Low-dose Aspirin Reduces Miscarriage Risk In Women With High Inflammation

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    I posted recently about niacinamide being a potential treatment of pre- and -eclampsia. This new study adds aspirin to the list of substances that can help a mother with compromised health carry a baby to term. The benefit seems to be particularly relevant for women with PCOS and diabetes. The mechanism of action of aspirin seems to be lowering of systemic inflammation, which was measured through CRP.

    Daily Low-Dose Aspirin May Boost Chances of Successful Pregnancy

    "...Then, the researchers divided the women into three groups: those with low, medium and high CRP levels. Overall, 55 percent of the women in the study became pregnant and gave birth. Among the women with high CRP levels, those who took a daily aspirin had a birth rate of 59 percent, compared with just 44 percent among those who took the placebo. Taking daily aspirin also lowered CRP levels in the women with the highest CRP levels. Women with low or medium CRP levels had about the same birth rate, regardless of whether they took aspirin or a placebo, the researchers found."
     
  2. raysputin

    raysputin Member

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    Aren't women usually told to take progesterone after miscarriage to help with implantation? In this case, would progesterone act in an anti-inflammatory manner, balancing out the ratio between itself and estrogen? What is the relationship between progesterone and CRP?

    C-reactive protein across the menstrual cycle. - PubMed - NCBI

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a widely used, sensitive biomarker of inflammation. Studies conducted among users of exogenous hormones suggest that estrogen increases CRP, whereas progesterone decreases CRP. Examinations of CRP in normally cycling women suggest the opposite: CRP is negatively associated with endogenous estrogen and positively associated with endogenous progesterone. This work evaluates the association between menstrual cycle-related hormone changes and events (menstruation and ovulation) and CRP.
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Yes, progesterone has anti-inflammatory effects and can also lower CRP. Peat even said in one of his interviews something along the lines of "aspirin is a simpler molecule than progesterone but has remarkable overlaps in effects with it". Anything that opposed PUFA or lowers lipolysis will lower inflammation as well. Thus, niacinamide, vitamin E, aspirin, magnesium, taurine, etc all have anti-inflammatory effects and they all have been shown to lower CRP.
     
  4. Progesterone

    Progesterone Member

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    Great info. Thank you haidut.
     
  5. Dan Wich

    Dan Wich Member

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    For people's reference, here is the study. The group that benefited was classified as high at CRP ≥1.95 mg/L, so it may have included women thought of as "average" by common bloodwork reference ranges.
     
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