• Due to excessive bot signups along with nefarious actors we are limiting forum registration. Keep checking back for the register link to appear. Please do not send emails or have someone post to the forum asking for a signup link. Until the current climate changes we do not see a change of this policy. To join the forum you must have a compelling reason. Letting us know what skills/knowledge you will bring to the community along with the intent of your stay here will help in getting you approved.

Satellite

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2018
Messages
159
Well, magnesium is sedative, especially at higher doses. Nothing unexpected here. Maybe reduce the dose if you do not like the sedation (side)effects.

Ohh ok no no that’s what I wanted it for, but that post made me think on it. Thanks!
 

tygertgr

Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2019
Messages
115
Plain Mg-Cl in water absorbs topically, is dirt cheap, and is not irritating. The trick to get it to absorb is simply to open up the pores with a sauna, hot bath, or exercise, and then smear it evenly over *all* the skin in a light layer.

Romans and Japanese wouldn't have invested present net value billions in building heated mineral water bathhouses if mineral salts didn't come through the skin. 18th century Americans traveled hundreds of miles on foot to bathe in Virginia's hot springs. It's pretty obvious to me that I can *feel*an epsom salt bath working.
 

Amazoniac

Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2014
Messages
8,387
Location
Not Uganda
O

oldfriend

Guest
Have slowed my use of magnoil because no DMSO-free version in sight. What happened?
 

aquaman

Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2013
Messages
1,297
4 drops of Magnoil this evening with a carb-heavy dinner, and 1.5 hours later my blood glucose is 5.2 (or 94), which is very good for me.
 
O

oldfriend

Guest
Some people prefer not to take any. @haidut said there would be a dmso free version by the end of 2018. Was using the dmso version in the interim, but looks the dmso-free version might not be coming?
 

HumanLife

Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Messages
252
Age
25
Just received Magnoil and applied a bit of it on my face. Is the heating effect on my skin normal? This is the only supplement that does it.
 

Satellite

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2018
Messages
159
Just received Magnoil and applied a bit of it on my face. Is the heating effect on my skin normal? This is the only supplement that does it.

Yes, I get that too, but I put it on my forearms. Shortly after I can taste it in my mouth slightly too.
 

agnostic

Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2012
Messages
75
Here's a very interesting new study on the effect of magnesium pidolate on the blood-brain-barrier that I think has not been posted before:

Magnes Res. 2019 Feb 1;32(1):16-24. doi: 10.1684/mrh.2019.0454.
Magnesium and the blood-brain barrier in vitro: effects on permeability and magnesium transport.
Romeo V1, Cazzaniga A1, Maier JAM1.
Author information
1
Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Cliniche L. Sacco, Università di Milano, Via GB Grassi 74, 20157 Milano, Italy.
Abstract
The blood-brain barrier (BBB) tightly regulates the homeostasis of the central nervous system, and its dysfunction has been described in several neurological disorders. Since magnesium exerts a protective effect in the brain, we assessed whether supraphysiological concentrations of different magnesium salts modulate the permeability and magnesium transport in in vitro models of rat and human BBB. Among various formulations tested, magnesium pidolate was the most efficient in reducing the permeability and in enhancing magnesium transport through the barrier. We then compared magnesium pidolate and magnesium sulfate, a widely used salt in experimental models and in clinical practice. Magnesium pidolate performs better than sulfate also in preventing lipopolysaccharide-induced damage to in vitro generated BBB. We conclude that magnesium pidolate emerges as an interesting alternative to sulfate to protect BBB and maintain correct intracerebral concentrations of magnesium.
 

agnostic

Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2012
Messages
75
@Dave Clark

From the introduction of the full-text paper:
The development of in vitro models of BBB has
yielded important insights into our understanding
of the pathophysiology of the BBB. These
models have progressed from simple monocultures
of endothelial cells to more complex
coculture systems in which endothelial cells are
grown on porous cell culture membranes and
cocultured with astrocytes [13].

From the methods section:
Human endothelial cells (HECs) from the
umbilical vein (American Type Culture Collection)
were cultured in M199 containing 10%
dyalised fetal bovine serum (FBS), 1 mmol/L
glutamine, Endothelial Cell Growth Supplement
(ECGS, 150 mg/mL), 1 mmol/L sodium pyruvate,
and heparin (5 units/mL) [15]. Rat Brain
Microvascular Endothelial Cells (RBMEC)
(Innoprot, Derio, Bizkaia, Spain) were cultured
in Endothelial Cell medium (ECM) supplemented
with 5% dyalised FBS and ECGS. Rat
cortical Astrocytes (RCA) (Innoprot, Derio,
Bizkaia, Spain) and Human Astrocytes (HA)
(ScienCell Carlsbad, CA, USA) were cultured in
Astrocyte medium (AM) containing 5% dyalised
FBS and 1% of Astrocyte Growth Supplement.
Different cocultures were developed i) RBMEC/
RCA and ii) HECs/HA [13] and defined rat BBB
and human BBB, respectively. The BBB in vitro
models were established using the Transwell
system (Corning, Corning NY, USA) with a
0.4 mm pore size. RCAs or HA (35,000/cm2) were
seeded on the underside of the insert precoated
with Poly-L-lysine (100 mg/mL). Once they
reached confluence, HECs or RBMECs were
seeded on the upper side of the membranes
(60,000/cm2) precoated with fibronectin (50 mg/
mL). BBB was validated by measuring the
transmonolayer electrical resistance (TEER) of
the endothelial monolayer at various time points
using an EndOhm (World Precision Instruments,
Friedberg, Germany). The experiments
were repeated 3 times, each sample being
replicated 3 times. Results were expressed in
Wxcm2 [16] and are presented as the mean S.
E.M. values.
 

HumanLife

Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Messages
252
Age
25
Yes, I get that too, but I put it on my forearms. Shortly after I can taste it in my mouth slightly too.

I went to a pharmacy today to buy coconut oil and I saw they were selling magnesium oil. I was curious about it so I decided to check out its content, and it claimed that tingling can occur when the body successfully absorbing the magnesium if the body was deficient.
 

Nemo

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2019
Messages
2,163
I've been taking Magnoil for a little over a week now; a full dose divided between early a.m. and early evening and have experienced the following effects:
- improved glucose control. It has eliminated the reactive hypoglycemia I almost always experience after lunch and dinner.
- no more stiff legs. Over the past 10 months or so I've had constant really stiff legs, mostly around the hamstring area and sometimes my thighs too. I've tried Mag chloride spray, which helped some near the surface but not deep into the legs, and Magnoil has completely eliminated all stiffness. I can do leg stretches much more easily now.
- less thirst. Sometimes my thirst is insatiable, but since starting Magnoil I don't feel the need to drink nearly as much water.

Hmmm, no more stiff legs. Magic words for me.
 

Dave Clark

Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
1,437
Wondering if alcohol could be used rather than DMSO, since some people make Mag-a-Hol instead of using magnesium oil, claiming it absorbs better than just having the Mg chloride in a water base?
 

Soren

Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2016
Messages
1,392
Are there any studies showing magnesium's benefit with regards to drug addiction?
 

Rhys

New Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2019
Messages
2
I tried this on my forearms and immediately got a burning itchy sensation that lasted for 10 minutes until I washed it off, also red bumps on my skin, my guess is im allergic to DMSO. Any similar responses?
 

Similar threads

Top