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Low-dose Aspirin Blocks Multiple Sclerosis (MS) And Reverses Its Damage

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Nov 28, 2018.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    A few years ago I posted a study showing that 1.2g aspirin daily greatly ameliorated fatigue in MS patients and was considered safe enough even at that high dose to be recommended for daily use.
    Sunlight And Aspirin Can Treat Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

    However, those studies did not look at whether aspirin actually affected the clinical course of the disease, even though the reduction of fatigue strongly suggested that it did. This new study below shows that aspirin not only blocks the relapses of MS but halts the progression of the disease and completely restores the lost myelin in the nerves, after only 8 days of treatment. These dramatic results were seen in doses even below a "baby aspirin" (81 mg) daily. The HED of aspirin doses used in the study were 0.07 mg/kg and 0.15 mg/kg. The proposed mechanism of action for aspirin was the reduction of inflammatory burden, including nitric oxide (NO). So much for the "benefits" of NO. I am beginning to wonder if the recent spike in MS diagnoses in men is not at least partially due to the boom in sales of Viagra-type drugs.
    In light of the shockingly successful trial with high-dose biotin, I am afraid it won't be long before both biotin and aspirin get labelled as prescription drugs only. Unlike pregnenolone and DHEA, I don't think there is a law protecting these chemicals from encroachment by the FDA and Big Pharma. So, as was shown in the case of pyridoxamine, if a company performs a clinical trials with aspirin for MS and shows it is effective then that company can petition the FDA to withdraw aspirin from the market. The company running the trials with biotin already petitioned FDA to ban all OTC products that contain more than 1mg biotin per pill/dose. No decision on that yet, but the process has already been put in motion and aspirin could be next.

    Aspirin ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through interleukin-11–mediated protection of regulatory T cells
    "...We observed marked expression of proinflammatory molecules like iNOS and IL-1 in spinal cord tissue from untreated RR-EAE mice when compared to control mice (fig. S1A and Fig. 2, D and E). However, aspirin treatment markedly suppressed the mRNA expression of iNOS and IL-1 in spinal cord tissue from mice with RR-EAE (fig. S1A and Fig. 2, D and E)."

    "...Additionally, recombinant human IL-11 markedly suppresses bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production from macrophages (35). Therefore, it is possible that IL-11 prevented conversion of Tregs in EAE mice by suppressing the production of NO."

    "...Here, we describe a new function of aspirin in which this drug inhibits the autoimmune disease EAE. Oral use of low-dose aspirin reduced the progression of both adoptively transferred and chronic EAE in mice. Aspirin treatment of mice with EAE also inhibited the invasion of mononuclear cells into the spinal cord as well as the expression of inflammatory molecules [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and IL-1] and restored myelination and the expression of myelin-specific genes within the CNS. A recent double-blind randomized controlled pilot trial suggests that aspirin may represent an effective pretreatment for exercise in MS (29). Fatigue is very common in MS, and low-dose aspirin is also being considered for treating MS-related fatigues (30). Here, our preclinical data suggest that low-dose aspirin may be repurposed for disease modification in MS patients.

    "...Although at high doses aspirin is reported to exhibit some toxic effects (gastric ulcers, stomach bleeding, tinnitus, etc.) (38), in our study aspirin suppressed the disease process of EAE at low doses (1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day). A single pill of baby aspirin containing 81 mg of aspirin is considered to be very much safe for adults for daily use, and the doses we used in mice are almost equivalent to baby aspirin."

    Lose-dose aspirin may help fight MS, study with mice says
    "...Although the findings are so far only in mice, studies suggest that aspirin -- even the "low-dose" variety -- might help counter multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis, or MS, is an autoimmune disorder where aberrant immune system T-cells attack and destroy the protective myelin protein sheath that coats nerves."

    "...For the study, Mondal's team fed aspirin to mice specially bred to mimic the human form of MS. The investigators found that even low doses of aspirin -- equal to the 81 milligram "baby aspirin" many take to ward off heart trouble -- seemed to curb symptoms of MS in the mice. What's more, the pain reliever seemed to push back the underlying disease itself. "

    "..."Although mouse results are not always translated to humans, our results highlight an undiscovered property of aspirin and suggest that low-dose aspirin may be repurposed for therapeutic intervention in MS," the study team wrote."
     
  2. chrismturner89

    chrismturner89 Member

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  3. dand

    dand Member

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    Going to buy a bunch of aspirin and then raise hell if they pull this bs. So depressing
     
  4. Fractality

    Fractality Member

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    Isn't aspirin derived from natural product like white willow bark which makes it unpatentable?
     
  5. Hugh Johnson

    Hugh Johnson Member

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    I swear to God, there is no way doctors manage to accidentally avoid every single method of curing MS.
     
  6. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    It does not have to be patentable. It can be perfectly natural and still be labelled as drug and pulled from OTC sales if a company spends money on a clinical trial proving benefit for a disease. The FDA has the authority to pull chemicals from the market to help financially the company which spent money to officially prove the benefit. Before that trial, any claims of benefit for chemical are considered untested and unproven and cannot officially be made by anybody, regardless of how strong the evidence is.
    It already happened with another natural, unpatentable chemical - pyridoxamine, which is one of the 3 naturally occurring isomers of vitamin B6. It is about to happen with biotin (MD1003) as a treatment for PPMS, and it can easily happen to aspirin.
    Pyridoxamine - Wikipedia
    "...Pyridoxamine was marketed as a dietary supplement, often as the hydrochloride salt, pyridoxamine dihydrochloride. However, in the United States, the FDA ruled in January 2009 that pyridoxamine must be regulated as a pharmaceutical drug because it is the active ingredient in Pyridorin, a drug designed by Biostratum, Inc., to prevent the progression of diabetic nephropathy.[9][10][11][12] Pyridorin had success in early clinical trials, found to be effective in slowing the progression of diabetic neuropathy in a phase II trial on 224 patients.[10] However, in 2005 Biostratum ran out of money and so was unable to begin a Phase III trial.[10] Investors in Biostratum had realized that because Biostratum had no patent on pyridoxamine itself, and that pyridoxamine was commonly available for purchase as a dietary supplement, the company would be unable to charge enough money for the treatment (should it be approved as a prescription drug by the FDA) for the investors to get a reasonable return on the investment they had already made (about $100M) much less on the additional investment a Phase III trial would require.[10] To solve this problem, Biostratum submitted a citizen petition to the FDA on July 29, 2005, seeking to disallow sales of pyridoxamine-containing supplements on the grounds that pyridoxamine, as the subject of an Investigational New Drug Application with the FDA, is a drug and not a dietary supplement.[10] This petition was opposed by the Council for Responsible Nutrition, a trade association of the dietary supplement industry.[10] On January 12, 2009, the FDA ruled that products containing pyridoxamine are excluded from the definition of dietary supplements as defined by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994.[11] The FDA stated that the status of Pyridorin as an investigational new drug, as a result of an application filed by BioStratum in July 1999 and effective on September 1, 1999, meant that "the marketing of pyridoxamine in a dietary supplement is essentially equivalent to the marketing of an investigational new drug as a dietary supplement" because there was an "absence of independent, verifiable evidence that the substance was marketed as a food or a dietary supplement prior to its authorization for investigation as a new drug."[13] In 2006, Biostratum licensed its rights in Pyridorin to another company, NephroGenex [14] In 2008, NephroGenex restarted the clinical development of Pyridorin, which as of 2012 is still ongoing.[15]"

    MD1003 (high-dose biotin) for the treatment of progressive multiple sclerosis: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study
     
  7. Vinero

    Vinero Member

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    Just want to mention that aspirin tablets 500 mg from Bayer that are available here in the Netherlands are sold out everywhere. I use 2 x 500 mg pills daily and all the stores are out of stock. I even tried to order online and even the online shops are all out of stock in the Netherlands. I wonder what might be going on? Maybe they want to make aspirin unavailable to the public since it is a threat to other (more profitable) pharmaceutical drugs?
     
  8. Soren

    Soren Member

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    They might be able to petition but surely when it comes to aspirin it is too generic and has been around too long for them to be successful. Would there not be a bunch of other companies that make aspirin that would seek to block this from happening.

    Mind you I would not put anything past the bankrupt, corrupt tyrannical institution that is the FDA and the government.
     
  9. ddjd

    ddjd Member

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    I'm next door in Germany and there's no shortage. Just drive over
     
  10. Vinero

    Vinero Member

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    Thanks. I might do that if Aspirin stays unavailable.
     
  11. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    They will simply strike a deal with those companies to give them a cut of the profits. I really don't know and hope it does not happen. All I am saying is that it has happened before for a naturally occurring, unpatentable ingredient and likely to happen again with biotin. So, aspirin is not beyound reach, especially if they strike a deal with a large manufacturer like Bayer and given them a cut of the profits.
     
  12. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I think they are trying to limit a supply of aspirin doses that have the potential to halt/treat/prevent cancer.
    It's Official - Aspirin Stops Breast Cancer In 80% Of Patients, Even Terminal Ones
    Aspirin Stops Breast Cancer; Reprograms Cancer Cells Into Normal

    Not sure if you saw the article by an investment banker saying the effects of aspirin on preventing/curing cancer can break pension systems. So, I am sure governments are taking notice and doing something to limit the supply of aspirin to us plebeians.
    Aspirin Seen Fueling $100 Billion Pensions Cost

    Btw, same thing happened with cyproheptadine in Europe. Used to be a widely available antiallergy syrup and pills for children, available OTC in most EU countries. Now, it is out of stock in every EU country I checked.
     
  13. Texon

    Texon Member

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    Could tart cherry juice extract have a similar effect or any other herbal source of salicylate?
     
  14. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Sure, any source of salicylate should work.
     
  15. Kyle Bigman

    Kyle Bigman Member

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    A colleague of mine has MS. I was going to recommend 81mg aspirin but, wouldn't higher dose (325mg) be better to avoid bleeding issues? You have said in the past that lower dose aspirin is more liable to cause those effects than high doses, paradoxically. Should I recommend the high dose instead?
     
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