (P < 0.01-P < 0.001), whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol rose [in women with estrogen replacement therapy] (P < 0.001)." ► http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9024268
     
  6. jb116

    jb116 Member

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    So, in the presence of 'bad stuff', IGF decreases. That is rather perplexing.
    Annnd, glycation decreased with estrogen:?: :?:
    That's a good thing, so what gives there?
     
  7. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    To say that growth hormone is bad is a gross oversimplification. In the same manner as serotonin and estrogen are necessary in physiologically sufficient quantities, the same may be said about growth hormone. Likely, the reason that milk increases GH and IGF-1 is to prompt growth and maturation of young cows.

    I agree with XPlus; it may in fact raise growth hormone, but in the context of a diet there are only a few superior foods with a calcium-phosphorous ratio, fat-soluble vitamins, balance of liver-repleting carbohydrates, fats, and extremely high-quality protein. Additionally, the ability of the body to tolerate metabolic toxins increases as inflammation decreases and youthful cellular respiration increases.

    Basically, the metabolic benefits of milk consumption outweighs the increase in growth hormone. More information is needed, and one would do well to contact Dr. Peat directly about this matter.
     
  8. ThunderSpank

    ThunderSpank Member

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    I asked a while back about this, heres what was said

    Me: "I understand that growth hormone ( IGF-1) is bad but it seems that drinking Milk increases it. Is that something to worry about do you think? Thanks!!!"

    RP: "No"

    :lol: I almost peed when I read that
    I'm not worried if Ray isn't.
     
  9. tara

    tara Member

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    :lol: Be careful what you ask for?
     
  10. halken

    halken Member

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    Why?
     
  11. Westside PUFAs

    Westside PUFAs Member

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    ?
     
  12. ThunderSpank

    ThunderSpank Member

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    Ray does his best to take care of himself, he would never consume something regularly in large quantities that he thought could be hazardous to his health. And I trust him with my life, he's already saved me once :) but if it worries you, don't drink it :2cents
     
  13. dibble

    dibble Member

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    Well that's cleared that up then.
     
  14. gilson dantas

    gilson dantas Member

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    [ moderator edit: threads merged ]

    I adopted cheese and other Peat-friendly foods. And I´m very happy with it.
    About cheese: the argument about its calcium-potassium ratio and the quality and composition of its amino acids to the diet are very convincing to me;
    Only one doubt, if someone can enlighten me:
    what effect the hormone of growth in the milk will have in our health/endocrine system?
     
  15. Mr. God of Cars

    Mr. God of Cars Member

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    About the calcium-potassium ratio, do you mean calcium-phosphorus ratio?
     
  16. Koveras

    Koveras Member

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    What are the concerns specifically?

    Important questions to ask -

    Is the total amount physiologically relevant?

    Is the amount absorbed undenatured/undigested physiologically relevant?

    Taking into account the balance of all positive / negative factors in a food, and the alternative food choices, in the context of the individual - what is the best choice for them?
     
  17. Jenn

    Jenn Member

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    human growth hormone is not the same as cow growth hormone.

    A pregnant cow or person is producing MORE progesterone than at any other time, it's a good thing. ;)
     
  18. gilson dantas

    gilson dantas Member

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    Yes Mr. GOd of Cars; Phosphorus ratio; excuse me;

    Very good Koveras: I liked your method to approach the problem.
    And I ask: what is the total amount of growth hormone in cheese? And then, is that total amount physiologically relevant to our organism? [remembering that the amount is determinant to the calf high growth; is relevant to the calf, I mean]
    Hormones like progesterone usually are absorbed; will or not the cheese growth hormone be absorbed to our blood? I think yes. But I would like to have that answer, in concrete.
    And: of course, cheese - in the broad context of our food reality - is the choice [one of the central choices]; but I think is useful to have idea of the impact of the presence of growth hormone. Those are, I think, specifical questions.
    Perhaps @haidut or @burtlancast or someone may help me to undestand that?
     
  19. lindsay

    lindsay Member

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  20. gilson dantas

    gilson dantas Member

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    Excellent Lindsay; I´m reading the posts [all] and will, overall, study the R Peat´s article; and then I will back with posts;
    thank you,
    Gilson
     
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