Methylene Blue As A Treatment For Manic Depressive Psychosis

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Mar 28, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    The study was on bipolar disorder psychosis, which is different from the psychosis in conditions like schizophrenia. The psychosis of bipolar disorder is believed to be caused by cortisol, and since methylene blue helped then it suggests methylene blue can lower excessive cortisol. This is not surprising, given the studies I posted on NAD precursors like niacinamide lowering cortisol. The enzyme for deactivating cortisol (11b-HSD2) is an NAD-dependent enzymes and raising NAD levels lowers cortisol plasma levels. Methylene blue oxidizes NADH back to NAD, thus raising NAD levels and the NAD/NADH ratio.
    The doses used in the study were high (100mg orally) but even lower doses may work if taken long enough.

    Methylene blue. A possible treatment for manic depressive psychosis. - PubMed - NCBI

    "...Preliminary experience with methylene blue suggests that this may be therapeutically effective in the manic and depressed phase of manic depressive psychosis and in prophylaxis. This is based on clinical experience and not on controlled trials. In some patients, however, the response was clinically convincing. It is possible that the response was a placebo effect but this seems unlikely since the patients had failed to respond to a variety of drugs in the past. It seems equally unlikely from their history, that the responses were natural remissions of the illness. The subjects of this report were all therapeutically difficult patients because most were suffering from a very chronic disorder and all had failed to respond to conventional therapies despite which 14 out of 22 appeared to respond to methylene blue. It is also possible that methylene blue had a synergistic effect with other drugs, since all patients were receiving other medication. This is only a preliminary report but provides some evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of methylene blue. It is, therefore, essential that controlled trials should now be undertaken before its use becomes more widespread."
     
  2. superhuman

    superhuman Member

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    Cool. Ive taken 1mg MB from time to time but i havent notice or gotten any benefits from it
     
  3. ken

    ken Member

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    When I read about Mb I find that it is considered a derivative of phenothiazine and that was involved in the creation of modern antipychotics. I think this study was very small and pretty uncontrolled. I believe a later study using higher doses was less successful. That being said I find it invigorating. And I some times probably reach 15 mg when I"m not careful.
    P.S I didn't see the 100 mg. I guess I was thinking of another study which was 15 mg. When I went to Pubmed I only saw the abstract. Let's see, that would be five to six ml of kordon blue. No I only do one eyedropper on occasion.
     
  4. Parsifal

    Parsifal Member

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    Do you have a bipolar disorder of psychosis?
     
  5. Dave Clark

    Dave Clark Member

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    If a cortisol saliva test shows that you are low in cortisol, does that mean MB would not be a good thing to use? In fact, would that also mean that niacinamide or nicotinamide riboside, etc. would also not be good to use, regarding low cortisol levels?
     
  6. Antonello

    Antonello Member

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    I'm interested to know this too. Can you please answer @haidut also if low cortisol is accompanied with low blood pressure would methylene blue be a support for people who need increase in blood pressure?
     
  7. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Saliva cortisol is not a reliable measure. Blood test is needed and preferable a test for both AM and PM cortisol in the same day to show if there is a proper diurnal rhythm.
     
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