Migraine Conundrum

Discussion in 'Symptoms, Causes' started by chispas, Jun 2, 2016.

  1. chispas

    chispas Member

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    My girlfriend has experienced classical migraines since she was six years old. Classical in this context means migraine with aura. I have attempted to help her over the last ten years with the migraines, doing a bit of research here and there. We have tried many different diets and supplements over the years, but a general high-fruit, low-fat, high-dairy, high-protein, zero-grain diet seems to make her feel very good.

    The migraine has remained throughout all the dietary and supplementary changes, although frequency has dropped from as many as seven per year, to three. So we're winning so far.

    Here is the conundrum: one year my girlfriend had no migraines whatsoever. This had never happened before. Because she is so good at keeping records of her routines, dietary and otherwise, we were able to study what had changed over this period. Basically nothing had changed, except for one thing: roasted peanuts.

    My girlfriend started eating lots and lots of roasted peanuts for afternoon tea every day, and we didn't think anything of it. During this one year period without any migraines occurring, she started to have 'migraine vertigo', which is essentially exactly the same as vertigo. Neurologists I have spoken to insist that it is different, but they can't explain what exactly makes it different. I basically do not believe in migraine vertigo as distinct from vertigo.

    Anyway, I noticed that roasted peanuts have a very high ratio of arginine to lysine, and I wondered if maybe lysine was downregulating vasopressin, and thereby preventing the migraine, while arginine was upregulating nitric oxide and causing the vertigo. This is all guesswork on my part, coupled with internet research. Fast forward to one year later, my girlfriend has stopped eating peanuts because of PUFA. The migraines have returned, as well as what seems to be symptoms consistent with high serotonin/prolactin on a daily basis. Strangely, I would not say her current diet contains low amounts of lysine, and yet the lysine that she is consuming as part of her daily nutrition is not having much of a role in minimising serotonin/prolactin or minimising the migraines.

    When I asked two different neurologists to explain the year-long-migraine-free-phenomenon, they each said that 'migraine vertigo makes the migraine go away'. When I protested that this was an insufficient explanation, they each replied, "I actually don't know why". From reading more broadly, this "don't know why" is the official explanation from what I can understand.

    I would really appreciate it if someone could shed some light here. The key question is, what is the relationship between arginine, lysine, and the serotonin neurotransmitter? The current medical misunderstanding of serotonin and nitric oxide both truly disrupt the attempt to interpret research literature correctly, and demonstrably hinder progress to creating an effective treatment.

    There have been a few posts on migraines on this forum, but they are too general. There are different types of migraines, with different symptoms. The limited evidence I've supplied hopefully gives a clue to narrowing down the troubleshooting to a particular relationship of amino acids in the context of preventing classical migraine with aura.

    It's also important to mention that the drug she takes for treating the migraine works on the 1B, 1D and 1F components of the 5-HT receptor, which I understand causes the serotonin receptor to 'release dopamine', but possibly also 'release nitric oxide' when agonised - not antagonised. Haidut quoted Ray Peat in another thread explaining this phenomenon, but I'm not sure how it works. With this medication, the migraine only lasts two-three hours, as opposed to five-seven. Hence, I have given some thought to many serotonin-antagonising substances in helping my girlfriend avoid migraines completely.
     
  2. Sucrates

    Sucrates Member

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    I've had related symptoms, dizzyness (no vertigo) and morning headaches along with tinnitus, read into various diagnoses and treatments. The diagnoses between MAV and meniere's may be arbitrary. There's a serotonin and NO component to all those symptoms and they can be due to excess production of endotoxin or permeability of tissues allowing it through the GI system and other tissues. Endotoxin is used in rodent models of tinnitus, often comes along with vertigo.
    Antivirals; valacyclovir and acyclovir are 85% effective in human studies of meniere's and vestibular neuritis. There are a lot of people getting good results with lauricidin and some other antiviral regimens using lysine and citrus flavonoids, some of which protect from endotoxin. Low dose 1P-LSD or Lauricidin are the only things that have a lasting effect on my headaches without lasting side effects. I think you want to lower NO and attack a potential viral cause, this may lower serotonin. There may be other causes though, like TMJ.

    Dr. Gacek's Newest Study on Antivirals

    http://www.mm3admin.co.za/documents/docmanager/6e64f7e1-715e-4fd6-8315-424683839664/00056616.pdf

    New Study By Prof. Gibson-Relationship between Meniere's Disease and Migraine

    A Supplement Said To Kill Viruses

    More Info On A Supplement Said To Kill Viruses - page 1 - Your Living Room - Meniere's Talk Forums

    http://www.zoominternet.net/~kcshop/JOH.PDF

    http://www.touroinstitute.com/natural bactericidal.pdf

    Viral etiology of Meniere's Disease - Meniere's Disease "Database" - Meniere's Talk Forums
     
  3. OP
    chispas

    chispas Member

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    This is great information, thank you.

    Perhaps the peanut correlation was just me reading into possibilities?

    Currently, my girlfriend is trying B12 supplementation as a preventative. Seems to have some evidence behind it. Will report back.
     
  4. T_Huggy

    T_Huggy New Member

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    In my experience, migraine vertigo is very, very real. In fact, I think it's just migraine without the headache. I get migraines every day, literally. They sometimes include vertigo (30% or so) and sometimes I get just the vertigo without the headache. Often, I'll get the vertigo and the headache comes on later, or vice versa. Often, I'll get motion sickness (e.g. on a turbulent plane ride) and that will trigger migraine with vertigo.

    In my experience, migraine and vertigo are closely tied together - really they're just different parts of the same illness.

    I'll also say that although my migraines happen every day now, many years ago they were highly variable, sometimes coming in clumps, sometimes disappearing for very long periods.

    Your girlfriend's story feels extremely familiar to me. Though I can't prove it, I don't think the peanuts are the key. I think she's just experiencing lots of variability in her migraines, and getting the migraine vertigo, at times, as well.
     
  5. kaybb

    kaybb Member

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    Ok know this is an old post but thought I’d see if you are still here on the forum and have found any help. I have these exact symptoms and very disabled from them. Migraine / vertigo.
     
  6. Robert J

    Robert J New Member

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    Yes and yes. I don't have a good explanation yet, but I've definitely found a preventive that works for me. It probably sounds stupid, but taking Benadryl every day has lowered my migraine frequency from literally every day to a reliable one per week. I had migraines every day for a solid three years. A year and three months ago I started taking Benadryl 4 times per day and within a few days of starting that regime my migraines dropped to 1 per week and have stayed at exactly that level. I'm seeing a new neurologist now, and his guess is that my migraines aren't actually migraines. He's had me do a comprehensive immunological panel, and that has confirmed I have Hashimoto's and that I don't have Lupus and several other autoimmune illnesses. MS has not been ruled out.
    I think there's little harm for other migraine sufferers to try Benadryl for several days. But I can't find any clinical evidence that it is effective for migraine. So probably my neurologist is right and I have some other problem that looks like migraine.
     
  7. kaybb

    kaybb Member

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    Wow!! That is great. Hope you can get even better. I do have Hoshimotos also and take Armour Thyroid. My doctor monitors it with blood tests. The Benadryl is safe enough I could give it a try. It does make me feel depressed/fatigue when I have used it for sleep aid. Do you use caffine or anything else to counter drowsiness?
     
  8. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    Is the milk from commercial sources ?
    I can drink local fresh farm milk without issues but can't touch any store bought one unless it's goat milk, or i get a migraine the next hours.
     
  9. Gone Peating

    Gone Peating Member

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    I would take her to a tmj specialist dentist.

    If she does not have tmj, keep trying anti-serotonin drugs. Has she tried really high dose aspirin, like multiple grams? Combined with high dose caffeine?
     
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