Labs - Tsh, High Cholesterol And Triglycerides

Discussion in 'Blood Work, Labs' started by SQu, Mar 14, 2014.

  1. SQu

    SQu Member

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    I seldom go to doctors but finally caved because I'd prefer to get thyroid meds that way. Previous tests were normal in spite of hypo symptoms. This time tsh - 4.5. Finally confirmation of what I've been feeling for so long. The doc is mainstream but nice and prepared to consider alternatives. But he is worried about my cholesterol - 290. Triglycerides 241. I know somewhat high cholesterol is good but Is this too high? I imagine a few months on fish oil and margarine would drop the numbers but I'm not prepared to damage my health that way. Or undo any of the hard won improvements from 8 months of peating. Any suggestions or input?

    Progesterone was 14.3 nmol/ L on day 23 of cycle - he called that high though range was 5.3 - 86 but I think it's because I'm 50 and he expected lower. Seems low to to me. But based on that and estradiol of 541 pmol /L (nice and high ;) ) he says I'm not peri menopausal. Nice news but for the wrong reasons IMO!
    DHEA bit low
    Cortisol 226/nmol /l fasting ( midrange)
    Vit d 25.2 ( 'moderate deficiency ')



    I'm feeling well, temps up, pulse good, sleeping better sometimes, sleep and weight the last things to improve
     
  2. OP
    SQu

    SQu Member

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    Continued...

    I've made a study of peat's articles and this forum so my questions are from a reasonably informed student! Just need to manage this doc issue. progesterone and pregnenolone ( started AFTER tests taken) ; aspirin, carrot, and all the other peaty stuff has done wonders so far, just need weight loss (a question for another day) and reassurance / direction on cholesterol and triglycerides and doctors! Thank you!!
    P.S. There are some other results too like HDL, LDL, that stuff. T3, T4, no rT3, testosterone, SHBG.
     
  3. OP
    SQu

    SQu Member

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    I did of course mention that I thought thyroid supplementation would help. He prescribed T4, I asked for T3 first, he's going to get back to me with that.
     
  4. OP
    SQu

    SQu Member

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    Apologies - edit - triglycerides are 241. Don't yet know how to edit. Will find out and edit post accordingly.
     
  5. jaguar43

    jaguar43 Member

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    Low thyroid.
     
  6. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

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    This is probably to high, especially if there are symptoms of low thyroid function. In the mid-20th century, one of the first thoughts about high cholesterol was low thyroid function. Now it's one of the last. Physicians have forgotten this knowledge, with other forces promoting profit-driven aims. Among other things, when thyroid function is boosted, fuel will be utilized better and the liver will more effectively process cholesterol.

    If the prescriber prefers not to go with T3, you might ask for one of the combinations, either synthetic (might have to be done with separate T4 & T3 pills) or the "Natural Dessicated Thyroid" preparations, like Armour, etc. You can read on this forum and elsewhere opinions about the different formulations.
     
  7. OP
    SQu

    SQu Member

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    Thank you. I'll look it up
     
  8. yoshiesque

    yoshiesque Member

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    You may have what I have, a rare (1 in 500 to 1 in 300) genetic disorder called familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    Basically it means that if you eat saturated fats or cholesterol rich products, your LDL will go crazy high. It's because one of the functions that remove cholesterol is partially/completely impaired. In this scenario, it means you need to be careful with foods high in saturated fats. I believe Chris Kresser put some information on his findings, and stated that in these situations, you need to eat monounsaturated fats like olive oil instead...while limited saturated fats.

    Not sure if you do have it though. I did notice triglycerides also go up too. But this would only happen if you were eating a lot of saturated fats. For me it happened the moment I switched from a diet that was high protein, low carb, low fat (fish oil only - i know bad!) to a high protein, high fat, low carb diet (fat was all saturated).

    Your parents would likely have some cholesterol issues too if you had this. You may not have it, I just wanted to put this out there because it does exist and is often overlooked.
     
  9. j.

    j. Guest

    Isn't there simply a lack of T3, since T3 helps conversion of cholesterol to other hormones? Have you tried using a T3 or T3/T4 supplement?
     
  10. HDD

    HDD Member

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    "By 1936, it was clear that hypercholesterolemia in humans and other animals was caused by hypothyroidism, and that hypothyroidism caused many diseases to develop, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. There was already more reason at that time to think that the increased cholesterol was a protective adaptation than to think that it was maladaptive."



    "In very young people, the metabolic rate is very high, and the rapid conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone, DHEA, and progesterone usually keeps the level of cholesterol in the blood low. In the 1930s, a rise in the concentration of cholesterol was considered to be one of the most reliable ways to diagnose hypothyroidism (1936 Yearbook of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Endocrinology, E.L. Sevringhaus, editor, Chicago, p. 533). With aging, the metabolic rate declines, and the increase of cholesterol with aging is probably a spontaneous regulatory process, supporting the synthesis of the protective steroids, especially the neurosteroids in the brain and retina. "

    http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/ch ... vity.shtml
     
  11. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

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    I do not mean to minimize the concern about inherited disorders. At the same time, I have seen this familial picture where added thyroid (primarily or including T3) reduced the cholesterol measurements in a short time. In one situation, this included parent and child both supplementing and succeeding at the same time. And long-standing health problems were relieved simultaneously.

    I am aware that different web authorities have different views. Adequate thyroid function is an afterthought for most. Despite the well-documented dangers of cholesterol-lowering agents, there is overblown fear of boosting thyroid function.
     
  12. yoshiesque

    yoshiesque Member

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    My T3 is always on the higher end naturally. I could try supplementing with it (and I just might some day). But I had perfectly good cholesterol levels until I added saturated fats (at large amounts). Also my mum has been diagnosed with it, due to cholesterol patches elevating under her eyes.

    I am sure T3 supplementation works, but in the situation where you do have a genetic disorder, i dont see how anything can fully compensate for an impaired function in the body.
     
  13. j.

    j. Guest

    I wonder if once your body is clean after 4 years of avoiding polyunsaturated fats whether your thyroid function will be able to deal with saturated fats.

    What do you consider an excessive cholesterol level? I think Peat thinks the ranges are wrong. There was a study of old people, maybe somebody else has a link, where the healthiest state was associated with a cholesterol of 250, 50 higher than the current upper end of normal.

    Also, Peat recommends for most using both T3 and T4, not just T3.
     
  14. yoshiesque

    yoshiesque Member

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    I would love to hope so, but when it comes to genetic disorders, where actual specific functions of the liver are missing/impaired....I find it hard to believe anything can be done about it (other than a liver transplant of course).


    My cholesterol levels were:

    S Cholesterol: 7.9 mmol/L (3.5 - 5.5)
    S Triglycerides: 1.2 mmol/L (<1.5)
    S HDL-Chol: 1.6 mmol/L (>1.00)
    S LDL-Chol: 5.7 mmol/L (<3.5)

    These are considered very high. I follow Chris Kresser's work on heart disease and he is more concerned about LDL particle size/count over Serum LDL. But when values are this high, its usually not good and represents some issue going on (ranges from thyroid to diabetes to gut disorders).

    This was on a gaps style diet for around 3-4 months. Which was bone broth, fatty grass fed red meats and grass fed butter. Occasional sweet potato, carrots and fruit juice.

    When I was on a high protein, low carb, low fat (fish oil) and plenty of veges diet I had the following:

    S Cholesterol: 5.0 mmol/L (3.5 - 5.5)
    S Triglycerides: 0.5 mmol/L (<1.5)
    S HDL-Chol: 1.7 mmol/L (>1.00)
    S LDL-Chol: 3.5 mmol/L (<3.5)

    I think the problem with Familial Hypercholesterolemia is that cholesterol stays in the body for a very long time so becomes more and more oxidized.

    I dont know for sure. Right now ive cut out the saturated fats. I dont plan on taking fish oil ever again either. I will experiment with just coconut oil once cholesterol returns to normal and see what it does.
     
  15. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    My cholesterol dropped pretty significantly on paleo and although the numbers looked stellar on paper I was anything but doing well. I think the cholesterol numbers are highly variable and a coherent understanding is sorely lacking in general and across the board on this topic. Obviously you are monitoring your numbers, just keep in mind there can be a counter balancing effect with any dietary change. As soon as I stopped the paleo diet my numbers immediately went back up to where they had been before which really was healthier for me. You may never fit into a neat and tidy box like we are often led to believe we should and that is okay. I think focusing on overall health by eating to optimize your metabolism is a good start. I have heard it takes 6 months after changing the diet to reflect in the numbers via testing but that was from a dietician so I'm not sure if it's true. I can't imagine that total/complete avoidance of saturated fat would be necessary especially something so wonderful as a little coconut oil. Sometimes I think if it wasn't for all the propaganda spread by big pharma to sell statins we wouldn't have all this confusion and fear mongering going on. In the 1970's the acceptable range at least in the U.S. was about 50% higher. The medical system changes numbers sometimes so more people fit there definition of sick and therefore think they need medical products and services. Just some thoughts. Good luck to you.
     
  16. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Yeh, I had a very loving family member let me know this weekend that I was going to clog my arteries and die from heart attack from eating the coconut oil. Well, at least they care! :lol:
     
  17. j.

    j. Guest

    Were you able to suppress the laughter?
     
  18. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    All I could say is "thank you for caring."
     
  19. j.

    j. Guest

    Without eye rolling?
     
  20. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    This person that told me this is very hard headed. There is just nothing else I could really do in that situation. If the square box doesn't tell them what to do, they wont do it.
     
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