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January 2013 Newsletter: "Demystifying dementia...."

charlie

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"Demystifying dementia: protective progesterone"

Birdie has informed me that the new newsletter has arrived. Discussion on it will be held in this thread.
 

Ray-Z

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OK, let's get this party started... :partydance

Two details I found interesting...

(1) The villainous aromatase enzyme (which encourages conversion of testosterone to estrogen) increases in the brains of people with Alzheimer's (p. 2).

(2) A wide range of injuries can kick off the degenerative process and spread inflammation and edema throughout the brain (p. 5):

Ray Peat said:
Even a seemingly minor brain trauma can start a process that leads to permanent and progressive impairment. A brain injury increases the likelihood of later developing Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. A mild concussion, or exposure to ionizing radiation, or even chronic exposure to "weak" electromagnetic fields, can activate these same mechanisms of inflammation and deterioration. These after-effects involve the same mechanisms as the radiation bystander effects -- a spreading of inflammatory processes and edema.

Protect those beautiful brains of yours, Peaty people!
 

John Eels

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Peat discusses often the protective effects of progesterone. Has anyone experimented with peat's progesterone solution? What are some of the experiences with it?
 

charlie

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Birdie

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John Eels said:
Peat discusses often the protective effects of progesterone. Has anyone experimented with peat's progesterone solution? What are some of the experiences with it?

And here is something about progesterone's protective effects in this NL:

Progesterone's antiinflammatory effects include the inhibition of the enzymes that form prostaglandins, overlapping with aspirin in that function. However, unlike aspirin, progesterone also activates and enzyme that degrades prostaglandins.
Besides being important amplifiers of inflammatory reactions, the prostaglandins inhibit mitochondrial energy production and activate aromatase and estrogen synthesis....

And it gets better:
Progesterone also inhibits the synthesis of nitric oxide...

And:
... progesterone's various estrogen-inhibiting actions are a very important part of its protective effects.

But, as Charlie says, go to the other thread where you can find personal experiences. It's more theory/explanation here. :D
 

Birdie

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Ray-Z said:
OK, let's get this party started... :partydance

Two details I found interesting...

(1) The villainous aromatase enzyme (which encourages conversion of testosterone to estrogen) increases in the brains of people with Alzheimer's (p. 2).

(2) A wide range of injuries can kick off the degenerative process and spread inflammation and edema throughout the brain (p. 5):

Ray Peat said:
Even a seemingly minor brain trauma can start a process that leads to permanent and progressive impairment. A brain injury increases the likelihood of later developing Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. A mild concussion, or exposure to ionizing radiation, or even chronic exposure to "weak" electromagnetic fields, can activate these same mechanisms of inflammation and deterioration. These after-effects involve the same mechanisms as the radiation bystander effects -- a spreading of inflammatory processes and edema.

Protect those beautiful brains of yours, Peaty people!
Agree!!
And for those of us maybe with brain inflammation and deterioration or past injuries/insults, Ray always offers solutions or remedies or help. YayYay! :salute
 

Ray-Z

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Birdie said:
And here is something about progesterone's protective effects in this NL:

Progesterone's antiinflammatory effects include the inhibition of the enzymes that form prostaglandins, overlapping with aspirin in that function. However, unlike aspirin, progesterone also activates an enzyme that degrades prostaglandins.
Besides being important amplifiers of inflammatory reactions, the prostaglandins inhibit mitochondrial energy production and activate aromatase and estrogen synthesis....

Aha! Thanks, Birdie. You just answered one of the questions that was nagging me: Why is there so much aromatase in a brain afflicted with Alzheimer's?

You point out that the prostaglandins activate aromatase. On p. 3, immediately after one of the passages you quote, Peat says that "Estrogen activates the formation of prostaglandins (Toda, et al., 2012) and inhibits the enzyme that degrades them (Chang and Tai, 1985)."

So in sad, inflamed brains with lots of PUFA, estrogen encourages formation of prostaglandins, which return the favor by activating aromatase, which encourages conversion of testosterone to more estrogen. Argh! :x

But all is not lost... :cool:

Birdie said:
And for those of us maybe with brain inflammation and deterioration or past injuries/insults, Ray always offers solutions or remedies or help. YayYay! :salute

Yes indeed, and many of the remedies he suggests are old friends of ours...
 

Ray-Z

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On p. 5 of the newsletter, Ray Peat says that anti-serotonin drugs can help improve brain function, and mentions cyproheptadine as an example. I don't think I've seen Ray discuss this drug before...Hmmm...
 

John Eels

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@Charlie
Thanks for pointing me to the progestorne thread. Generally speaking, how do the use cases for progesterone and pregnenolone differ from one another?
 

gretchen

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John Eels said:
Peat discusses often the protective effects of progesterone. Has anyone experimented with peat's progesterone solution? What are some of the experiences with it?

I just read yet again on a menopause forum that progesterone causes cancer. So much for explaining dementia....
 

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John Eels

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Doesn't it say on the container of progesterone cream that it causes cancer? Where does this idea come from?
 

asajulian

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Ray-Z said:
On p. 5 of the newsletter, Ray Peat says that anti-serotonin drugs can help improve brain function, and mentions cyproheptadine as an example. I don't think I've seen Ray discuss this drug before...Hmmm...

Yeah, he recommended this drug to me as well for reducing serotonin. I don't have a doctor to get a prescription though. :(

Some other names for it are Periactin and Peritol.

Just a few studies for cyproheptadine:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9696181

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11485136
 

kettlebell

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John Eels said:
@Charlie
Thanks for pointing me to the progestorne thread. Generally speaking, how do the use cases for progesterone and pregnenolone differ from one another?

Hi John,

I recently used progesterone for a short time to help reduce estrogen (I am a man) after a bad stress event.

As discussed on the Facebook page it seems that progesterone releases the estrogen from tissues into the blood. If your liver isn't functioning properly and getting rid of the blood bound estrogen a lot of it will eventually end up back in the tissues. I found it definitely had a "Cold shower" effect for about a week or so.

As a man I would say go with pregnenolone (With plenty of sugar). Your body converts what it needs to progesterone and DHEA and the pregnenolone normalises hormone levels (Including Adrenaline/Cortisol), reverses edema, repairs damaged brain cells etc. It shares many of the functions of progesterone and doesn't shut down testosterone.

A big thing is to have enough sugar as it rapidly raises metabolism (Especially for me).

"Pregnenolone, taken orally, does nothing noticeable
to a healthy animal or person, but if the stress-related
hormones are elevated, they return to normal when
pregnenolone is taken.
The brain contains much more
pregnenolone, DHEA, and progesterone than do other
organs or the blood, and these levels decrease progressively
with age. Older people are more likely to feel an effect
from pregnenolone, than are young people. A tenth of a
gram is a reasonable first dose, though some people seem to
need as much as I gram per day, possibly because of poor
absorption. (The amount produced daily in a healthy young
adult is roughly 30 mg.)
Normalizing the stress hormones with pregnenolone
often seems to have the effect of correcting the function of
the thyroid gland, probably because it is suppressed by
stress. Since pregnenolone is the precursor for
progesterone and DHEA (and all the other steroid
hormones), it often has the same effects as progesterone or
DHEA, and it has the advantage that it allows the body to
produce just an optimum amount of those hormones.
In
very old people, or people with special enzyme deficiencies,
it might be necessary to supplement all three to achieve their
normal physiological concentration in the tissues.
Pregnenolone and progesterone are known to
protect nerves against the damaging effects of the
"excitotoxins," which activate nerve cells to the point of
cumulative injury during stress and fatigue. The need for
pregnenolone is probably what is described as "agitated
depression," in which the person feels unable to cope with
ordinary life, and when the body is unable to produce
enough pregnenolone, the nervous-physiological distress
leads to increased production of cortisol.
The clinical
depression, which so typically involves elevated cortisol
production, is probably primarily a pregnenolone deficiency." Dr Ray Peat

Bolds are mine.
 

jyb

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asajulian said:
Ray-Z said:
On p. 5 of the newsletter, Ray Peat says that anti-serotonin drugs can help improve brain function, and mentions cyproheptadine as an example. I don't think I've seen Ray discuss this drug before...Hmmm...

Yeah, he recommended this drug to me as well for reducing serotonin. I don't have a doctor to get a prescription though. :(

Some other names for it are Periactin and Peritol.

Just a few studies for cyproheptadine:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9696181

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11485136

What symptoms do you experience due to high serotonin?
 

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