Introducing Potatoes

Discussion in 'Diet' started by BrianF, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. BrianF

    BrianF Member

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    Due to financial constraints I'm going to be reintroducing potatoes to my diet, having dropped all types of starchy foods. I grew up consuming potatoes with every meal and certainly they didn't do me much harm. Pretty sure that vegetable oils my Mother used (due to popular medical advice that they were heart healthy) were the main culprit in any ailments my siblings and I suffered. My main concern is bacterial overgrowth and endotoxic load. I plan on mitigating this by:

    1) cooking the potatoes well and creating a mash with coconut oil mixed in (I would use butter but it gives me eczema type symptoms these days) so that its easier to digest higher up the gut.

    2) Add garlic to the mash for its antibacterial effect.

    3) consuming orange juice afterwards to reduce endotoxins (I read that this will reduce the effect).

    I will of course consume my potatoes with loads of salt (because I like salt) and an organic tomato sauce I have discovered that is entirely pufa free. Hmmmmmmmm.... orgasmic almost.

    Anyone want to offer any advice on how to mitigate the effects of daily consumption of such a starchy food?
     
  2. theLaw

    theLaw Member

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    Just want to point out that if butter is causing you problems, then reintroducing starch might be a very bad idea.

    From Peat:
    Fat-free greek yogurt + OJ or AJ would probably be a better idea.

    If you're dead-set on using potatoes, then you might consider cooked potato juice or the scramble posted on this forum as all of the starch is removed. You can add table-sugar for more calories.

    Cheers!:D
     
  3. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    Induce vomiting following consumption.

    Eat a carrot salad after every meal.
     
  4. squanch

    squanch Member

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    Ignore the starch haters.

    I found the most important thing is cooking the potatoes well (45 min - 60 min) and chewing properly. Your saliva contains starch digesting enzymes, you really want to chew starchy foods until they're completely mushy without any clumps in your mouth, very important.

    Eating the starchy foods in a whole meal together with fats and proteins (not just a big plate of mashed potatoes) seems to work better for me personally too. I usually boil them together with some vegetables or mushrooms, add gelatin to the water and eat it together with cheese and liver / seafood / eggs as a kind of stew.
    It's also a lot less depressing than eating a boiled egg with a glass of orange juice, or just a slice of liver with some sugared milk or whatever other abominations some people here eat.
     
  5. dbh25

    dbh25 Member

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    Similar to squanch, I make potato soup using stock and vegetables, boiling and cooking on low heat for 45 minutes. I only add salt and have with a hard boiled egg.
     
  6. tara

    tara Member

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    +1
    +1

    Probably not a bad idea to have some carrot salad some time after a potato meal (I sometimes get around to this). Personally, I think I prefer the taste of garlic in the carrot salad rather than with the mashed spuds, but either would probably have some effect. Some people find it bothers the gut too much itself, though.

    I like a little butter with my spuds, but too much butter bothers me. But my gut seems to be really happy digesting well-cooked spuds.
    I wouldn't assume butter intolerance = potato intolerance.
     
  7. Peatful

    Peatful Member

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    I have better digestive luck regarding potatoes when I cook them well...refrigerate them overnight...and recook them the next day.
    Something about the resistant starch content? Blah blah blah....
    Sorry, not super scientific or technical...
    But worth exploring.
     
  8. theLaw

    theLaw Member

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    I was just referring to Peat's warnings about starch and sensitive intestines/bad bacteria, but you're correct, many people do fine with them apparently.

    If I were having trouble with any food, I would hesitate to add starch as a solution given all of the drawbacks, and instead focus on liver health.
     
  9. tara

    tara Member

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    If I were having trouble with liver health (which I suspect I am), I would be reluctant cautious about relying on fat or fructose for too large a part of my energy needs.
     
  10. theLaw

    theLaw Member

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    Haven't seen Peat or Haidut recommend starch for those with liver issues, and it never did me any favors with losing weight, but whatever works for you.

    Personal experimentation is always best! Cheers!:D
     
  11. tara

    tara Member

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    +1 :D
     
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