Intro; Acromegaly: Pituitary Adenoma & Goiter

Discussion in 'Diet' started by guapeat, Mar 25, 2020.

  1. guapeat

    guapeat Member

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    Hi there,

    From now on I will try to lurk less, and contribute more:) Also hoping you guys can share some insights considering my health issues. So here's my history. Starting in my twenties I began implementing low carbing, paleo and Weston price like diets. the last 3 years I have been eating and supplementing according to the principles from peat and this forum.

    I am 32 y/old male, 2 meters tall and muscular build, and if it wasn't for my goiter, i'd look pretty fit;) The reason I started eating different early in my twenties is because a goiter slowly develloped over years, and symptoms I allready had for most of my life, like low energy, drive and motivation started to aggravate. Depressive episodes, and especially anxiety only became worse over years, no matter how strict I was in my paleo low carb diet with full of ''healthy'' fish oils, resveratrol etc.

    Slowly over the course of years I noticed how my feet, throat and hands would grow bigger. I also noticed my face getting a rougher look, which I always thought was because of the natural aging process.

    Throughout the years docters basicly kept saying that the goiter was just ''bad luck'', bloodwork is ok so there's noting wrong, they just offered to cut out the thyroid which I always refused. It wasn't until 2 years ago that it came to my mind that growth hormone could have something to do with this.

    Recently I finally found a docter who agreed testing the IGF-1, and found extremely high levels of the growth hormones in my blood. After a glucose test and MRI that showed a pituitary adenoma of 12x12 mm. It finally seems that I have found the cause of my goiter, fatigue and mental issues: Acromegaly.

    After starting to read Peat’s work 3 years ago, I realised based on symptoms that I had high serotonin, histamine, estrogen, and prolactin. Low dopamine, thyroid and mid low androgens.

    The years following up untill now I started trying to correct these disbalances by using off and on: Vitamin A,D,E and K, B complex, ascorbic acid, Ubiquinol, Zinc, Calcium, Magnesium, Tribulus, Creatine, Taurine, Glycine, Gelatine, Aspirine, methylene blue, androsterone, NDT up to 4 grains, Cynomel 1 grain, progest-e, low dose DHEA, Pregnonelone, Cyproheptadin and Metergoline. Phenibut and propranolol on occasions. Also a bunch of herbs and homeopathic stuff.

    I actually don’t notice anything when I take those supplements. The only things I can feel are phenibut, propranolol, cypro, magnesium and creatine (when lifting). Sun, red light and incandescent lamps always give me a relaxed feeling as well.

    My daily diet looks like: scrambled eggs, cheese, butter, sourdough bread, milk, greek yoghurt, honey, OJ, white rice, beef stews, haagen daazs, cacao, lots of fruit, some veggies, gelatin, coffee, daily carrot, coconut milk/oil, weekly oysters and shrimp, some PUFA in the form of weekly pizza.

    To me it seems I tried a lot. But after all those years, goiter, morning depression, low energy, anxiety and body stifness won’t seem to lessen.

    I am hoping that all my issues come from acromegaly, and by curing the disease, my symptoms will go away ass well. The treatment now started with my docter prescribing me cabergoline, which he instructed me to use up until surgury of the pituitary adenoma in a few months.

    My question: Is surgury really necessary? Are there alternative ways in shrinking the pituitary adenoma that I missed? I would be gratefull if you guys could share some of your insight, and ideas on this issue. Thanks!
     
  2. Tristan Loscha

    Tristan Loscha Member

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    Take the cabergoline,say you feel better on it,and stay away from surgery.There are members who had it and took chronically PRL inhibitors and are fine.Depending on World Region,you could have Iodine-deficiency,Maybe you should try 600 to 1000µcg of Potassium Iodide to see whats what,after all,physiological mechanism is increased retainment of iodide in the thyroid-gland in goiter,hence the enlargement to optimize 'capture'.
     
  3. Wilfrid

    Wilfrid Member

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    Try to protect and restore as much as you can your thyroid function.
    Thyroid hormones are potent hormones that regulate the secretions of many other influential hormones such as the pituitary hormone (growth hormone), the adrenal hormones (cortisol, DHEA...) and the sex hormones (especially estrogens, progesterone, testosterone). Correction of a thyroid hormone deficiency inevitably improves the levels of other hormones.
    I think that your goiter is the result of your chronic elevated GH, and this for obvious reasons.
    1- GH stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) primarily in the liver. And IGFs manage many of the classical effects attributed to GH (like you already know).
    2- GH installs insulin resistance.
    3- GH stimulates gluconeogenesis and blocks hepatic uptake of glucose.
    4- GH stimulates lipolysis of adipocytes (by enhancing the liberation of free fatty acids).
    Points 2,3 and 4 are probably the most and the worst offenders of thyroid function.
    As for thyroid support, beware of too much of a high dose of thyroid hormone because in case of GH excess a low cortisol state is almost always present. Cortisol being the chief antagonist of GH. You must be very careful here. In such case, high dose TH will bring down your energy like crazy unless very exceptional, vitamins, minerals and high calories rich diet is also present (considering your height)...and be careful of excess arginine intake. I think that in no way supplements can make up for a deficiency diet and you are probably taking way too much supplements.
     
  4. OP
    guapeat

    guapeat Member

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    That's a high dose of iodine. In the past I did use iodine, even the high dose Llugels, but it seemed to make to goiter worse so I stopped it. I still have a bottle of kelp ( 300 mcg iodine), and i will go back on using this and seeing how it goes. Do you think it might lower GH as well?
     
  5. Tristan Loscha

    Tristan Loscha Member

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    600 to 1000µcg (microgram) of Potassium Iodide is the only one i can recommend,but that would be total daily dose.Im based in Europe,so it is assumed by me to have low levels of intake,but USA has way more seemingly.Also,Selenium,up to 200µcg as Selenomethionine or sodiumselenate.Something is wrong about kelp,but cant remember what.
     
  6. OP
    guapeat

    guapeat Member

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    Thank you Wilfrid. I am on the same page here, assuming that the goiter is a result of the pituitary adenoma secreting lots of GH. But how to protect the thyroid now? it seems inpossible for me to correct insulin resistance with such high GH. So I have to lower GH first to be able to use sugar as fuel and not fat? Somatostain analogues lower GH, would that be a safe option?

    Why should I avoid arginine? The supplements I have listed I am not taking at the moment. Currently using: 70 mg preg, 5 mg DHEA, exemestane 6,25 mg EOD, thyroid, multivitamin and i am starting iodine now. I am eating plenty of carbs, fruit, gelatin, meat, eggs but maybe I could eat more. I am always hungry so that would be easy.
     
  7. Wilfrid

    Wilfrid Member

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    Growth hormone and prolactin have agonist-antagonist function. Dr Peat’s therapeutic approach is more than ever accurate in your situation. Thyroid is really the master piece here.
    Did you have your vitamin D, FSH, TSH, FT3 and FT4 measured?
    TRH stimulates FSH and sensitises cells to the effects of estrogens. And estrogens, TRH (excretion) and TSH (stimulation) stimulates prolactin release. Chronic elevated prolactin has a dramatic burden effect on the adrenals by exercising a continuous relaunching of ACTH via CRH. This is a very tricky loop. The thyroid support here will be very tricky as well. It is not uncommon in your health condition to have a high FT3/FT4 ratio. Sometimes up to the point of a mild form of thyrotoxicosis. And this is why I think you felt well on propranolol. Propranolol, as well as other beta-receptor antagonist drugs, are well known to alleviate the peripheral manifestations of thyrotoxicosis. Cyproheptadin has also prolactin lowering effect and it is also probably the reason why you felt well on it as well. But it can lower cortisol which can be counterproductive in an already low cortisol situation. Arginine is a very potent GH releasing agent and as such avoiding high protein intake in the evening can be helpful.
    For your thyroid, the best advices will come from Dr Peat himself. Do you have a way to contact him? If not, PM me.
     
  8. OP
    guapeat

    guapeat Member

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    Yes, my latest labs show ( before cabergoline, exemestane, preg and dhea):

    vitamine D 97 nnmol/l
    FSH 11 IU/L ref: 1.4 - 18.0
    TSH hovers between 0,2 and 0,7, depending on dosgae cynomel used
    FT3 9,5 pmol/L ref.range: 2,5 - 5,1 pmol/L ( I was using 1 grain NDT and 1 grain cynomel at the time)
    FT4 14,5 pmol/L ref range:12 - 22 pmol/L

    Other hormones tested:
    LH 2 IU/L ref 1.5 - 9.3
    testosterone 8,4 nmol/L (242,27 ng/dL) ref 9 - 30 nmol/L


    Is there an amino acid with an antagonistic function to arginine? One that lowers GH / IGF-1?

    Dr Peat suggested adaquate calcium, Vit.D, and thyroid and progesterone, and he also said things that prevent hypoglycemia are protective. he doesn't get much in detail unfortunatly.

    I have been using all of those without much succes. Soon I will get new labs to see if the caber/exe/preg/dhea mix has been working in lowering IGF-1, and raising test.
     
  9. Wilfrid

    Wilfrid Member

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    I think that your thyroid supplementation pushed you further in a thyrotoxicosis state that you already had for a time. To the same extent high cortisol tends to inhibit T4-T3 conversion, cortisol deficiency often makes some hypothyroid people quickly into an « artificial » state of hyperthyroidism without being « truly » hyperthyroid, because in this condition T4 converts excessively into T3. Taking both temperature and pulse, like Dr Peat recommends, will easily confirm this pattern.
    It’s a fact that in some people, thyroid treatment can stimulate the adrenal glands to produce more cortisol. But remember that cortisol is the chief antagonist to GH. In almost every case, a low cortisol state will leave GH unopposed.
    In this situation, you will squeeze your adrenals like crazy. Hence again, the reason you felt so well on propranolol. Your FSH is clearly too high, vitamin D and myo-inositol are both potent regulators of FSH secretion. And both will help with hormones regulation. Dr Peat is right about calcium and, in certain situations, the use of a plant that contains silica (like horsetail) as well as vitamin K (ideally from foods) can be helpful. If you decide to stay on thyroid hormones, please re-start slow (less than 1/4 grains) and split the dose with your meals. At least thrice a day and fine tune your dosage according to your well-being, temperature, pulse and blood pressure.
    I will dare to say that a combination of a very low dose melatonin (something like no more than 50 mcg) and 1 mg of cypro can help regulate your GH secretion in the long term.
    Keeping an eye on PTH and alkaline phosphatase are very important too.
    Below is a link on how to improve a low cortisol level (you will see that, like you already experienced, light is important), I can’t vouch for the dietary advices but it might help anyway:
    Cortisone Deficiency By Dr Thierry Hertoghe | TPAUK
    Dr Peat used to recommend me this website as a useful source for hypothyroid people.
     
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