Lithium And Thyroid

Discussion in 'Minerals' started by extremecheddar, Jan 20, 2014.

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  1. extremecheddar

    extremecheddar Member

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    Can low dose lithium (5mg) affect thyroid conversion.
    I understand it can but at what dose does this start to happen.
    I have a hair and urine essential mineral test showing low for lithium. Doc recommended i supp with lithium orotate for one year to replenish.
     
  2. OP
    extremecheddar

    extremecheddar Member

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    extremecheddar

    extremecheddar Member

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    Maybe my lithium "deficiency" is a good thing and i shouldn't bother with supplementing?
     
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    extremecheddar

    extremecheddar Member

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    Lithium toxicity can suppress thyroid and therefor increase serotonin synthesis? maybe low dose is key...
     
  5. Ben

    Ben Member

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    It mentioned serotonin increases in the hippocampus, maybe that's why lithium causes memory loss. I was interested in lithium for a while. It reduces suicide risk when put into drinking water of cities. It can interfere with thyroid hormone synthesis from iodine, but I already supplement thyroid, so it wouldn't make a difference. RP's opinion of lithium seemed positive since he compared it to sodium. Would anyone provide us with RP's opinion on lithium itself?
     
  6. 4peatssake

    4peatssake Member

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    Thyroid, insomnia, and the insanities: Commonalities in disease

    Iron's Dangers

    Ray also mentions lithium a few times in this article - one of my personal favorites.

    A Biophysical Approach to Altered Consciousness
     
  7. Ben

    Ben Member

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    A study which showed lithium extends longevity.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21301855

    If lithium's anti-thyroid effect outweighed it's positives, it would shorten lifespan because metabolic rate correlates with longevity. Maybe I'll give it a shot. There are supplements on amazon, of lithium carbonate, but they have fillers/binders. Maybe a salt can be synthesized from lithium metal, for example lithium carbonate could be made by adding baking soda, or lithium chloride by adding chlorine. I don't know about the availability of lithium metal, its dosage, solubility, various salts, etc. Dosage is particularly important because lithium is known for causing memory problems. I'll do some research.
     
  8. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

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    I recall reading the passages about lithium by Dr. Peat but the emphasis seemed largely that the (profit-driven) research on lithium benefits applied to the simpler, safer, more readily available sodium.

    I would suggest caution about lithium. Here's the admittedly arbitrary experience in people I know who have used lithium. I have seen a few modest benefits in a few using very small doses of lithium orotate nutrient capsules in place of the prescription lithium, for people with psychiatric situations and explicit, long term psychiatry diagnoses. I have known dozens who used the prescription lithium with marked side effects, including impaired kidney and/or thyroid function.

    Look up prescription lithium on the web:
    "Renal side effects including nephrogenic diabetes insipidus have been reported in as many as 50% of patients started on lithium."
    http://www.drugs.com/sfx/lithium-side-effects.html

    There are many kinds of side effects listed, though granted the commercial pharmaceutical replacements for lithium may be more profitable and skew the reporting.

    Yes, I would also welcome Dr. Peat's ideas about direct use of lithium.

    I remain cautious about alleged lithium deficiencies. Yes, there are a very few suggestive articles, For instance:

    -Schafer. Evaluation of beneficial and adverse effects on plants and animals following lithium deficiency and supplementation, and on humans following lithium treatment of mood disorders. Trace Elem Electrolytes. 29(2):91-112 (2012).
    -Schrauzer. Lithium: occurrence, dietary intakes, nutritional essentiality. J Am Coll. Nutr. 21:14-21 (2002).

    But it is not clear to me what reliable way there is of evaluating alleged low lithium, and how best to "replace" it. I have seen some of the alternative labs (such as hair & urine testing) give reports of levels with recommended ranges. I remain cautious.

    But this remains a substance available in food, with a fairly narrow range of safety and not so clear indications. IF there is a provisional recommendation for intake, it is in the range of one mg daily for an average sized adult. Many restorative measures discussed on the forum have clearer uses, theory, and safety.
     
  9. dukez07

    dukez07 Member

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    Interesting that lithium and sodium are described as being almost identical in their effects by RP, apart from one 'minor detail' - lithium, apparently decreases metabolic rate, but sodium increases it?

    I don't buy into the view that LO causes memory problems. It's a completely different game player, in comparison to its more widely used/prescribed brother (carbonate). LO is actually used as a nootropic by many over at ImmInst (just one example). When you are taking the carbonate, you are taking it in a dosage that is going to have the capability of causing memory issues. LO comes in
    a dosage format that is viewed, by some medical professionals, as being 'clinically insignificant'. They doubt whether it has any noticeable effects whatsoever. Perhaps that's why it's sold as a dietary supplement. Of course, LO is more concentrated, but 5mg is still nowhere near a prescribed dose of carbonate.

    When/if you get the lithium in your water supply, once again, the dose will be nowhere near that of a prescribed dose of carbonate. Comparing carbonate to LO is simply ridiculous.
     
  10. himsahimsa

    himsahimsa Member

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    Are you talking about L[sub]2[/sub]O? Lithium oxide. Or something else entirely?
     
  11. dukez07

    dukez07 Member

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    Hmmm. Maybe 'LO' isn't the correct term for lithium orotate (I honestly wouldn't have a clue), but yes, I am referring to Orotate.
     
  12. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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  13. ddjd

    ddjd Member

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  14. johnsmith

    johnsmith Member

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    @4peatssake
    A Biophysical Approach to Altered Consciousness
    "Sensitivity and imaginativeness are frequently attributed to alcoholics. (Newsweek, July 2, 1973, reported successful use of lithium salts to treat alcoholism; this could be interpreted as acting to depress the "dream process," lowering excitability."

    I don't know if i want to depress the dream process. Im on 150 mcg's right now.
     
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