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Jeez if the standard is set this low for a “debunking” then Im not sure any amount of info will remedy it.


Regardless, sunflower oil is specifically analyzed here.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cddk7DnBkDQ

thanks for this video, pretty informative and easy to understand.
Just couple thoughts...In real world we can not reduce everying to lipid peroxides/free radicals as a cause for all degenerative deseases , it is not even clear if they are a real cause or just byproducts. There is not enough evidence to say that inhibiting their formation can really prevent or change the course of desease. Or it can be even the other way around, free radicals help to kill damaged cells or things like ferroptosis . It is believed , at low or moderate levels, ROS exert beneficial effects on cellular responses and immune function. At high concentrations, they generate oxidative stress, a deleterious process that can damage cell structures,

Lipid peroxides are an important class of biomolecules generated by oxidative stress in cells. Though lipid peroxides have been observed in multiple disease states, it is often unclear to what extent they initiate disease or are the downstream products of other disease-promoting factors. Similarly, it remains to be determined what role general cellular processes like ferroptosis play in specific disease contexts such as Alzheimer's. Nonetheless, an increasing understanding how lipid peroxidation can be controlled is expected to have significant medical impact. For cancers that have evolved mechanisms to evade apoptotic signals, induction of lipid peroxidation and ferroptosis may provide a therapeutic alternative to current chemotherapeutic options. Similarly, despite the failures of vitamin E (and vit C) therapy in Alzheimer's disease, developing better techniques to prevent the oxidative stress accompanied by neurodegeneration has the potential to offer new therapeutic options.

In this study :
We conclude that supplementation with vitamins E and C did not have a significant effect on the course of AD over 1 year despite of a limited antioxidant effect that could be observed in CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) . CSF antioxidant vitamins were significantly increased after 1 month and 1 year of supplementation, while in vitro oxidation of CSF lipids was significantly reduced only after 1 year of the supplementation.
 
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This is not a "debunking". She doesn't offer any evidence for her claims.
She shared her opinion whether we like it or not. What evidence do you need ? She will probably tell you those are the basics of bio chemistry that you can find thoroughly described in a text book.
 
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Mitochondria converts saturated fat into unsaturated fat through the beta oxidation cycle , 6 step process, within which you create free-radical damage , that is radical oxidative species which damage your DNA within cells . Now you know why you have aging , gray hair , cancer ...
We alter our DNA because we have these free radicals because we had to turn bad fat (saturated) into a good fat (unsaturated)...
I think she refers to this scheme ( beta oxidation ) :

1. Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase catalyzes dehydrogenation of the acyl-CoA, creating a double bond between the alpha and beta carbons.[6] FAD is the hydrogen acceptor, yielding FADH2.
beta_oxidation_process-png.62576



2. Enoyl-CoA hydrase catalyzes the addition of water across the newly formed double bond to make an alcohol.[5][6]

3. 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase oxidizes the alcohol group to a ketone.[5] NADH is produced from NAD+.[6]

4. Thiolase cleaves between the alpha carbon and ketone to release one molecule of Acetyl-CoA and the Acyl-CoA which is now 2 carbons shorter.[6]

This four step process repeats until acyl-CoA has removed all carbons from the chain, leaving only Acetyl-CoA. During one cycle of beta oxidation, Acyl-CoA creates one molecule of Acetyl-CoA, FADH2, and NADH.[7] Acetyl-CoA is then used in the citric acid cycle while FADH2 and NADH are sent to the electron transport chain.[8] These intermediates all end up providing energy for the body as they are ultimately converted to ATP.[8]

Beta oxidation, as well as alpha-oxidation, also occurs in the peroxisome.[1] The peroxisome handles beta oxidation of fatty acids that have more than 20 carbons in their chain because the peroxisome contains very-long-chain Acyl-CoA synthetases.[9] These enzymes are better equipped to oxidize Acyl-CoA with long chains that the mitochondria cannot handle.

Example using stearic acid (see above)​

Beta oxidation removes 2 carbons at a time, so in the oxidation of an 18 carbon fatty acid such as Stearic Acid 8 cycles will need to occur to completely break down Acyl-CoA.[9] This will produce 9 Acetyl-CoA that have 2 carbons each, 8 FADH2, and 8 NADH.
 

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Peater

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salted in order to help and break those double bonds in fats.

Would this not also apply to VA?

"“Vitamin A” refers to a group of molecules that are structurally related to retinol, which consists of a β-ionone ring and an isoprenoid “tail” containing four conjugated double bonds and a terminal hydroxyl group."

Interesting that Ray did not have much bad to say about salt, compared to the mainstream.

I believe Grant said he just ate a fairly standard healthy diet - I wonder if it was low salt (Cos it's healthy!), of course the VA-"fortified" milk was a big deleterious factor.
 
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So far we know that grey hair is caused by:

Low copper
High copper
Saturated fat
PUFA

:crazy:

lightbox_634399814672620000837237_27_cesselstynresselstyn_050211_177-jpeg.62579

Look at these (no fat /no oil/no nuts/no caffeine/no salt) guys. They don't need introduction, 90 and 61 yo... both with hair but lost all the color. I bet they would benefit from Karen Hurd approach. All the greens they eat haven't helped them though. I mean very low fat diet doesn't protect hair from greying. Upping saturated fats will likely lead rather to hair loss through DHT/testosterone ( just kidding here:) ) . Yet , adding those omega 3 oils worked on Karen. But she also eats lean meat, eggs, poultry, fish, and seafood.

Also interesting what Dr. Paul Eck (clinician, physician and biochemist ) said on this:

It’s the minerals in your body that give your hair its color. For example, hair (especially black hair) gets its color from the minerals manganese and iron.
Manganese and iron are two minerals your cells need to produce energy. When people become exhausted, it means they are usually low on manganese and iron. When these two minerals become depleted in the body, they also become depleted in the hair. Then the hair loses its color.
But what makes hair actually acquire a white color? This is caused by two other minerals, calcium and zinc. These are the minerals that deposit in your hair as your body becomes exhausted. As you know, calcium is white. So is zinc. In fact, zinc oxide is a popular white pigment. It is used, for instance, in the white ointment that lifeguards use to protect their noses from sunburn. As these two minerals accumulate in your tissues, and therefore in your hair, the hair then turns the same color as the minerals in it – in this case, white.
If your sodium and potassium levels go too low, it means there is not enough solvent left in your body. So your minerals begin to drop out of solution. They
precipitate. They begin to pile up in your tissues, arteries, joints, your heart, your skin, etc. You become less flexible. In other words, you age prematurely.
 

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But what makes hair actually acquire a white color? This is caused by two other minerals, calcium and zinc. These are the minerals that deposit in your hair as your body becomes exhausted. As you know, calcium is white. So is zinc. In fact, zinc oxide is a popular white pigment. It is used, for instance, in the white ointment that lifeguards use to protect their noses from sunburn. As these two minerals accumulate in your tissues, and therefore in your hair, the hair then turns the same color as the minerals in it – in this case, white.
Follicles being bleached by H2O2 is what causes hair to go white.
 
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Follicles being bleached by H2O2 is what causes hair to go white.
Yeah, maybe smth along these lines: :crazy:
Overproduction of copper-zinc superoxidase induces excessive H2O2 formation and triggers oxidative damage. Accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) imposes significant oxidative stresses on both bulbar melanocytes per se and the highly proliferative hair bulb epithelium (consisting of keratinocytes)11. Inflammation, ultraviolet light, cigarette smoking, psychoemotional stress, certain chemicals, and genetic defects may trigger oxidative stress, inducing graying12,13,14. It was suggested that graying may be caused by reduced tyrosinase activity in bulbar melanocytes or an abnormal interaction, melanosomes transfer, between these melanocytes and the cortical keratinocytes of hair bulbs12,15. Also, graying may result from insufficient melanocyte migration from the reservoir (the hair bulge) of the upper outer root sheath (ORS) to the hair bulb lying closest to the dermal papilla5. The levels of both anti-apoptotic factors (including BCL-2) and melanogenic enzymes (TRP-1 and TRP-2) are valuable markers of graying. The mitochondrion is the primary target of oxidative stressors, compromising energy production. Thus, a mitochondrial theory of aging was suggested to explain hair graying13.
Melanin transfer from melanocytes to cortical keratinocytes may reduce keratinocyte proliferation and increase terminal keratinocyte differentiation, probably by modulating intracellular calcium levels16,17. The growth rate of non-pigmented (white) beard hair is greater than that of adjacent pigmented hair18. Melanin granules transferred to keratinocytes may serve as regulatory packages, controlling cell differentiation and metabolic status19,20. Together, the data suggest that non-pigmented (white) hairs may grow more rapidly and become thicker than pigmented hairs, due to an absence of melanin in bulbar keratinocytes. Active hair growth of white hairs may be considered as a result, not cause, of hair graying.
Interestingly, graying is sometimes reversed even in the elderly. For example, some non-pigmented (white) hairs begin to produce melanin once more after exposure to radiation or cytokines, becoming proximally pigmented. One explanation is that melanocytes negative for 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and most melanocyte-specific makers remain in the ORSs of white hairs and begin to produce pigment after stimulation30,31.

 

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Yeah, maybe smth along these lines: :crazy:
Overproduction of copper-zinc superoxidase induces excessive H2O2 formation and triggers oxidative damage. Accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) imposes significant oxidative stresses on both bulbar melanocytes per se and the highly proliferative hair bulb epithelium (consisting of keratinocytes)11. Inflammation, ultraviolet light, cigarette smoking, psychoemotional stress, certain chemicals, and genetic defects may trigger oxidative stress, inducing graying12,13,14. It was suggested that graying may be caused by reduced tyrosinase activity in bulbar melanocytes or an abnormal interaction, melanosomes transfer, between these melanocytes and the cortical keratinocytes of hair bulbs12,15. Also, graying may result from insufficient melanocyte migration from the reservoir (the hair bulge) of the upper outer root sheath (ORS) to the hair bulb lying closest to the dermal papilla5. The levels of both anti-apoptotic factors (including BCL-2) and melanogenic enzymes (TRP-1 and TRP-2) are valuable markers of graying. The mitochondrion is the primary target of oxidative stressors, compromising energy production. Thus, a mitochondrial theory of aging was suggested to explain hair graying13.
Melanin transfer from melanocytes to cortical keratinocytes may reduce keratinocyte proliferation and increase terminal keratinocyte differentiation, probably by modulating intracellular calcium levels16,17. The growth rate of non-pigmented (white) beard hair is greater than that of adjacent pigmented hair18. Melanin granules transferred to keratinocytes may serve as regulatory packages, controlling cell differentiation and metabolic status19,20. Together, the data suggest that non-pigmented (white) hairs may grow more rapidly and become thicker than pigmented hairs, due to an absence of melanin in bulbar keratinocytes. Active hair growth of white hairs may be considered as a result, not cause, of hair graying.
Interestingly, graying is sometimes reversed even in the elderly. For example, some non-pigmented (white) hairs begin to produce melanin once more after exposure to radiation or cytokines, becoming proximally pigmented. One explanation is that melanocytes negative for 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and most melanocyte-specific makers remain in the ORSs of white hairs and begin to produce pigment after stimulation30,31.

Very interesting.

Please don't expect me to believe that "calcium is white. So is zinc...therefore in your hair, the hair then turns the same color as the minerals in it – in this case, white" is basically saying the same thing but I was too stupid to get it, though.
 
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Very interesting.

Please don't expect me to believe that "calcium is white. So is zinc...therefore in your hair, the hair then turns the same color as the minerals in it – in this case, white" is basically saying the same thing but I was too stupid to get it, though.
It is not me saying that , I only cited Dr. Paul Eck . I'm not sure about his credentials , I learned about him on Ray Peat forum. Some of the stuff he talks about is in line with RP work. I attached his book if someone is interested. He is a guy who invented or promoted the idea of slow and fast oxidizers, hair mineral test, and he has many followers.

"Dr. Paul C. Eck (1925-1996) was a brilliant clinician, physician and biochemist and spent most of his adult life evaluating major research studies in biochemistry, physiology, pathology, nutrition and psychology.
To correctly interpret a tissue mineral analysis, Dr. Eck combined a number of modern biological, physiological and biochemical concepts. These concepts include the stages of stress discovered by Dr. Hans Selye, sympathetic and parasympathetic balancing as taught by Dr. Melvin Page, oxidation types as taught by Dr. George Watson and mineral balancing as taught by Dr. William Albrecht and others.
In 1974, Dr. Paul Eck established Analytical Research Laboratories (ARL) for hair tissue mineral analysis. In 1975, he founded Endomet Laboratories which offers nutritional products for mineral balancing.
Dr. Eck pioneered many innovations in the study of trace mineral deficiencies and excesses and their relationship to various metabolic dysfunctions associated with disease. Dr. Eck was regarded as an authority on the unique science of balancing body chemistry through hair tissue mineral analysis. "
 

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The Interviewer did not let Karen answer the question on PCOS, Karen only explained it's High Testosterone, but did not let Karen answer how to fix it.
 

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The Interviewer did not let Karen answer the question on PCOS, Karen only explained it's High Testosterone, but did not let Karen answer how to fix it.
Prevent the hepatic recirculation of bile (that contains hormones like estrogen, testosterone and so on) by eating soluble fiber.
 

mosaic01

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She shared her opinion whether we like it or not.

Yes, it's a valid opinion, just like any other. But it's not really evidence and thus it's not worth more than any other opinion.

She needs to provide population data, historical analysis, studies, arguments.

For example, the countries with the highest saturated fat consumption should have the highest cancer rates. But this is not the case. In contrast, we see the highest cancer rates in countries with a high intake of cod liver oil, liver, retinol, and PUFA rich fish, and not much sunshine.

Finland hast the highest Dementia rate in the world. Denmark hast the highest cancer rate.

Sri Lanka has the second highest coconut consumption worldwide and among the lowest cancer rates.

Our bodies consist mostly of saturated and mono-unsaturated, why would they prefer PUFA?
 
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Yes, it's a valid opinion, just like any other. But it's not really evidence and thus it's not worth more than any other opinion.

She needs to provide population data, historical analysis, studies, arguments.

For example, the countries with the highest saturated fat consumption should have the highest cancer rates. But this is not the case. In contrast, we see the highest cancer rates in countries with a high intake of cod liver oil, liver, retinol, and PUFA rich fish, and not much sunshine.

Finland hast the highest Dementia rate in the world. Denmark hast the highest cancer rate.

Sri Lanka has the second highest coconut consumption worldwide and among the lowest cancer rates.

Our bodies consist mostly of saturated and mono-unsaturated, why would they prefer PUFA?
Finland and Denmark also have the highest dairy consumption, also coffee (According to various statistics, Finland is the #1 coffee-consuming country in the world).
On the contrary , islanders icluding Japan , that consumed fish and pork had always been considered healthy .
Also different types of carbs, reliance on processed vs whole foods
I read Sri Lanka doesn't use coconut oil as it used before and basicaly moved to a western diet. It is not just they started using PUFA oils but processed/refined foods in general.
Cooking technique is also important . Frying in olive oil (or butter) is probably the worst. Look at the charts with AGEs formation in different foods.
Also mold growth during storage, I recently descovered some black mold inside the jar with the residues of coconut oil. Mycotoxins are no joke. Coffee is also prone to accumulating mycotoxins btw.
Finland and Denmark may just have more older people. Same as Japan - high dementia prevalence due to high number of old people.


Environmental factors . I find this abstract interesting:

Finland has the highest death rate from dementia in the world and its environmental features can be instructive in understanding hidden causes of dementia. Environmental factors there include:
1) a climate that is both very cold and humid resulting in housing frequently harboring molds that are capable of producing a neurotoxic mycotoxin
2) the Gulf of Finland as well as Finnish lakes harbor cyanobacteria that produce the neurotoxin, beta-N-methyl amino-L-alanine, known to cause dementia and related disorders
3) the aforementioned toxins can be potentiated by the presence of mercury and methyl mercury which can be found in Finnish waters

4) soil in Finland is naturally low in selenium and selenium deficiency may reduce the quantity and effectiveness of glutathione's ability to protect against neurotoxins. A high rate of fatal dementia could be the consequence of these environmental factors. Studies that can support or disprove this hypothesis are suggested. Such environmental toxins are likely to promote Alzheimer's disease elsewhere in the world where such a combination of neurotoxins may also occur.
 
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I wonder if the high B1/thiamine content of pork is a natural VA 'counter measure'.
 
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Considerations: for high temperature cooking, select cooking oils with a high smoke point. For low temperature cooking, or adding to dishes and salad dressings, choose oils with higher Omega-3 fatty acids since they promote healthy cells and decrease stroke and heart attack risk. They are also known for their anti-inflammatory action. Although you need Omega-6 fatty acids to maintain cell wall integrity and provide energy for the heart, too much Omega-6 fatty acid can increase inflammation in the body. Also, cooking oils that are high in Omega 9 may provide some health benefit. Omega-9 fatty acids are considered to be "conditionally essential," which means that although your body produces them, they aren't produced in meaningful quantities. Consuming Omega-9 fatty acids such as oleic acid lowers the risk of heart attacks, arteriosclerosis, and may aid in cancer prevention.

So, what should you look for in an optimal oil? Low Omega 6:Omega 3 ratio (< 10:1), low in saturated fat, high in Omega 9 and non-GMO. As you will see in the chart below, olive oil meets these healthy criteria much more than other oils. Canola oil can also be a good choice for higher temperature cooking, but it should be expeller-pressed and non-GMO if possible.
Cooking Oils / Fats​
Smoke Point °CSmoke Point °FOmega-6: Omega-3 Ratio
(plus other relevant fat information)
Flaxseed oil​
107°C​
225°F​
1:4​
Safflower oil​
107°C​
225°F​
133:1​
Sunflower oil​
107°C​
225°F​
40:1​
Corn oil​
160°C​
320°F​
83:1​
High-oleic sunflower oil​
160°C​
320°F​
40:1, 84% monosaturated​
Extra virgin olive oil
160°C​
320°F​
9:1, Low in Saturated fat, 73% monounsaturated, high in Omega 9​
Semirefined safflower oil​
160°C​
320°F​
133:1, (75% Omega 9)​
Soy oil​
160°C​
320°F​
8:1 (most are GMO)​
Walnut oil
160°C​
320°F​
5:1​
Hemp seed oil​
165°C​
330°F​
3:1​
Butter​
177°C​
350°F​
Very little Omegas, mostly saturated fat​
Canola oil
177°C​
350°F​
2:1, [ (56% Omega 9), 80% Canola is GMO.]​
Coconut oil​
177°C​
350°F​
86% saturated fat, lauric acid. Not considered a healthy choice. Claimed to have MCTs that are healthier for you, but the science does not support this​
Sesame oil​
177°C​
350°F​
138:1​
Semirefined soy oil​
177°C​
350°F​
8:1​
Vegetable shortening​
182°C​
360°F​
mostly unhealthy saturated, Trans Fat​
Lard​
182°C​
370°F​
11:1 high in saturated fat​
Macadamia nut oil​
199°C​
390°F​
1:1, 80% monounsaturated, (83% Omega-9)​
Canola oil (Expeller Pressed)
200°C​
400°F​
2:1, 62% monounsaturated, 32% polyunsaturated​
Refined canola oil​
204°C​
400°F​
3:1, 80% of Canola in US in GMO.​
Semirefined walnut oil​
204°C​
400°F​
5:1​
High quality (low acidity) extra virgin olive oil
207°C​
405°F​
9:1, 74% monosaturated (71.3% Omega 9)​
Sesame oil​
210°C​
410°F​
42:1​
Cottonseed oil​
216°C​
420°F​
54:1​
Grapeseed oil​
216°C​
420°F​
676:1, (12% saturated, 17% monounsaturated)​
Virgin olive oil​
216°C​
420°F​
13:1, 74% monosaturated (71.3% Omega 9)​
Almond oil​
216°C​
420°F​
Omega-6 only​
Hazelnut oil​
221°C​
430°F​
75% monosaturated (no Omega 3, 78% Omega 9)​
Peanut oil​
227°C​
440°F​
32:1​
Sunflower oil​
227°C​
440°F​
40:1​
Refined corn oil​
232°C​
450°F​
83:1​
Palm oil​
232°C​
450°F​
46:1, mostly saturated and monosaturated​
Palm kernel oil​
232°C​
450°F​
82% saturated (No Omega 3)​
Refined high-oleic sunflower oil​
232°C​
450°F​
39:1, 84% monosaturated​
Refined peanut oil​
232°C​
450°F​
32:1​
Semirefined sesame oil​
232°C​
450°F​
138:1​
Refined soy oil​
232°C​
450°F​
8:1 (most are GMO)​
Semirefined sunflower oil​
232°C​
450°F​
40:1​
Olive pomace oil​
238°C​
460°F​
74% monosaturated, high in Omega 9​
Extra light olive oil
242°C​
468°F​
9:1, 74% monosaturated, high in Omega 9​
Rice Bran Oil​
254°C​
490°F​
21:1, Good source of vitamin E & antioxidants​
Refined Safflower oil​
266°C​
510°F​
133:1 (74% Omega 9)​
Avocado oil​
271°C​
520°F​
12:1, 70% monosaturated, (68% Omega-9 fatty acids)
High in vitamin E.​
 
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Ainaga

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Considerations: for high temperature cooking, select cooking oils with a high smoke point. For low temperature cooking, or adding to dishes and salad dressings, choose oils with higher Omega-3 fatty acids since they promote healthy cells and decrease stroke and heart attack risk. They are also known for their anti-inflammatory action. Although you need Omega-6 fatty acids to maintain cell wall integrity and provide energy for the heart, too much Omega-6 fatty acid can increase inflammation in the body. Also, cooking oils that are high in Omega 9 may provide some health benefit. Omega-9 fatty acids are considered to be "conditionally essential," which means that although your body produces them, they aren't produced in meaningful quantities. Consuming Omega-9 fatty acids such as oleic acid lowers the risk of heart attacks, arteriosclerosis, and may aid in cancer prevention.

So, what should you look for in an optimal oil? Low Omega 6:Omega 3 ratio (< 10:1), low in saturated fat, high in Omega 9 and non-GMO. As you will see in the chart below, olive oil meets these healthy criteria much more than other oils. Canola oil can also be a good choice for higher temperature cooking, but it should be expeller-pressed and non-GMO if possible.
Cooking Oils / Fats​
Smoke Point °CSmoke Point °FOmega-6: Omega-3 Ratio
(plus other relevant fat information)
Flaxseed oil​
107°C​
225°F​
1:4​
Safflower oil​
107°C​
225°F​
133:1​
Sunflower oil​
107°C​
225°F​
40:1​
Corn oil​
160°C​
320°F​
83:1​
High-oleic sunflower oil​
160°C​
320°F​
40:1, 84% monosaturated​
Extra virgin olive oil
160°C​
320°F​
9:1, Low in Saturated fat, 73% monounsaturated, high in Omega 9​
Semirefined safflower oil​
160°C​
320°F​
133:1, (75% Omega 9)​
Soy oil​
160°C​
320°F​
8:1 (most are GMO)​
Walnut oil
160°C​
320°F​
5:1​
Hemp seed oil​
165°C​
330°F​
3:1​
Butter​
177°C​
350°F​
Very little Omegas, mostly saturated fat​
Canola oil
177°C​
350°F​
2:1, [ (56% Omega 9), 80% Canola is GMO.]​
Coconut oil​
177°C​
350°F​
86% saturated fat, lauric acid. Not considered a healthy choice. Claimed to have MCTs that are healthier for you, but the science does not support this​
Sesame oil​
177°C​
350°F​
138:1​
Semirefined soy oil​
177°C​
350°F​
8:1​
Vegetable shortening​
182°C​
360°F​
mostly unhealthy saturated, Trans Fat​
Lard​
182°C​
370°F​
11:1 high in saturated fat​
Macadamia nut oil​
199°C​
390°F​
1:1, 80% monounsaturated, (83% Omega-9)​
Canola oil (Expeller Pressed)
200°C​
400°F​
2:1, 62% monounsaturated, 32% polyunsaturated​
Refined canola oil​
204°C​
400°F​
3:1, 80% of Canola in US in GMO.​
Semirefined walnut oil​
204°C​
400°F​
5:1​
High quality (low acidity) extra virgin olive oil
207°C​
405°F​
9:1, 74% monosaturated (71.3% Omega 9)​
Sesame oil​
210°C​
410°F​
42:1​
Cottonseed oil​
216°C​
420°F​
54:1​
Grapeseed oil​
216°C​
420°F​
676:1, (12% saturated, 17% monounsaturated)​
Virgin olive oil​
216°C​
420°F​
13:1, 74% monosaturated (71.3% Omega 9)​
Almond oil​
216°C​
420°F​
Omega-6 only​
Hazelnut oil​
221°C​
430°F​
75% monosaturated (no Omega 3, 78% Omega 9)​
Peanut oil​
227°C​
440°F​
32:1​
Sunflower oil​
227°C​
440°F​
40:1​
Refined corn oil​
232°C​
450°F​
83:1​
Palm oil​
232°C​
450°F​
46:1, mostly saturated and monosaturated​
Palm kernel oil​
232°C​
450°F​
82% saturated (No Omega 3)​
Refined high-oleic sunflower oil​
232°C​
450°F​
39:1, 84% monosaturated​
Refined peanut oil​
232°C​
450°F​
32:1​
Semirefined sesame oil​
232°C​
450°F​
138:1​
Refined soy oil​
232°C​
450°F​
8:1 (most are GMO)​
Semirefined sunflower oil​
232°C​
450°F​
40:1​
Olive pomace oil​
238°C​
460°F​
74% monosaturated, high in Omega 9​
Extra light olive oil
242°C​
468°F​
9:1, 74% monosaturated, high in Omega 9​
Rice Bran Oil​
254°C​
490°F​
21:1, Good source of vitamin E & antioxidants​
Refined Safflower oil​
266°C​
510°F​
133:1 (74% Omega 9)​
Avocado oil​
271°C​
520°F​
12:1, 70% monosaturated, (68% Omega-9 fatty acids)
High in vitamin E.​
you say frying in butter and olive oil is probably the worst. yet high quality low acidity evoo has a smoke point of 405F, higher than coconut, butter, and lard. hemp seed is a tad higher, although it's a high omega-3 oil. non-extra virgin olive oil has an even higher smoke point at 420F. but then several high omega-6 oils have even higher smoke points. how does that work?
a note in passing, before covid, i was the cook in a small restaurant called plátanos in ikaría, greece, you know, one of the purported blue zones. meaning, i know firsthand what food is like there. most of the oil consumed on the island (except maybe in the summers when the population explodes and there isn't enough oil or wine for everyone) is pressed from olives that grow on the island. this is done in a communal press. and here's the jist, the oil is not extra virgin. during extraction, some heat is applied to it.
 
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Apple

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you say frying in butter and olive oil is probably the worst. yet high quality low acidity evoo has a smoke point of 405F, higher than coconut, butter, and lard. hemp seed is a tad higher, although it's a high omega-3 oil. non-extra virgin olive oil has an even higher smoke point at 420F. but then several high omega-6 oils have even higher smoke points. how does that work?
a note in passing, before covid, i was the cook in a small restaurant called plátanos in ikaría, greece, you know, one of the purported blue zones. meaning, i know firsthand what food is like there. most of the oil consumed on the island (except maybe in the summers when the population explodes and there isn't enough oil or wine for everyone) is pressed from olives that grow on the island. this is done in a communal press. and here's the jist, the oil is not extra virgin. during extraction, some heat is applied to it.
If you take into consideration AGEs formation during cooking things look especially bad for butter, anything with fried eggs and cheeses.
There is controversial info on olive oil fresh or heated. According to charts it is high in AGEs. Not sure how heating affects it.
Oil, olive - 11,900 (AGE Content)
Oil, sunflower - 3,940
Oil, corn - 2,400
Oil, safflower - 3,020
High polyphenol level in olive oil may counteract AGEs effects.
I think coconut oil is ok for frying/baking since it may inhibit AGE formation. In this study : Saturated fatty acids, medium-chain triacylglycerols (MCTs), had a remarkable inhibitory effect on the amount of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) generated from the Maillard reaction in bread baking compared to unsaturated fatty acids.



The advanced glycation end product (AGE) in foods

AGE Content​

Food item​
AGEa kU/100g​
Serving size (g)​
AGE kU/serving​
Fats
Almonds, blanched slivered (Bazzini’s Nut Club, Bronx, NY)​
5,473​
30​
1,642​
Almonds, roasted​
6,650​
30​
1,995​
Avocado​
1,577​
30​
473​
Butter, whippedb​
26,480​
5​
1,324​
Butter, sweet cream, unsalted, whipped (Land O’Lakes, St Paul, MN)​
23,340​
5​
1,167​
Cashews, raw (Bazzini’s Nut Club)​
6,730​
30​
2,019​
Cashews, roasted​
9,807​
30​
2,942​
Chestnut, raw​
2,723​
30​
817​
Chestnut, roasted, in toaster oven 350°F for 27 min​
5,353​
30​
1,606​
Cream cheese, Philadelphia soft, (Kraft, Northfield, IL)​
10,883​
30​
3,265​
Cream cheese, Philadelphia original (Kraft)​
8,720​
30​
2,616​
Margarine, tub​
17,520​
5​
876​
Margarine, tub, I Can’t Believe it’s Not Butter (Unilever, Rotterdam, The Netherlands)​
9,920​
5​
496​
Margarine, tub, Smart Balance (CFA Brands, Heart Beat Foods, Paramus, NJ)​
6,220​
5​
311​
Margarine, tub, Take Control (Unilever Best Foods)​
4,000​
5​
200​
Mayonnaise​
9,400​
5​
470​
Mayonnaise, imitation (Diet Source, Novartis Nutriton Group, East Hanover, NJ)​
200​
5​
10​
Mayonnaise, low fat (Hellman’s, Unilever Best Foods)​
2,200​
5​
110​
Olive, ripe, large (5 g)​
1,670​
30​
501​
Peanut butter, smooth, Skippy (Unilever)​
7,517​
30​
2,255​
Peanuts, cocktail (Planters, Kraft)​
8,333​
30​
2,500​
Peanuts, dry roasted, unsalted (Planters, Kraft)​
6,447​
30​
1,934​
Peanuts, roasted in shell, salted (Frito-Lay, Plano, TX)​
3,440​
30​
1,032​
Pine nuts (pignolias), raw (Bazzini’s Nut Club)​
11,210​
30​
3,363​
Pistachios, salted (Frito Lay)​
380​
30​
114​
Pumpkin seeds, raw, hulled (House of Bazzini, Bronx, NY)​
1,853​
30​
556​
Soybeans, roasted and salted (House of Bazzini)​
1,670​
30​
501​
Sunflower seeds, raw, hulled (House of Bazzini)​
2,510​
30​
753​
Sunflower seeds, roasted and salted (House of Bazzini)​
4,693​
30​
1,408​
Tartar Sauce, creamy (Kraft)​
247​
15​
37​
Walnuts, roasted​
7,887​
30​
2,366​
AGE kU/100 mL
Serving size (mL)
AGE kU/serving

Fat, liquid
Cream, heavy, ultra-pasteurized (Farmland Dairies, Fairlawn, NJ)​
2,167​
15​
325​
Oil, canola​
9,020​
5​
451​
Oil, corn​
2,400​
5​
120​
Oil, cottonseed (The B Manischewitz Company, Cincinnati, OH)​
8,520​
5​
426​
Oil, diaglycerol, Enova (ADM Kao LLC, Decatur, IL)​
10,420​
5​
521​
Oil, olive​
11,900​
5​
595​
Oil, olive, extra virgin, first cold pressed (Colavita, Linden, NJ)​
10,040​
5​
502​
Oil, peanut (Planters)​
11,440​
5​
572​
Oil, safflower (The Hain Celestial Group, Inc, Melville, NY)​
3,020​
5​
151​
Oil, sesame (Asian Gourmet)​
21,680​
5​
1084​
Oil, sunflower (The Hain Celestial Group, Inc)​
3,940​
5​
197​
Salad dressing, blue cheese (Kraft)​
273​
15​
41​
Salad dressing, caesar (Kraft)​
740​
15​
111​
Salad dressing, French (H. J. Heinz Co, Pittsburgh, PA)​
113​
15​
17​
Salad dressing, French, lite, (Diet Source, Novartis Nutr Corp)​
0​
15​
0​
Salad dressing, Italian (Heinz)​
273​
15​
41​
Salad dressing, Italian, lite (Diet Source, Novartis Nutr Corp)​
0​
15​
0​
Salad dressing, thousand island (Kraft)​
187​
15​
28​

 

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mosaic01

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Messages
508
Finland and Denmark also have the highest dairy consumption, also coffee (According to various statistics, Finland is the #1 coffee-consuming country in the world).
On the contrary , islanders icluding Japan , that consumed fish and pork had always been considered healthy .
Also different types of carbs, reliance on processed vs whole foods
I read Sri Lanka doesn't use coconut oil as it used before and basicaly moved to a western diet. It is not just they started using PUFA oils but processed/refined foods in general.
Cooking technique is also important . Frying in olive oil (or butter) is probably the worst. Look at the charts with AGEs formation in different foods.
Also mold growth during storage, I recently descovered some black mold inside the jar with the residues of coconut oil. Mycotoxins are no joke. Coffee is also prone to accumulating mycotoxins btw.
Finland and Denmark may just have more older people. Same as Japan - high dementia prevalence due to high number of old people.


Environmental factors . I find this abstract interesting:

Finland has the highest death rate from dementia in the world and its environmental features can be instructive in understanding hidden causes of dementia. Environmental factors there include:
1) a climate that is both very cold and humid resulting in housing frequently harboring molds that are capable of producing a neurotoxic mycotoxin
2) the Gulf of Finland as well as Finnish lakes harbor cyanobacteria that produce the neurotoxin, beta-N-methyl amino-L-alanine, known to cause dementia and related disorders
3) the aforementioned toxins can be potentiated by the presence of mercury and methyl mercury which can be found in Finnish waters

4) soil in Finland is naturally low in selenium and selenium deficiency may reduce the quantity and effectiveness of glutathione's ability to protect against neurotoxins. A high rate of fatal dementia could be the consequence of these environmental factors. Studies that can support or disprove this hypothesis are suggested. Such environmental toxins are likely to promote Alzheimer's disease elsewhere in the world where such a combination of neurotoxins may also occur.

Looks like you did not get my point. It's up to her to provide actual arguments against saturated fats, and provide a larger context. I was giving some examples.

Your comment about milk is interesting though. I wasn't aware of that but seems like there's a good association between dairy consumption and cancer, which also backs up the claims about casein by T. Colin Campbell and his China Study.

400kg milk per person per year is insane! Some people in Denmark must live off dairy alone lol.
 
Last edited:
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