Lamb?

Austin

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I noticed lamb on Danny Roddy's version of Peat's diet, as well as a few other versions. If I'm eating beef, liver, oysters, sole, and bone broth, is lamb really needed? I don't prefer to eat it for ethical reasons.

Thanks,
 
J

j.

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Probably having more variety would be main reason, since we restrict chicken and pork.
 

Ingenol

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j. said:
Probably having more variety would be main reason, since we restrict chicken and pork.
Additionally--at least here in the US--you can find grass-fed lamb, whereas it's virtually impossible in many areas to find chicken and pork that haven't been fed at least a significant amount of grains, or worse.
 

Austin

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Okay, thanks for the replies guys. So to clarify, there are no extra vits/minerals in lamb that I need that aren't found in the meat I listed above?
 
J

j.

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Austin said:
Okay, thanks for the replies guys. So to clarify, there are no extra vits/minerals in lamb that I need that aren't found in the meat I listed above?

I think that's right.
 

gabriel79

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Lamb is just a good substitute to beef, with goat being the other one. In same places it will be better fed too and less fatty.
 

Primal2Peat

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"Lamb" is usually a misnomer in the U.S.

You're not actually eating baby sheep. It's adult sheep, but the term "lamb" just sort of stuck here. It would be called "mutton" in Europe.

I'm not sure if that's your "ethical" problem with it, but just thought I would chime in with that.
 

gabriel79

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Didn't know. In my country, lamb is lamb (usually less than 20kg a whole animal)
 

charlie

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I think after they are one year old they are called sheep. Under a year, lamb.
 

Jenn

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Primal2Peat said:
"Lamb" is usually a misnomer in the U.S.

You're not actually eating baby sheep. It's adult sheep, but the term "lamb" just sort of stuck here. It would be called "mutton" in Europe.

I'm not sure if that's your "ethical" problem with it, but just thought I would chime in with that.

Yeah, you can certainly be eating baby sheep here in the US., baby goat too. Quite common (among those that eat goat ) to butcher bucklings at about 3-4 months of age or even younger. A two month old is like roasted chicken.
 

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