Low-fat, High-carb, Ad-libitum Diet Leads To Fat/weight Loss In Women

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Feb 21, 2018.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    About 2 years ago, I posted a controversial rat study which showed that the addition of large amounts of sucrose to the diet of rats did not lead to any weigh gain.
    Drinking Coke Freely Quadruples Calorie Intake WITHOUT Weight Gain

    The diet in the rat study above can be considered a high-carb, low fat diet as a result of those extra calories from sucrose. This human study below corroborates the findings of the above study. It found that a high-carb, low-fat but ad-libitum diet over an 8-month period not only did not lead to weight gain but instead led to significant weight (and more specifically fat) loss in post-menopausal women. The study calls this a very-low-fat diet, bu considering that fat was 11%+ of calories I don't think this a warranted label. Very-low-fat diets are ones that drop fat intake to 5% or below of daily calories.


    An ad libitum, very low-fat diet results in weight loss and changes in nutrient intakes in postmenopausal women. - PubMed - NCBI
    "...RESULTS: Fat intake decreased from 33.2+/-7.5% to 11+/-4% over the 8-month intervention period (P<.00001). Weight loss was 6.0 kg+/- 4.2 kg (P<.000038), an 8% weight change, and decrease in percent body fat of 2.7%+/-0.2% (P< or =.000046). Weight correlated better with the self-reported fat intake (r=0.321, P<.01) than the energy intake (r=0.263, P<.05) at baseline. Fiber intake increased from 16 g+/-0.6 g to 23 g+/-0.2 g (P<.0005). All micronutrient intakes remained at or above preintervention ranges, except for a decrease in vitamin E intake from 8.1 mg+/-4.0 mg to 3.7 mg+/-1.1 mg (P<.0005) on the very low-fat diet and linoleic acid from 6.3%+/-1.5% to 2.5%+/-0.7% (P<.000001) with no significant reduction in linolenic acid. Hormone replacement was not associated with the amount of weight loss."

    "...APPLICATIONS: This study demonstrates that adherence to a very low-fat diet consumed ad libitum causes weight loss in the 5% to 10% range and a reduction of body fat. These reductions, along with the observed decreases in fat intake, are associated with improved health outcomes. Because of the decreased vitamin E and n-3 fatty acid intake, emphasis on foods high in these nutrients may need to be encouraged for those consuming a very low-fat diet."

    "...The present study supports other research that ad libitum, low-fat diets, even without energy or portion restriction, lead to decreased energy intake and weight loss. The lower energy intake, which naturally occurs, plays a significant role in the amount of weight loss. Our study demonstrated that a greater reduction in dietary fat led to a greater amount of weight loss. Low-fat intake resulted in weight loss without food deprivation and significantly reduced dietary cholesterol and saturated fat intake, which can lower risk factors for coronary artery disease. Therefore, it seems prudent to suggest restriction of dietary fat, especially in the obese population. ■ An ad libitum, low-fat intake can be achieved without sacrificing the micronutrient content of the diet, except for vitamin E and essential fatty acid intakes. Therefore, specific instructions on increasing the intake of vitamin E- and n-3 fatty acid– rich foods, such as dark-green leafy vegetables, fish, whole grains, flax seeds, and small amounts of certain nuts, while reducing dietary fat intake should be provided. ■ Reduction in body weight via dietary fat restriction alone results in slightly greater loss of fat vs lean tissue. However, the addition of exercise and activity to dietary intervention would likely result in greater improvements in body composition, maintenance of fat-free mass and lead to greater weight loss success and maintenance."
     
  2. cyclops

    cyclops Member

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    Dis iz what I'm talking bout...Low-fat for the win!
     
  3. Fractality

    Fractality Member

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    Yes, and I think if the 10-15% of fat calories are saturated, fat loss could be enhanced. Personal experimentation is required.
     
  4. encerent

    encerent Member

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    I was very lean when I was eating very little fat. Lately I've been eating a bit more coconut oil and chocolate and have noticeably gotten fatter.
     
  5. grenade

    grenade Member

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    My n=1 is that when my calories from fat averaged 5% or less of my total calories, I lost weight at a slow but steady pace, while still eating a total caloric amount that surpassed what was normally my “maintenance calories.”

    I was able to push it further by performing activity that was low enough in intensity that the stress hormones never rose and the muscles still used fat for fuel, e.g. walking.

    I’m doing it again as we speak, because eating a mixed macronutrient diet ad libitum made me gain weight rapidly, despite the improvements I saw in stress and my metabolism.
     
  6. grenade

    grenade Member

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  7. Vinero

    Vinero Member

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    Where does the bulk of your calories come from? Do you eat mostly sugar or include starches as well?
    I wouldn't eat a 5% fat diet long-term, that seems dangerously low.
     
  8. grenade

    grenade Member

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    80% carbohydrate. Mostly sugar coming from fruit, milk, and white sugar. Occasionally I’ll have boiled potatoes when I do have some sort of meat/fish/offal.

    My dinner tonight, for example, was half a pound of boiled potatoes, 4 oz of boiled oysters, washed down by a pint of skim milk fortified with a quarter cup of sugar, 2 tablespoons of gelatin, and half a teaspoon of salt.
     
  9. Vinero

    Vinero Member

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    Those foods are very safe (low iron and PUFA), and also give you most essential nutrients.
    I wonder if the lack of dietary fat will compromise your health somehow in the long run.
    The lack of fat-solubles vitamins come to mind.
     
  10. Ulysses

    Ulysses Member

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    A fairly easy possible solution: just drink 1% milk and cut out all other fat. Even on 12 cups of milk a day your total fat intake is 30 grams, which is less than 10% TDEE assuming 3,000 cal/day. Fat-soluble vitamins are why I’d rather get fat from eggs/milk than coconut oil, if I’m eating low fat. When I eat this way, I'm able to hit all my fat-soluble vitamin targets, according to Cronometer.

    OTOH, if enough of those carbs are boiled starch, then maybe it's better to drink skim milk and cook with butter, so that you can more efficiently pair the saturated fat with with the starch. Just have to measure carefully.
     
  11. Vinero

    Vinero Member

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    That would probably work, although I would take it easy on the eggs. Eggs contain a lot of linoleic acid. Ray said to limit eggs to 2 a day max.
     
  12. Ulysses

    Ulysses Member

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    That's what I've been doing. I've been wondering for a while, will two egg yolks a day provide me with enough choline to protect the liver, or should I be trying to get more than that?
     
  13. Vinero

    Vinero Member

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    Choline is excitotoxic I thought? I count on caffeine, saturated fat, and vitamin K2 to protect my liver.
     
  14. grenade

    grenade Member

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    Topical supplementation should take care of vitamins ADEK.

    As for long term health, I’ll let other people argue for or against it. I’m not that knowledgable.
     
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