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LSD-derivatives Like Bromocriptine Can Fully Cure Breast Cancer

jyb

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Dopamine is one of those hormones that varies pretty strictly with one's circadian rhythms. Again, anything that modifies dopamine homeostasis (and that includes "indirect compounds" like the cannabinoids and nicotine), should respect this circadian pattern.
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I think it's great to pay attention to this when supplementing in general. However in this case, I can think of counter-examples where a supplement is said to help induce sleep by relaxation despite (or possibly as a result of) increased dopamine activity.
 

tyw

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I think it's great to pay attention to this when supplementing in general. However in this case, I can think of counter-examples where a supplement is said to help induce sleep by relaxation despite (or possibly as a result of) increased dopamine activity.

"Dopamine Activity" needs to be defined very specifically, because each of the Dopamine Receptors 1 to 5 may respond differently to a particular drug. (Though it's mostly a case of D1-family vs D2-family).

Bromocriptine will act on DRD2 and DRD3 most strongly (though it does have an agonist effect on all Dopamine receptors at high doses). Therefore, the commentary on this particular drug should focus on the activity of these 2 particular receptors.

So for example, we know that Modafinil promotes wakefulness, and that it acts specifically by allowing more dopamine activity at DRD2 -- Effects of Modafinil on Dopamine and Dopamine Transporters in the Male Human Brain

Nora Volkow et. al. have produce a bunch of studies showing that Sleep deprivation down-regulates DRD2 and DRD3. We speculate that this is a compensatory effect -- the body reduces the activity "wakeful promoting receptors" in order for faster onset of sleep.

Examples (search "nora volkow dopamine" for more studies):

- Evidence That Sleep Deprivation Downregulates Dopamine D2R in Ventral Striatum in the Human Brain
- http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053811909000159

All the Dopamine Receptors are G-coupled protein receptors which affect circadian rhythmicity, and their stimulation can and will affect circadian rhythms with or without light stimulation (there are many other non-light-dependent G-coupled protein receptors) -- Circadian rhythmicity in dopamine content of mammalian retina: role of the photoreceptors. - PubMed - NCBI

This commentary does not invalidate the effectiveness of sleep-promoting drugs that happen to promote dopamine activity. The only point that I want to make is that analysis of a drug must be as specific to that particular drug as possible (Bromocriptine in this case), and should try to involve base mechanisms of that drug as far as possible ;)

.....
 

conhnore

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When a plausible mechanism is available, we must not forget to mention that mechanism ;)
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Therefore, when we talk about a person has "good leptin sensitivity", "good insulin sensitivity", "being well fed", etc .... we are actually talking about upstream effects which may or may not affect what the hypothalamus thinks is a "safe state for further metabolism". What we are really concerned about is robust signalling at this hypothalamic site.

thx for your post
 

jyb

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Bromocriptine will act on DRD2 and DRD3 most strongly (though it does have an agonist effect on all Dopamine receptors at high doses). Therefore, the commentary on this particular drug should focus on the activity of these 2 particular receptors..

Cyproheptadine and kavalactones will act on DRD2 and yet I think many will agree they can put you to sleep quickly.

All the Dopamine Receptors are G-coupled protein receptors which affect circadian rhythmicity, and their stimulation can and will affect circadian rhythms with or without light stimulation (there are many other non-light-dependent G-coupled protein receptors) -- Circadian rhythmicity in dopamine content of mammalian retina: role of the photoreceptors. - PubMed - NCBI

That's very interesting.
 
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c093

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Hey @Blossom and @thebigpeatowski!

Thank you both for your responses!! She did try topical progesterone but it appeared to make it worse. Not sure why though. I will let her know about taking it orally but I think she might be hesitant based on her previous experience.

Will definitely look into the preg to suggest for her! And I will pass on that article re: plucking and the bromocriptine link! Thanks @Blossom!

This definitely seems to be a tricky lingering issue and my previous correspondence with Ray he recommended all of the usual heavy hitters (progest-e, thyroid, calcium, protein, and so on) to oppose androgen, lower adrenaline, and prolactin and raise progesterone, so I was trying to understand if anything else out there that helps these issues would help her hirsutism.

Will keep any eye out for Haidut's lisuride and
I will also suggest the light thingy for her more stubborn trouble spots. Thanks @thebigpeatowski !!!

Will keep you both informed if she finds anything that works!
 

tyw

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Cyproheptadine and kavalactones will act on DRD2 and yet I think many will agree they can put you to sleep quickly

"Acting on" a receptor is not specific and useful statement.

Cyproheptadine is a DRD2 antagonist, while Bromocriptine is a full DRD2 agonist -- Cyproheptadine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . I would speculate cryptoheptadine works through the high affinity for inhibiting both serotonin transport (SERT) and many of the 5-HT receptors.

Drowsiness / sleep onset from this drug is usually a side effect, and not the primary purpose of the drug in most cases.

A kavalactone like Kavain is a calcium channel regulator (usually inhibitory), which is seen as a anti-convulsent, and may help with sleep via this mechanism -- Kavain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

And that is just one of the many kavalactone, and each has many independent and significant effects (like cannabinoid receptor Agonism). None are "full Dopamine agonists" like a drug such as bromocriptine.

Again. We must be specific about specific compounds ;)

....
 

Lightbringer

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So for example, we know that Modafinil promotes wakefulness, and that it acts specifically by allowing more dopamine activity at DRD2 -- Effects of Modafinil on Dopamine and Dopamine Transporters in the Male Human Brain
Do you think Modafinil is a safe substance to use for intermittent use (interviews etc) ? It seems to increase histamine:
Involvement of central histaminergic systems in modafinil-induced but not methylphenidate-induced increases in locomotor activity in rats
 

tyw

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Do you think Modafinil is a safe substance to use for intermittent use (interviews etc) ? It seems to increase histamine:
Involvement of central histaminergic systems in modafinil-induced but not methylphenidate-induced increases in locomotor activity in rats

I'll be the first to tell you that risks are always high with such drugs ;)

Modafinil's effects are still not fully understood. It seems to affect dopamine levels, and seems to interact through DRD2 ..... is it a sole stimulus to the dopamine receptor? Does it affect re-uptake? What are the effects on homeostasis? .... No clue on all counts.


Of course, I think you've heard the stories of people crashing massively after large doses of Modafinil. I do not know anything about low dose Modafinil, nor anything to do with the micro-dosing culture (wrt any drug).

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Also, since histamines were brought up, I think it's still important to note that endogenous Histamine release is still going to be mediated by immune cells (basophils and mast cells).

"Histamine-releasing" really refers to a stimulus that your immune system has decided to release Histamine as a signalling molecule.

Exogeneous histamine that is absorbed will of course directly play a role in raising serum levels of histamine, but even then, that Histamine has to be interpreted by the various Histamine receptors on various tissues. At the end of the day, Histamine is just another signalling molecule, and one with many important roles.

That also means that there is no way to say how one person will respond to a particular amount of histamine.

....
 

tomisonbottom

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"Acting on" a receptor is not specific and useful statement.

Cyproheptadine is a DRD2 antagonist, while Bromocriptine is a full DRD2 agonist -- Cyproheptadine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . I would speculate cryptoheptadine works through the high affinity for inhibiting both serotonin transport (SERT) and many of the 5-HT receptors.

Do you think this means cypro and bromo can't/shouldn't be taken in the same day?
 

NewACC

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@haidut Does this mean that bromocriptine will be 6 times more efficient in sublingual reception?
My hats off to all of you guys/girls! Aside from the support I get on the forum, spreading the word on these "alternative" treatments by people visiting the forum is invaluable. A friend of mine works for a Big 5 pharma company and told me last week that trials are under way with anti-prolactin drugs for IBS-C. Apparently Big Pharma saw increased "buzz" online (they monitor forums like this one believe it or not) about the apparent connection between hyperprolactinemia and IBS-C and decided to try it in one of their clinical sites. I don't know if they saw the "buzz" on this forum but a quick search shows that this is pretty much the only place with a study describing the connection between prolactin and IBS-C.
So, I'd like to believe that the discussions here are affecting the direction of pharma activity in some way even though it will likely result in some old, safe, and effective drug being re-approved for a new condition and its price increasing 1,000 fold overnight. Already happened to lisuride, probably due to the terguride trials. Try and find lisuride for sale online. Most places are sold out and the ones that have it have increased the price 3-5 times.
Anyways, thanks for the continued support and encouragement!
 
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