Interesting Blog On Red /infrared Light

Discussion in 'Red Light, Infrared, LLLT' started by Wagner83, May 6, 2017.

  1. Wagner83

    Wagner83 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2016
    Messages:
    3,174
    Gender:
    Male
    Here you go:

    LED Light Therapy

    He also talks about halogen lights and how similar to sunlight it is, and has ideas for cheap set ups (concerning red/infrared light too).
     
  2. OP
    Wagner83

    Wagner83 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2016
    Messages:
    3,174
    Gender:
    Male
    Excerpts:
     
  3. TripleOG

    TripleOG Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2017
    Messages:
    240
    Gender:
    Male
    Yea, great page. Something "new" jumps out with every re-read.

    Interesting comments on skin blocking 90-95% of the penetrating light. Falls in line with those successful autoimmune thyroiditis studies dosing 707J/cm2 with 830nm lasers. The treated tissue probably received 1/10th of that. Around 6J/cm2 is often recommended here. Seeing how drastically skin, melanin, and depth drastically affects penetration, I'm not sure 6J/cm2 is sufficient without taking the aforementioned into account. I'll definitely be closing/covering my eyes when treating my face from now on, seeing how the retina loads up MUCH faster.

    Another very interesting comment in his "pulsing" section:

    Blasting irradiance north of 100mW/cm2 may not be worth it. Wish he was still active on his site to touch on current research.

    I plan on testing out his halogen-water setup. Starting with one 500W flood light. I'm intrigued enough between the testimonial under "Light Therapy Bed" and this post on Peatarian years later raving about it: Halogen light through two inches of water is the way to do light therapy - Ray Peat Q&A . Want to see if there's a noticeable difference from the 12W 660nm grow light I own.

    Using his math, a 500W halogen concentrating 80% of its light over a 30x30 cm area (square foot) will deliver 120-125mW/cm2 in the 600-900 range. About half of this is near the four specific beneficial wavelengths. Water blocks the far-IR. I'm curious if there's added benefits with the blue and green wavelengths. While they don't penetrate the skin, they may aid in acne/pimples and irregular pigmentation. The testimonial on heelspurs mentioned disappearing moles the person had since birth while the Peatarian poster said his psoriasis and keratosis pilaris disappeared. We'll see.
     
  4. Baltazar

    Baltazar Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2018
    Messages:
    107
    Gender:
    Male
    @TripleOG

    For godsake

    Stop making me weird

    Which one is the best ? Hahaha
     
  5. TripleOG

    TripleOG Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2017
    Messages:
    240
    Gender:
    Male
    Which what is best? Wavelength? Light source? Other?
     
  6. Baltazar

    Baltazar Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2018
    Messages:
    107
    Gender:
    Male
    @TripleOG

    Is the sun better source for all benefits ?
     
  7. ddjd

    ddjd Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2014
    Messages:
    3,135
    awesome blog. does this photo mean copper is essential in order for red light to successfully improve cytochrome c oxidase function [​IMG]
     
  8. TripleOG

    TripleOG Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2017
    Messages:
    240
    Gender:
    Male
    I'm no expert. I'm just piecing together information from different sources like everyone else here.

    The sun is a one-stop-shop for light benefits. The sun isn't our only light source throughout the day, though. Isolating the 600-900nm wavelengths helps offset the the excitation of shorter wavelengths found in electronics and indoor lighting, as well as the stress of inadequate light and darkness.

    LEDs are likely best when focusing on the 600-900nm range. The wavelengths are powerful, specific, easier to calculate dosing, low-to-no heat allowing longer treatments at close distances (which may be necessary according to data on the heelspurs website).

    Incandescent are good if you want heat along with red light benefits (think winter). Has low amounts of shorter wavelengths to avoid circadian rhythm dysregulation. Downside is you won't get the intensity of LEDs due to too much heat at close distances. This just means you'll need longer exposures times compared to an LED source.

    Halogens can be looked at as supplemental sunlight without the UV. An option if you value shorter wavelengths. (e.g, seasonal affective disorder, possibly acne, etc.)
     
  9. Baltazar

    Baltazar Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2018
    Messages:
    107
    Gender:
    Male
    Thanks man
    I really appreciate it :D
     
Loading...