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"Many people misinterpret the pounding as overstimulation.."

charlie

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http://toopoopedtoparticipate.com/blog/ ... we-speaks/

Dr. John Lowe said:
The only person for whom a small dose of T3 would be harmful would be someone with an extremely fragile heart. Among ambulatory people, this is extremely rare. When a person begins to take an effective dose of T3, his or her previously under-stimulated heart beats more forcibly. The person isn’t used to feeling the vibrations produced by the more forceful projection of blood out of the left large heart chamber (ventricle) against the inner wall of the aorta. Because of this, the person perceives the pounding. Many people misinterpret the pounding as overstimulation of the heart. In fact, it’s just a normal occurrence, as in people who haven’t been hypothyroid. Perception of the pounding is usually enhanced if the person lies on a bed. The bed acts as a sounding board, and this amplifies the perception of pounding and may frighten the person. But if the person understands that the pounding is a harmless phenomenon, he or she will become desensitized to it after a week or two. The pounding from vibrations continue, but the person then isn’t aware of it.
 

jyb

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Re: "Many people misinterpret the pounding as overstimulatio

That's interesting, but even more so the paragraphs on "thyroid hormone resistance" aka "Hypothyroidism Type 2". I never heard RP talk about it, probably because it is rarer. But it is relevant to a few members of this forum incl myself who don't seem to respond that much to thyroid supps: it would be nice to dig more info about it. The author mentions he has that kind of resistance himself.

Start a thread about it?
 

charlie

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Re: "Many people misinterpret the pounding as overstimulatio

Sure jyb feel free to do so. :rockout
 

narouz

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Re: "Many people misinterpret the pounding as overstimulatio

jyb said:
That's interesting, but even more so the paragraphs on "thyroid hormone resistance" aka "Hypothyroidism Type 2". I never heard RP talk about it, probably because it is rarer. But it is relevant to a few members of this forum incl myself who don't seem to respond that much to thyroid supps: it would be nice to dig more info about it. The author mentions he has that kind of resistance himself.

Start a thread about it?

I thought so too, jyb.
I don't know too much about him,
but I run across him every so often because of my interest in/ research on alternative thyroid views.

He's been dead for a few years now.
From what I've gathered, he would seem to be kinduv a rebel sort like Peat,
but I don't think his views, overall, are very Peatian.
I've always stumbled across him when I'm researching the use of T3 only for hypothyroidism.
I'm not clear if he thinks that everyone would be better off on just T3,
or if he thinks there are a group of people for whom such treatment works.

He long treated himself with only T3.
I noted down that his daily dosage was about 150mcg.
This surprised me; sounds like a very high dose,
given that Peat says that we normally manufacture about only 5mcg per hour endogenously(...right?).

I tried taking about that dose (5mcg per hour) of T3 one day
(normally I take about 180mg or a combined T4/T3 supplement)
and my temps and pulses were well down.
So I took about a total of 50mcg T3 that day.
Well...I guess by Lowe's way of looking at things
that dose would be very low.
His daily dose was about 3 times that.
Lowe claimed he had successfully treated himself like that for decades,
and that he had also treated others like that successfully.

Again...just off the top of my head on this Lowe stuff.
 

SheilaHelm1

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Re: "Many people misinterpret the pounding as overstimulatio

Yes Dr. John Lowe died last January, his wife is also a doctor and has had to create a new website, because his website is still in probate with his sisters.. really wish they would hurry up and get it back up online, because it was brilliant.
 

jojo

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Jan 31, 2013
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Re: "Many people misinterpret the pounding as overstimulatio

Hi there,
I have just joined your forum as I 'stumbled' across it after I searched 'heart pounding' on google!
Charlie's thread on heart pounding came up and it was very interesting, thank you!
You all sound very nice and friendly so I though I'd jump on the wagon :mrgreen:
anyway....
I know quite a bit about Dr Lowe and I know people who have been his patients too.
He died last year, 9th of January :( died because of complications after an accident where he suffered a head injury.
Dr Lowe did not believe that everyone should be on t3 only, however he did believe that almost everyone should be on 'T3 containing medication' so much so he stopped using T4 only therapy with his patients as he said the vast majority did a lot better on NDT and/or T3.
He does talk quite a bit about 'thyroid hormone resistance' and 'euthyroid hypometabolism' (I think I fit in the second one)
Dr Lowe believed he had thyroid hormone resistance (where your cells cannot utilise thyroid hormone effectively and as such they need a high dose of floating thyroid hormones in blood in order to 'saturate' the cells) and yes he was on 150mcg daily, the same dose I am on.
As for 'euthyroid hypometabolism' is those people who have normal thyroid chemistry but their metabolism is under-functioning on these normal levels, he describes these people as the ones who normally only do well on high dosages of T3 only (whether thyroid hormone resistance you need a high dose but it can be NDT also, whereas NDT does not work well with euthyroid hypometabolism he says in his book 'the metabolic treatment of fibromyalgia' which I have).

Anyway, thank you for your interesting posts everyone.

narouz said:
I thought so too, jyb.
I don't know too much about him,
but I run across him every so often because of my interest in/ research on alternative thyroid views.

He's been dead for a few years now.
From what I've gathered, he would seem to be kinduv a rebel sort like Peat,
but I don't think his views, overall, are very Peatian.
I've always stumbled across him when I'm researching the use of T3 only for hypothyroidism.
I'm not clear if he thinks that everyone would be better off on just T3,
or if he thinks there are a group of people for whom such treatment works.

He long treated himself with only T3.
I noted down that his daily dosage was about 150mcg.
This surprised me; sounds like a very high dose,
given that Peat says that we normally manufacture about only 5mcg per hour endogenously(...right?).

I tried taking about that dose (5mcg per hour) of T3 one day
(normally I take about 180mg or a combined T4/T3 supplement)
and my temps and pulses were well down.
So I took about a total of 50mcg T3 that day.
Well...I guess by Lowe's way of looking at things
that dose would be very low.
His daily dose was about 3 times that.
Lowe claimed he had successfully treated himself like that for decades,
and that he had also treated others like that successfully.

Again...just off the top of my head on this Lowe stuff.
 

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