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Low Vitamin D Levels In Patients With ADHD

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Mar 5, 2018.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    The study is not interventional, so too early to say if vitamin D supplementation will help ADHD. However, the link seems promising given the role of vitamin D in dopamine synthesis, which is though to be low in ADHD.

    [Full text] Vitamin D and vitamin D receptor levels in children with attention-def | NDT

    "...Objective: In this study, we aimed to evaluate vitamin D and vitamin D receptor levels in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
    Patients and methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 80 children including 40 ADHD patients (aged 6–12 years; 28 males and 12 females) and 40 age-, sex-, and season of blood collection-matched controls (aged 6–12 years; 25 males and 15 females) were enrolled. Serum vitamin D and vitamin D receptor levels and calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase were measured. The vitamin D receptor levels in the serum were measured using the quantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassay technique.
    Results: Serum vitamin D and vitamin D receptor levels were found to be significantly lower in children with ADHD compared to healthy controls. No significant differences were found in serum calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase levels. No significant differences were found among the ADHD subtypes in terms of serum vitamin D, vitamin D receptor, calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase levels.
    Conclusion: This study suggests that children with ADHD have lower levels of vitamin D and vitamin D receptor. According to the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to describe vitamin D receptor levels in ADHD."
     
  2. Murtaza

    Murtaza Member

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    I can second this. I tested chronically low vit D at 19ng/mL. Ive had a problem with concentration throughout my school. Never got diagnosed but maybe thats because my parents never noticed it, but i know ive had this problem for a long time.
     
  3. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

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    The Sahin study has useful findings and nice references. There is a cluster of recent reports also supporting vitamin D’s role in these difficulties.

    The Impact of Vitamin D Supplementation on Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children. - PubMed - NCBI
    “The diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency was significantly greater in children with ADHD compared with the control group ( P < 0.05). Children with ADHD had significantly…lower values of serum vitamin D (17.23 ± 8.98) than the control group(31.47 ± 14.42). The group receiving vitamin D supplementation demonstrated improvement in cognitive function in the conceptual level, inattention, opposition, hyperactivity, and impulsivity domains.”

    Vitamin D Deficiency and a Blunted Parathyroid Hormone Response in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. - PubMed - NCBI
    “The mean serum 25(OH)D, Ca, and P levels of the children with ADHD were significantly lower than those of the healthy controls….Serum PTH levels were found to be normal, but vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, and hypophosphatemia were observed in children with ADHD.”

    Association of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorders with Mean Platelet Volume and Vitamin D
    “…there were significant differences in terms of vitamin D and vitamin B12. The patient groups showed lower levels of vitamin B12 and vitamin D. In the ADHD group, there was a negative correlation between both vitamins and MPV (p<0.05). Partial correlation analysis of the ADHD group showed that MPV [mean platelet volume] in particular was negatively correlated to vitamin D, and not to vitamin B12

    [Correlation between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and core symptoms of autism spectrum disorder in children]. - PubMed - NCBI
    “Serum vitamin D level in ASD children was significantly lower than that of the control group ( (0.021±0.008) vs. (0.036±0.016) ng/L, t=-8.17, P<0.01), and the between-group percentage difference of normal, insufficient and deficient levels of vitamin D was statistically significant….”
    “There were negative correlations between serum vitamin D level in ASD children and total ABC score or ABC subscale scores (body behavior, self-care, language and social interaction)”
    “There were negative correlations between serum vitamin D level in ASD children and SRS behavior subscale or ATEC social interaction subscale….”

    Vitamin D Status and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. - PubMed - NCBI
    “…the meta-analysis of their data revealed that lower vitamin D status is significantly associated with the likelihood of ADHD (OR: 2.57; 95% CI: 1.09...). Furthermore, the meta-analysis of prospective studies conducted in 4137 participants indicated that perinatal suboptimal vitamin D concentrations are significantly associated with a higher risk of ADHD in later life (RR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.09...).”

    Effect of vitamin D supplementation as adjunctive therapy to methylphenidate on ADHD symptoms: A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. - PubMed - NCBI
    “Vitamin D supplementation as adjunctive therapy to methylphenidate improved ADHD evening symptoms. Future research is needed to clarify vitamin D effects as monotherapy in ADHD and its mechanism.”
     
  4. Tarmander

    Tarmander Member

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    Probably helping calcium problems. Calcium can be quite stimulating in a unfocused kind of way.
     
  5. Vinero

    Vinero Member

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    They are still treating ADHD with amphetamines instead of Vitamin D.
    Amphetamines temporarily increase dopamine, but it also increases adrenaline and consequently free fatty acids a lot, and is generally anti-thyroid.
     
  6. lampofred

    lampofred Member

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    Do you know anything more about this and how to fix it? Stimulated in an unfocused way is exactly how I feel. And magnesium (orange juice), nicotine, progesterone, glycine, Vit D, thyroid, bag-breathing, etc. (yeah, I've tried a crap load of things lol...) which are all anti-calcium are the only things that help but only very temporarily and do not last long enough for me to get any work done. People are very surprised when I tell them stimulants don't work for my "ADHD" at all but sedatives work wonders.
     
  7. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    The amphetamines also have notorious effect on tolerance, so higher and higher doses are needed to get the same effects. If the person stops them they become basically zombies due to the drop in dopamine and it drives some people to commit suicide.
     
  8. Vinero

    Vinero Member

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    The amphetamines will greatly increase adrenaline and cortisol, which gives a burst of energy to people who use it. At the same time it supresses their thyroid.
    When the drug is out of their system, adrenaline and cortisol come back down to normal. The thyroid is still supressed.
    In this situation there is nothing to produce energy from: the thyroid-driven metabolism has been damaged, and the cortisol-adrenaline system is back to normal.
    This explains the zombie-like state, I think.
     
  9. Tarmander

    Tarmander Member

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    Just a bit. Taking higher doses of vitamin k and vitamin d seem to help a little.

    Also, you really have to avoid hydrolyzed proteins and anything with free glutamate. About 9 months ago I decided to go a week on no free glutamate. There are actually a lot of good things on that list like chicken broth and gelatin. But I cut it all out.

    It is hard to describe but it was like I could finally focus. I was not obsessively trying to multitask and do things that boost dopamine. ADHD is so tough because it could also be described as an addiction to dopamine stimulation...but there is tolerance developed there so you never really dig into anything before moving on to the next interesting thing.

    I would try the no glutamate challenge, I think it might really make a difference. The calcium angle is tougher to hit, but 10-15mg of vitamin k mk4 per day I have found very relaxing. Have you tried that?

    Lastly a couple carrots and some charcoal a day really boost my dopamine.
     
  10. Koveras

    Koveras Member

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    Given your post on the role of hormones on vitamin D levels -

    That brings up some questions like -

    How are hormone levels in ADHD?

    Is PCOS associated with ADHD?


    How about the role of estrogenic chemicals like BPA on ADHD?


    The effect of BPA on hormone levels?


    The effect of BPA on vitamin D levels?
     
  11. Andman

    Andman Member

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    sounds like me, esp in winter! Any big glutamate things worth mentioning except gelatine/broth? Most lists found online are a bit inconsistent
     
  12. Tarmander

    Tarmander Member

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    The lists are good enough. Avoid packaged stuff and then there are a few veggies that are high in glutamates if I remember right. Also avoid overcooking protein or boiling it for long periods of time. No crock pot. For the week challenge I think it best to find a few foods that you know are low glutamate and eat those. It might suck a bit as glutamate gives things flavor.
     
  13. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Thanks, and I will also add the studies [1, 12, 13] that I posted in the Calcirol thread showing vitamin D is capable of binding and interacting with all steroid receptors including thyroid.
    Given that BPA is known to be an estrogen receptor (ERa) agonist and thyroid receptor antagonist, I wonder if BPA and other similar endocrine disruptors are VDR antagonists as well. The studies you posted show that those endocrine disruptors inhibit vitamin D synthesis, but I suspect they also block it at the receptor.
     
  14. lampofred

    lampofred Member

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    I tried 2 tbsp butter mixed with 15 mg of Thorne mk4 and 6000 iu Carlson's Vit D and it worked for like 15 min. Gelatin actually helps me noticeably, so I'm not sure if the issue is solely glutamate-related but I'll give it a try.
     
  15. GAF

    GAF Member

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    Vit D deficiency seems to be a difficult problem to solve.

    It shouldn't be.

    What are we missing?
     
  16. Tarmander

    Tarmander Member

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    I find topical on D and K much better then oral. SomeThing about fat soluble irritates my guts.
     
  17. Cydanic

    Cydanic Member

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    I was on adderall/ritalin from ages 7-22, and am definitely dealing with the drop in dopamine now having quit. Any advice to help mitigate this would be appreciated! I do worry about serious receptor down regulation from a developing brain being bombarded with amphetamines lol
     
  18. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Have you tried upping your protein intake, the BCAA/tyrosine combo discussed on the forum, or one of the adamantane derivatives?
     
  19. Cydanic

    Cydanic Member

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    I have dabbled with all of those and they do seem to help...Especially your diamant, and lisuride.

    My understanding of dopamine is cursory at best, so it puzzles me how some things increase synthesis (sunlight, high status, being in nature) without negatively impacting receptors, while other things like amphetamines, sugar, chocolate, ect raise it in a way that down regulate receptors long term.

    Care to shed some light?
     
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