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Linoleic Acid: Is This The Key That Unlocks The Quantum Brain?

Discussion in 'Polyunsaturated Fats, Seed Oils' started by Travis, Sep 28, 2017.

  1. Travis

    Travis Member

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    Cocchi, Massimo, et al. "Linoleic acid: Is this the key that unlocks the quantum brain? Insights linking broken symmetries in molecular biology, mood disorders and personalistic emergentism." BMC neuroscience 18.1 (2017): 38.

    A study was published early this year entitled, "
    Linoleic acid: Is this the key that unlocks the quantum brain? Insights linking broken symmetries in molecular biology, mood disorders and personalistic emergentism [sic]." This is not a joke. This was published in BioMed Central Neuroscience in April, and he cites the Peat-debunked Burr and Burr study:

    It looks like he's trying to model membrane fluidity as a function of temperature and electron spin orientation, and using a magnetic analogy to explain the parallel double-bond alignment. But unsaturated fatty acid bonds are only slightly polar, so he had better so this is probably better explained by
    anomeric effects.
    But it turns-out to be a put-on. The analogy was only intended to explain how a critical concentration of linoleic acid could act like an on/off switch, by using temperature and magnets (of all things.)

    So why linoleic acid? He never says. The brain has many different types of lipids. I don't think the physical properties of linoleic acid are particularly unusual considering the brain has fatty acids which have less, and have more, double-bonds. These are what create fluidity; double-bonds create kinks in the acyl chains.
    Oh! So this is why he automatically just assumes that linoleic acid would "unlock the quantum brain?" and not, say . . . palmitic acid which would be better-expected to lower membrane fluidity.

    There's actually a very good explanation for this: Both tryptophan — the serotonin precursor —and fatty acids compete for the same binding sites on serum albumin. There are five high-affinity tryptophan binding sites on serum albumin. Linoleic acid is the fatty acid which binds albumin, on average, most strongly.

    linoleate.png

    ...and displaces tryptophan from serum albumin raising brain serotonin synthesis (Fernstrom).
    It can't
    He's inspired by Penrose's microtubule quantum paper and proposes another, but goes for the Rube Goldberg approach.
    So the concentration of linoleic acid is imagined to strongly control the permeability of ion channels, controlling the quantity and quality of ions which stabilize – during assembly – the microtubules necessary for consciousness: yet no other fatty acid can do this.
    He didn't seem to properly think this through. He is using quantum woospeak, but he should probably confound the reader further by bringing a high-linoleic acid food into the analogy—like walnuts. You cannot unlock the quantum brain with these foods.
    No it's not. Linoleic acid raises serotonin in the brain by displacing tryptophan from serum albumin. It also is the only precursor for arachidonic acid, which is the only precursor of eicosanoids. These act on nuclear PPAR receptors to upregulate a suite of genes that shift the cell towards an fat-synthesizing, fat-storing, and subsequent insulin-resistant state. High amounts found in tissue are associated with cancer.§
    No.


    *Unsaturated fatty acids: Nutritionally essential, or toxic?
    †Spector, Arthur A. "Fatty acid binding to plasma albumin." Journal of lipid research 16.3 (1975): 165-179.
    ‡Curzon, G., June Friedel, and P. J. Knott. "The effect of fatty acids on the binding of tryptophan to plasma protein." Nature 242 (1973): 198-200.

    §Godley, Paul A., et al. "Biomarkers of essential fatty acid consumption and risk of prostatic carcinoma." Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Biomarkers 5.11 (1996): 889-895.
     
  2. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    Poor Sir Penrose
     
  3. Tarmander

    Tarmander Member

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    Marvelous
     
  4. schultz

    schultz Member

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    Linoleic acid, the key to lipofuscin filled lysosomes inhibiting the proteasome and causing cellular senescence. :eek:
     
  5. FredSonoma

    FredSonoma Member

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    anyone care to translate this to english
     
  6. OP
    Travis

    Travis Member

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    Reading that Cocchi article↑ will send anyone here into rant mode . . . after the mind-stunning shock wears-off.

    (You can't say that I didn't warn you.)

     
  7. Hugh Johnson

    Hugh Johnson Member

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    This is not a joke. This was published in BioMed Central Neuroscience in April
    April 1st?
     
  8. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    Well, he's only riding the same wagon Chris Masterjohn does.
    Chris seems well liked on this forum, of all places.
     
  9. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    Chris is driven by curiosity, unlike that other brain surgeon...
     
  10. OP
    Travis

    Travis Member

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    Chris Masterjohn seems to have omnivore bias. I read something, somewhere, that he had been sponsored at one time by the WAPF.* When I had first become aware of him. I didn't like him. I didn't like his attitude and demeanor shown in this video, and had questioned his motives.

    But he does seem a bit different now; he seems more independent, and the articles I saw seem logically-sound — but that's probably because I hadn't read them all.

    Even though he seems entirely independent, he might be hesitant to backtrack on his prior claims of when he was working for the WAPF* or whatever. People who make a name for themselves don't usually seem to like contradicting prior work. People who are ambivalent don't generally have much of a following; and since having a following appears to be his source of income at the moment, being ambivalent means not having much of a job.

    He's better than David Aprey, whose writings are nearly 70% total woo.


    He seems to create or explain molecular mechanisms within an omnivorous framework. I think Ray Peat's articles are better. It the area where their spheres of explanation may overlap [imagine 3-dimensional Venn diagram], Peat's understanding is likely more fundamentally-sound. Chris Masterjohn went to school at Champaign-Urbana. This is American's Heartland; an agricultural area. All you see around there are cornfields, and cows.

    *Impossible to track down the source for this. Consider it a rumor.
     
  11. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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  12. johnwester130

    johnwester130 Member

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    .................so I should start taking fish oil again ?
     
  13. OP
    Travis

    Travis Member

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    Didn't Ray Peat say that Burrs' rats suffered a B-vitamin deficiency? Ray knew very well about yeast as a source of these, and I don't see how he could have overlooked this:
    The same study is cited by both Ray Peat and Chris Masterjohn in the footnotes or their articles:

    Burr GO, Burr MM. A New Deficiency Disease Produced by the Rigid Exclusion of Fat from the Diet. J Biol Chem. 1929;82(2):345-367.

    This must be it ― the study which has "serendipitously" led to unknown cases of diabetes, prostate cancer, and and gunky cooking utensils. It has been cited 1318 times and was even reprinted in 1973, in the journal Nutrition Reviews.

    A Ctrl+F search gives 14 results for the term "yeast." This, or an extract, was obviously-used.
    But yeast contains (in one cup):
    yeast.png (click to embiggen)
    The Cronometer makes no mention of biotin (which was discovered by our friend Dean Burk) which, based on preliminary investigation, appears to be a vitamin for yeast.
    Which leads me to assume that yeast cannot synthesize it's own biotin. But since yeast cannot grow without it, dried yeast must contain some of it.
    yeast2.png (click to embiggen)
    This is five times lower that a standard Harlan–Tekand (formerly Harlan–Sprague-Dawley) rodent chow indicates, so even an all-yeast diet would be five times lower. There is no official human RDA. An informative online chat-box dialogue with a rodent nutritionist (ENVIGO + Helping customers secure the potential of life enhancing research and products | Envigo) is given below, verbatim:
    I think she's right about the biotin. I just found a study where they used both a suspension cage and egg-white to induce deficiency.​

    Heat damage could have been a factor. The B-vitamin complex used by Burrs' extract was heated, by definition, as a Soxhlet extractor cannot work without. Some B-vitamins are sensitive to heat.
    sensitivity.png (click to embiggen)
    ...namely, pantothenic acid and thiamine. But pyroxidine and niacin are sensitive to such things as, light, reducing agents, and pH. There are no details of the yeast vitamin-B extraction; and since they weren't even all known back then, they could have perhaps been a bit reckless with the procedure.​
    Quotes from Burr:

    Pellagra was my first thought too. He speaks about the lower-in-protein diets 550 A and 550 B as the higher "550", so just glancing at Table 1 appears to give the wrong impression. Perhaps he chose only to graph the lower-protein diets because the higher protein diets provided enough niacin derived from tryptophan?

    But besides niacin, both pyrixodine and biotin can produce similar skin manifestations. A deficiency in thiamine does not, this produces the more the neurological beriberi.

    Barthelemy, H., B. Chouvet, and F. Cambazard. "Skin and mucosal manifestations in vitamin deficiency." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 15.6 (1986): 1263-1274.
    So we have niacin, biotin, and pyroxidine as potential suspects based-on syptoms, but biotin-deficiency is unheard-of without egg albumin or antibiotics. It might seem as thought the very high-sugar and low-protein diet used (Table 1) could have accelerated the depletion – and increased the need – of niacin and/or pyroxidine. These deficiencies are commonly found associated with high-sucrose diets, but this is usually just explained by the fact that sucrose has no B-vitamins and eaten at the expense of that which does.

    I think Ray Peat was right about this. I have heard of similarly-induced B-vitamin deficiencies on high-sucrose diets. Such things appear in the writings of Shelton, Tilden, and other classic nutritionists.

    Although pellagra was well-known in 1929, it hadn't yet been proven to be caused by a vitamin deficiency. Many—and perhaps even most—people thought it was infectious; a microbial theory of pellagra was commonly presumed.

    *A Keanu Reeves "whoa." Not ― definitely not ― a Joey Lawrence "whoa."
    Masterjohn's Article
    Fats and degeneration
    §Unsaturated fatty acids: Nutritionally essential, or toxic?
    ¶Copping, Alice Mary, and Margaret Honora Roscoe. "The water-soluble B-vitamins in yeast, flour and bread." Biochemical Journal 31.10 (1937): 1879.
    ¶Oura, Erkki, and Heikki Suomalainen. "Biotin and the metabolism of baker's yeast." Journal of the Institute of Brewing 84.5 (1978): 283-287.

    Approximate years of discovery:
    B₁=1897 —— B₄≠exist —— B₇=1930s –– B₁₀≠exist
    B₂=1920 —— B₅=1933 —— B₈≠exist —— B₁₁≠exist
    B₃=1937 —— B₆=1934 —— B₉=1931 —— B₁₂=1920s


    (Ray Peat's point stands about most B-vitamins not being known before 1929. I just glanced at a study on B-vitamins in yeast from 1937, and only thaimine and flavin were even mentioned.)
     
  14. schultz

    schultz Member

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    Great post Travis. I especially liked the chat you had with the rodent nutritionist. Very smooth!

    Do you know what kind of yeast it was? I couldn't find much on the Northwestern Yeast Company, except that they sold a product called yeast foam which could be used to make rootbeer and other things. I assume it was bakers yeast?
     
  15. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  16. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    C'mon Dave don't make it worse :cool
     
  17. OP
    Travis

    Travis Member

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    I had no idea that root beer was actually fermented. I suppose this was one of the few ways of creating carbonation back in the day . .

    I was thinking about looking into the yeast, but had—and I ran out of coffee—decided that the controls got the exact same yeast. I think if I go down this rabbit hole some more, I will look into what high-sucrose diets do to B-vitamin levels. I know that B-vitamins are water-soluble, and that the metabolism of glucose creates more water than the metabolism of an isocaloric amount of fat. Perhaps it can be partially explained in this way? But probably only slightly . . .

    Bigger would probably be the higher activity of B-vitamin-dependent glycolytic enzymes which would necessarily create more free-radicals in close proximity to their co-factors—the B-vitamin coenzymes—causing superoxide adducts, ring scission, and divers other examples of oxidative damage.

    I'm sure this has been studied before. Sometimes it's just a matter of finding the right keywords . . .
     
  18. schultz

    schultz Member

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    I hope you do! Looking forward to it.

    Yes!!! I know what you mean. Sometimes the relevant paper has a title that you would not associate with the thing you're trying to search.
     
  19. Drareg

    Drareg Member

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    This is great read,thanks! @Travis

    Do you think water in the microtubules will be an issue with PUFA,from my limited understanding doesn’t water mix more with PUFA? Less so with saturated fat,now at individual fatty acid level I don’t know but for me it implies PUFA will not benefit structure and control of water,saturate fat will support a structure of water for example,my guess is water moving and shifting is involved with consciousness via control of electromagnetism?
    A crude experiment would be,mix protein,fat,water and apply heat,the ratios will create a structure of sort,differing ratios/different structures.
     
  20. opiath

    opiath Member

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    @Travis do you think that thiamine and riboflavin induce deficiencies in each other if not given together?
    I get something like that from this study: http://www.jbc.org/content/154/1/69.full.pdf

    Also here's a neat little diagram.
    It is missing some stuff (like b2 not showing in pyruvate -> AcetylCoA) but I find it useful.

    [​IMG]
     
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