• THANKSGIVING SALE: 15% Off @ LifeGivingStore.com & SuchLabs.com Till November 28th With Coupon Code: THANKS2022
    Click Here For Lifegivingstore.com
    Click Here For SuchLabs.com
  • Due to excessive bot signups along with nefarious actors we are limiting forum registration. Keep checking back for the register link to appear. Please do not send emails or have someone post to the forum asking for a signup link. Until the current climate changes we do not see a change of this policy. To join the forum you must have a compelling reason. Letting us know what skills/knowledge you will bring to the community along with the intent of your stay here will help in getting you approved.

Man regrows hair with oral DHT, Anavar

johnwester130

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Aug 6, 2015
Messages
3,563
perindopril- a blood pressure drug -= also lowers aldosterone.

It looks interesting
 

johnwester130

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Aug 6, 2015
Messages
3,563
perindopril may be another drug that stops aldosterone like spironolactone and Eplerenone



 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 25, 2018
Messages
477
Just an off the cuff thought: if DHT causes hair growth, why does creatine, a suppossed DHT promoter, seemingly cause hair loss?
Where is this documented, all I've heard is conjecture : creatine raises DHT --> creatine causes hair loss
 

md_a

Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2015
Messages
428
perindopril- a blood pressure drug -= also lowers aldosterone.

It looks interesting
Impact of atrovastatin and perindopril on the hair cycle in rodent model – risk of drug induced alopecia in patients with heart disease

Perindopril belongs to ACE inhibitors and drug-induced hair loss occurs in 1-5% of treated patients. According to available data, it is observed both in adults and children.

Based on the course of the spontaneous and induced hair cycles the relationship between telogen effluvium and perindopril intake was proven. The hair loss evolved slowly during the experiment. There were only slight differences between tested and control groups during the first spontaneous and induced hair cycles. It was due to premature hair follicle involution not followed by the telogen synchronization. II and III induced and spontaneous hair cycles showed progression of the hair follicle destruction. The premature hair follicle involution was followed by the telogen synchronization and showed toxic effect of the drug responsible for the alopecia. Analysis of the induced and spontaneous hair cycles in time confirmed time related hair follicle destruction, leading to the chronic drug-induced alopecia

ACE inhibitors on zinc levels was also studied (19). During 9 weeks of experiment animals received 2 mg of captopril intraperitoneally. Afterwards zinc levels were determined in indicated tissues. The hair zinc concentration was significantly decreased. It confirmed the role of perindopril in zinc metabolism and in alopecia occurrence. Especially due to fact that, hair loss in rats is related to zinc deficiency (9).

CONCLUSIONS
Perindopril has also toxic effect on the hair follicle and is responsible for drug-induced alopecia. Observed telogen effluvium is chronic and associated with prolonged therapy. In rats clinical outcome is late and involve hair shedding on the lateral body sides.
 

Attachments

  • Impact of atrovastatin and perindopril on the hair cycle.pdf
    209.4 KB · Views: 0

johnwester130

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Aug 6, 2015
Messages
3,563

md_a

Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2015
Messages
428
From what I've read, I think that blocking AT1R could help regenerate hair, and I think that a gel-like valsartan gel, applied topically could have an effect, but I'm just speculating. So, everything that inhibits this AT1 receptor has a total beneficial effect on the body and combined with acetazolamide, for example, I think it is a good solution, and it is worth testing.

……..

The topical application of 1% AT1R inhibition valsartan gel, compared with other tested formulations or placebo, facilitated and significantly accelerated closure time and increased tensile strength in mice, and was validated in the porcine model [35]. The RAS is known to be dysregulated in diabetes, with increased AT1R and decreased AT2R expression in diabetic wound healing, which may play a role in the skin vulnerability associated with diabetes [[36], [37], [38]]. Diabetic patients exposed to ACE inhibitors are more likely to develop foot ulcers than those exposed to ARB, indicating a potential role of AT2R-mediated protection in a diabetic setting [39]. at the same time, topical application of captopril has also already been shown to delay healing of wounds in diabetic mice [35]. Because diabetes could induce the dysfunction of several stem cells including ECSs [[40], [41], [42]], it is intriguing whether AT2R activation in ESCs enhances its function, thereby facilitating healing of diabetic refractory skin wounds.

Critical role of the endogenous renin-angiotensin system in maintaining self-renewal and regeneration potential of epidermal stem cells

…………

We investigated the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) balance in regulating collagen metabolism of diabetic skin. Skin tissues from diabetic model were collected, and the primary cultured fibroblasts were treated with Ang II receptor inhibitors before Ang II treatment. The collagen type I (Coll I) and collagen type III (Coll III) were measured by histochemistry. The expressions of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), MMP-1, TIMP-1 and propeptides of types I and III procollagens in skin tissues and fibroblasts were quantified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Collagen dysfunction was documented by changed collagen I/III ratio in streptozotocin (STZ)-injected mice compared with controls. This was accompanied by increased expression of TGF-β, TIMP-1 and propeptides of types I and III procollagens in diabetic skin tissues. In primary cultured fibroblasts, Ang II prompted collagen synthesis accompanied by increases in the expressions of TGF-β, TIMP-1 and types I and III procollagens, and these increases were inhibited by losartan, an Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker, but not affected by PD123319, an Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist. These findings present evidence that Ang-II-mediated changes in the productions of MMP-1 and TIMP-1 occur via AT1 receptors and a TGF-β-dependent mechanism.

Angiotensin II regulates collagen metabolism through modulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in diabetic skin tissues - PubMed

……….

Results: Our experiments demonstrated the localization of AT1 in the inner root sheath and the inner layers of the outer root sheath. In BCC, positive staining with AT1 was revealed in the tumour cells of basal cell carcinoma with follicular differentiation.



Conclusions: AT1 may have a role in association with follicular keratinization. Studying AT1 distribution may be useful in understanding the pathophysiology of human hair follicles and the hair follicle-associated tumours.

Immunohistochemical study of angiotensin receptors in human anagen hair follicles and basal cell carcinoma - PubMed

………..


Angiotensin II receptor blockade promotes repair of skeletal muscle through down-regulation of aging-promoting C1q expression

Disruption of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor prolonged life span in mice. Since aging-related decline in skeletal muscle function was retarded in Atgr1a−/− mice, we examined the role of AT1 receptor in muscle regeneration after injury. Administration of AT1 receptor blocker irbesartan increased the size of regenerating myofibers, decreased fibrosis and enhanced functional muscle recovery after cryoinjury. We recently reported that complement C1q, secreted by macrophages, activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and promoted aging-related decline in regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle. Notably, irbesartan induced M2 polarization of macrophages, but reduced C1q expression in cryoinjured muscles and in cultured macrophage cells. Irbesartan inhibited up-regulation of Axin2, a downstream gene of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, in cryoinjured muscles. In addition, topical administration of C1q reversed beneficial effects of irbesartan on skeletal muscle regeneration after injury. These results suggest that AT1 receptor blockade improves muscle repair and regeneration through down-regulation of the aging-promoting C1q-Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

Angiotensin II receptor blockade promotes repair of skeletal muscle through down-regulation of aging-promoting C1q expression - Scientific Reports
 

Mossy

Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
1,590
Where is this documented, all I've heard is conjecture : creatine raises DHT --> creatine causes hair loss
I'm not certain where it's documented, though it is quite a wide held experience and discussion that creatine may cause hair loss. My question, like your comment, suggests that creatine may not necessarily be the enemy if DHT is pro-hair.
 
Joined
Apr 25, 2018
Messages
477
I'm not certain where it's documented, though it is quite a wide held experience and discussion that creatine may cause hair loss. My question, like your comment, suggests that creatine may not necessarily be the enemy if DHT is pro-hair.
It's always a question mark and I think hair loss is a pretty complicated subject.

Anecdotally, I've noticed more regrowth while being on TRT and eating like absolute ***t than being off and eating "clean" maybe I can send some photos.

I have yet to see someone complain of hair loss after taking creatine.
 

baccheion

Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2017
Messages
2,100
I'm not certain where it's documented, though it is quite a wide held experience and discussion that creatine may cause hair loss. My question, like your comment, suggests that creatine may not necessarily be the enemy if DHT is pro-hair.
Mainly due to the overmethylation that results. ~50% of methyl groups go toward making creatine. When supplemented, much less are required or more glycine/gelatin or perhaps niacin to clear them out. Glycine is associated with increased balding risk (same as vitamin A, T3, niacin, etc), so it seems to be all loss if unnecessary.
 

Mossy

Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
1,590
...Glycine is associated with increased balding risk (same as vitamin A, T3, niacin, etc), so it seems to be all loss if unnecessary.
Interesting. Because all that you've listed, apart from creatine, has been discussed as being pro-hair within various discussions on this forum. I'm not saying I know otherwise, just relaying what I've read throughout the years on this forum. Health is very complicated, so getting to the truth and establishing true consistencies is near impossible it seems.
 

Mossy

Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
1,590
It's always a question mark and I think hair loss is a pretty complicated subject.

Anecdotally, I've noticed more regrowth while being on TRT and eating like absolute ***t than being off and eating "clean" maybe I can send some photos.

I have yet to see someone complain of hair loss after taking creatine.
Indeed. There is hardly a more pursued health issue than hairloss and yet still no absolutes have been established.

I'd say your experience supports the pro-hair stance of testosterone by many on this forum.

There are several discussions about creatine induced hairloss on this forum. Enough to have had influenced me to consider it as a side effect with creatine. By no means am I sold on it being so, but am cautious. From a very layman's perspective I think the pro-testosterone, pro-DHT perspective had merit: at least when those are in a good balance in the body. But I can't stress enough how much of a scientific-minded person I'm not.
 

GenericName86

Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2018
Messages
323
Mainly due to the overmethylation that results. ~50% of methyl groups go toward making creatine. When supplemented, much less are required or more glycine/gelatin or perhaps niacin to clear them out. Glycine is associated with increased balding risk (same as vitamin A, T3, niacin, etc), so it seems to be all loss if unnecessary.
Glycine can increase balding risk? And T3?
 
Joined
Apr 25, 2018
Messages
477
Indeed. There is hardly a more pursued health issue than hairloss and yet still no absolutes have been established.

I'd say your experience supports the pro-hair stance of testosterone by many on this forum.

There are several discussions about creatine induced hairloss on this forum. Enough to have had influenced me to consider it as a side effect with creatine. By no means am I sold on it being so, but am cautious. From a very layman's perspective I think the pro-testosterone, pro-DHT perspective had merit: at least when those are in a good balance in the body. But I can't stress enough how much of a scientific-minded person I'm not.
I think it’s more testosterone (total) low cortisol and I guess low DHT then anything tbh look at that MPMD guy for example
 

baccheion

Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2017
Messages
2,100
Interesting. Because all that you've listed, apart from creatine, has been discussed as being pro-hair within various discussions on this forum. I'm not saying I know otherwise, just relaying what I've read throughout the years on this forum. Health is very complicated, so getting to the truth and establishing true consistencies is near impossible it seems.
They are. They also all increase PGD2, for example. Heh.
 

golder

Member
Joined
May 10, 2018
Messages
2,340
If anyone knows where to get (specifically) pharma grade oxandrolone could you please let me know. Thank you!
 

Similar threads

Top