Instead Of Lowering Blood Pressure, Why Not Increase Heart Rate Instead?

Discussion in 'Heart, Heart Rate, Blood Pressure' started by yerrag, May 11, 2019.

  1. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    As those familiar with my thread on dealing with hypertension are aware, I've had high blood pressure for close to 15 years, and I have been having difficulty getting it to go back down to normal. It has gone as high as 240/140 anout 2 years ago, and has now gone down to the 180/120 level.

    All throughout I haven't taken any blood pressure lowering drugs, and I haven't experienced headaches. I'm making this experiment on my own body, and people inside and outside this forum have expressed their concern about the high bp levels. The concern is that it will destroy my kidneys, or that it will burst my blood vessels.

    While my kidneys have lower filtration rates that puts me in stage 1 CKD (chronic kidney disease) category, as indicated by a high urine ACR (albumin/creatinine ratio), I don't buy the idea that it is caused by high blood pressure as much as the idea that the kidney dysfunction is causing the high blood pressure. I also don't believe that the high blood pressure will cause blood vessels to burst (aka aneurysm) as long as my blood vessels are healthy enough, and I believe I haven't reached the point where my blood vessels will quit on me and burst. Why I believe so - my inflammation markers are fine with very low values in hsCRP, ESR, and slightly high levels in LDH.

    I believe now that my high blood pressure is the body's adaptation to clogged capillaries, but not arterioles or major arteries. Since capillaries are much much smaller in cross-sectional area, the effect of plaque would have more impact in the capillaries than in the larger vessels. This means that the tissues and organs fed by capillaries would be the first to experience sub-optimal function (or dysfunction).

    Since diagnostic tools (such as ultrasound, MRI and CT Scan) are limited in determining the presence of plaque in capillaries, a determination of clogged capillaries isn't possible to diagonose short of cutting into the tissue and organ, which is too invasive and harmfully impractical. In my case, the kidneys is the first organ to show symptoms of plaque in my small capillaries. While I would view my high blood pressure as a kidney problem (somehow confirmed by my high urine ACR levels), I believe in reality I'm merely scratching the surface here.

    My hair isn't as lush as before, and although I still have a full head of hair, it is evident in my photos that the camera captures my scalp underneath the hair. This indicates the capillaries are not delivering as much nutrients to the scalp, and could very well be a plaque problem. As far as penile endurance goes, I believe this is also the case.

    I also have high cholesterol and high triglycerides, and my liver SGPT and SGOT are barely over optimal levels. This would indicate some dysfunction in my liver, even as my thyroid is fine and my blood sugar control is optimal.

    @ecstatichamster mentioned in a recent thread that my high blood pressure could very well be the reason nutrients are still able to reach my tissues. I somehow knew this but wasn't able to articulate this and I agree with him on this. Just imagine if you had a water pump that supplies your shower in the 2nd floor of your house. If you replace the 3/4" water pipe that runs from the water pump to your shower with a 1/4" water pipe, it would be certain that the shower would turn into a trickle. The solution would be to replace the current water pump with a much stronger pump so that the pump would be able to increase its pressure to overcome the reduced water flow with the thinner pipe. Seeing how useful increased water pressure is to continue to have a nice shower experience, it makes sense that increased blood pressure is needed to course blood through an increasingly plaque-filled capillary system.

    For me, there are two steps to lowering my blood pressure. The first step is to correctly identify the cause of my high blood pressure condition. The second is to have a sound way to eliminate the cause of this condition.

    I believe I have identified the cause to be arterial plaque blocking my capillaries. And while I don't get to see the plaque to be absolutely certain, I would bet everything I have on it. It's because plaque can be formed by chronic bacterial infection and the body's defense reaction to it. I've only recently discovered that I've been harboring a periodontal bacterial colony for at least 15 years, and I believed that over the years, the battle between the bacteria (and its endotoxins) and the body's defense system has resulted in plaque lining up my blood vessels, with the most impact on the small blood vessels - the capillaries. It's only past half a year since I've had my periodontal condition discovered and dealt with. Now, I'm dealing with the damage it has done- the plaque accumulated in my blood vessels.

    I now have a protocol to deal with it. It involves taking proteolytic enzymes (ZymEssence) to lyse away the plaque, and intake of magnesium (magnesium acetate) and b6, to dissolve calcification, and vitamin k2 for its decalcifying effects. I also would like to add some form of cyclodextrine supplement (to remove cholesteryl esters that form part of the plaque, but have no idea how to go about it. I'm also thinking of low-dose minocycline as the link @CLASH has shared has been very helpful (I think lowering inflammation would be very helpful. I've seen my left knee arthritis and my scalp seborrheic dermatitis take a hiatus after I started on low-dose doxycycline).

    In all these, I believe that for all these supplements to work as effectively as possible, it is important that they are distributed all throughout the body. Instead of aiming to lower blood pressure (although that is the eventual goal) I would have to increase the blood pressure to allow these nutrients to be pushed towards the smaller capillaries.

    To do so, I would have to increase my metabolism, and in increasing my metabolism, my heart rate would also increase. So I would have to take metabolic boosters with the aim of getting my heart rate to go to 85 bpm. I'm considering take thyroid and drinking coffee, and taking niacinamide.

    I know this approach this very counter-intuitive but this isn't the first a counter-intuitive approach has been proposed. In the case of diabetes, sugar has been proposed and used as therapy for it. So, it's along the same spirit that I have this plan in mind.

    There is a risk to this approach given that my current metabolism and heart rate is low. This could be the reason why my cholesterol and triglyceride is high (hence the high liver SGPT/SGOT). Until now, I have held on to the belief that my low metabolism is the body's way of protecting my body. And thus, the low metabolism is to keep my blood pressure from getting too high. This may very well be true, but I also think my body needs a little jolt, a jumpstart, if you will, in order to heal itself. Otherwise, without this jolt, the capillary plaque will never be acted upon, and they will never be dissolved, and the capillaries will just stay plugged up.

    Now, I need the high pressure boost from higher metabolism to jumpstart the process of healing. The sustained high blood pressure will allow nutrients and enzymes to reach the difficult to reach capillaries, and start the process of removing the plaque.

    Thank you for reading this far. Any comments for or against is appreciated.

    Note: I consider myself to be on the 99 percentile health-wise, despite my very high blood pressure. My body temperature is normal, I have a very strong immune system as evidenced by lacking any allergies. I have not had the flu nor any fever for close to twenty years, and I have good endurance levels. When I started on Peat 2-3 years ago, I had frequent bouts of allergic rhinitis which would last me usually 2 weeks. I had seborrheic dermatitis and left knee arthritis for close to 20 years, but these were resolved only recently thanks to low-dose doxycycline. My blood sugar is excellent. Wake up fasting blood sugar is 85. In between meals blood sugar at 75. And on a one-day fast, blood sugar stays constant at 65.
     
  2. CLASH

    CLASH Member

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    @yerrag
    -serrapeptase and nattokinase are reported to dissolve plaques.

    -Vit C and collagen peptides to rebuild the damaged arease once plaques are removed might be a helpful addition.

    -BCAA’s can help with kidney function.

    -cholesterol can be high to protect from endotoxin, as well as be high from low thyroid.

    -vit e to help with pufa and peroxidation of fatty acids can be helpful. From what i understand a balance of gamma and alpha tocopherol is needed

    -saturated fats can help deal with endotoxin issues in the gut and saturate cholesterol. Coconut oil, beef tallow and cocoa butter Are good sources.
     
  3. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Thanks Clash. There is some serrapeptase in the enzyme blend of ZymEssence, with papain and bromelain as well. I also ordered a bottle of Serrapeptase and will try that if ZymEssence isn't helping me.

    Yes, vitamin C and collagen will definitely help. As far as collagen and BCAA's go, I'll probably end up increasing intake of food rich in these, increasing my protein intake in the process. As for vitamin E, my intake is from coconut milk, which contains some vitamin E I mix coconut milk with cowe's milk.

    I've been trying to minimize supplements by taking in foods that are rich in nutrients so that I can make my supplement intake manageable.

    As a recap:
    For supplements, for now I'll be on -

    -proteolytic enzymes to lyse plaque
    -magnesium and b6 and vitamin k2 to decalcify
    ,-vitamin C to rebuild the extracellular matrix (with gelatin from food)
    -niacinamide and thyroid to increase metabolism, heart rate, and blood pressure to ensure blood effectively supplies the smallest capillaries with nutrients
    -low dose minocycline to reduce inflammation arising from bacteria and endotoxins
    -cyclodextrin supplements to remove cholesteryl esters from plaque (no specific plan yet though)

    At the same time, I have to make sure my protein intake in increased with emphasis on increasing BCAAs and gelatin intake. To take coffee as well to increase metabolism. Increase intake of coconut oil and beef tallow.

    Lastly, ensure I get adequate minerals and vitamins from food to ensure there's no deficiency.
     
  4. Dolomite

    Dolomite Member

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    I would use bromelain to help get rid of fibrosis. It seems to have helped us with some joint pain and me with GERD symptoms. It might help remove some arterial plaque, too. Also, I think removing high beta carotene foods has helped my circulation in some manner because my lips are pink and not blue now. I don’t have high blood pressure but my father did and he said it was high even as a young man.
     
  5. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I could be wrong but I'm more disposed to thinking my kidney condition is more about plaque-filled capillaries, more specifically glomerulosclerosis. It hasn't progressed to the point where the kidney tubules and microvasculature are being impinged upon by fibrosis. Especially at this point where I'm barely on stage 1 chronic kidney disease, where the albumin excreted is still miniscule, reflective of microalbuminuria than albuminuria.

    But it's good to know that bromelain can help with plaque. I'm glad it helped ease your joint pain. Do you know how it helped? The joint pain on my left knee went away when I used low-dosing of doxycycline. It must confirm that the cause is mycotoxins. I had earlier supplemnted with magnesium and potassium, in the belief that without enough potassium there won't be enough energy to drive out the mycotoxin. That didn't work, but maybe it set the stage for low-dose doxycycline to be more effective.
     
  6. TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Name of product: Rheum officinalis
    Form used in research: Crude herb or tea
    Amount used by practitioners: Generally as part of a Chinese tea.
    Actions:
    • Increases glomerular filtration, and decreases cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Rheum may relieve
    diabetic nephropathy by improving lipid metabolism. (1)
    • Aqueous extract (tea) has shown lowered blood glucose levels. This may be another reason it has been
    useful in diabetic nephropathy.(1)
    • Aqueous extract increases urinary excretion of urea nitrogen and creatinine, probably due to increased
    glomerular filtration. (1)
    • Improved uremic indices in a clinical trial where it proved much more effective in preventing chronic
    renal failure (CRF) progression than an ACE inhibitor and together they worked synergistically to
    prevent CRF. (18)
    • Has been found in a clinical trial to lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels in patients with chronic
    kidney failure. This may help in preventing the development of glomerulosclerosis. (18)

    Source: https://www.rjwhelan.co.nz/conditions/pdf files/Kidney Health.pdf
     
  7. TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    "RO (Rheum Officinale) also reduced proteinuria and the severity of glomerulosclerosis in a nephrectomy CKD rat model (Zhang and el Nahas, 1996)."

    Source: Chinese Herbal Medicine Improves the Long-Term Survival Rate of Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease in Taiwan: A Nationwide Retrospective Population-Based Cohort Study
    The effect of rhubarb extract on experimental renal fibrosis. - PubMed - NCBI
     
  8. TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Dr. Prendergast claims to successfully treat atherosclerosis and kidney disease using l-arginine + vitamin D in his patients. That coincides with this study on glomerulosclerosis:
    Long-term dietary L-arginine supplementation attenuates proteinuria and focal glomerulosclerosis in experimental chronic renal transplant failure. - PubMed - NCBI

    Dr. Prendergast can be found talking about this treatment and related information on youtube.
     
  9. Dolomite

    Dolomite Member

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    I started taking bromelain after reading the Travis corner where Travis was discussing prostaglandins and bromelain. Also, its anti fungal properties are interesting to me. I looked into serrepeptase but didn’t like the idea of dealing with the side effects others have when using it. I haven’t noticed anything negative with bromelain.

    I am not entirely sure about how too much vitamin a or beta carotene fits in but the way I understand Grant Generaux’s theory in my oversimplified interpretation is that vitamin a promotes cell turnover but that it can become too much and the cells build up and that can happen in small ducts and in the circulatory system leading to blockage. It might be worth a try to see if reducing beta carotene would help your kidneys.
     
  10. David PS

    David PS Member

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    yerrag - you have made some amazing progress. Hibiscus tea may be something else to consider. It is known to lower blood pressure. Here is a deep link into the relevant section of Ray Peat's email exchange where he mentions hibiscus tea.
    Ray Peat Email Exchanges - Ray Peat Forum Wiki

    There are lots of reports of people getting good results from 2-3 cups of tea per day. I do not drink tea but I add hibiscus to the water when I am making white rice. Here is product that I use. https://www.amazon.com/Frontier-Org...erByKeyword=blood+pressure#reviews-filter-bar

    Best of luck.
     
  11. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Thanks a lot for sharing these TreasureVibe! I hope I can find these herbs when I take a trip to Chinatown. First, I'll have to translate it to Chinese and then show it to the Chinese drugstore clerk. It's hit or miss though. They often sell as a blend of herbs, and it may be that they aren't used to selling them as individual herbs.

    Thanks David! I've had hibiscus tea before. I think it's part of the Red Zinger tea that I like to drink. Didn't know it's useful for lowering bp. I read the Amazon reviews and it's amazing how much bp got lowered drinking the tea. I wonder though what it does as the reviewers would say that when they stop drinkig it, the blood pressure would rise again.
     
  12. BRMarshall

    BRMarshall Member

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    A course of Calcium EDTA might be something to look into. I believe that oral administration is now seen as something that has good benefits and is a less expensive option.
    I think research along these lines would consider taking for say month, and then off, then on, etc. Some sort of staggering might be suggested?

    Apparently the EDTA will help through its ability to be a chelator, but also as regards helping with blood flow viscosity issues. Blood viscosity is a whole issue in itself.
     
  13. David PS

    David PS Member

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    EDTA is a good suggestion. Heavy metals may be the root cause of the hypertension and EDTA would help reduce heavy metal burden. Otherwise, herbs like Hibiscus might need to be used indefinitely.

    Another herb to consider is celery seed extract. It has some good reviews for blood pressure. Amazon.com: Customer reviews: Natural Factors - Celery Seed Extract, Circulatory Support, 120 Vegetarian Capsules
     
  14. jamies33

    jamies33 Member

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    How long and at what dose do you think serrapeptase should be taken to see considerable plaque removal?
     
  15. CLASH

    CLASH Member

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    @jamies33

    I havent used serrapeptase yet which is why I worded the post with “reported to”. I just got a bottle the other day and I plan to experiment with it soon. I usually dont like to say anything about dosage or use until I try it myself but I can give you some links. Something to keep in mind with serrapeptase, based on what I have read, is that it can cause bleeding issues, especially if combined with lumbrokinase, nattokinase, aspirin, other blood thinners and maybe bromelain. It also breaks down biofilms, and in doing so can make bacteria more pathogenic, as once they enter biofilms they become more dormant. It also can break down abscesses so it can release trapped infection and possibly make the infections worse. Overall it definetly has risks so I wouldnt want to leave those off the table when considering using it.

    Here are some links:
    Dr. H A Nieper on Serrapeptase

    Serrapeptase: Proven Health Benefits, Dosage, and more

    13 Serrapeptase Benefits + Dosage, Reviews, Side Effects - SelfHacked

    I would also check out reviews of different serrapeptase products on amazon and try to find german and japanese articles on the compound because thats where it is mainly used and researched. A lot of the english based articles are scarce and seem to want to paint an ambiguous and negative light on it. If bromelain, serrapeptase, nattokinase and lumbrokinase can dissolve plaques, and keep the blood thin, that would be a terrible problem for the pharma companies involved in the production of blood thinners like xarelto, brillanta, warfarin, lovenox, plavix etc. So I think it is very understudied here.
     
  16. jamies33

    jamies33 Member

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    Perfect, thanks
     
  17. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    This is an interesting and helpful article. It confirms what I suspected to be the cause of my hypertension, in that "the antigen-antibody are deposited in the glomeruli. Glomeruli become blocked by inflammation.

    Noteworthy too :"Postinfectious glomerulonephritis was usually caused by streptococcus; currently, glomerulonephritis is increasingly caused by staphylococcal and gram-negative bacteria." @CLASH this jives with what you were saying about my hypertension probably having to do with these from my previous frequent episodes of sore throats and more importantly my latent periodontal issues which lay undetected for years.

    What I didn't agree with the article is that it advocated eating soy protein for people with kidney disease, and for the use of flax seed to deal with kidney issues.

    But this isn't to take away the good points in the article. On rheum officinale, it mentions that it is part of a tea blend, so that confirms my fear that I won't be able to find it in the Chinese drug stores of Chinatown, if I were to look for it specifically. The drug store would probably recommend a tea blend for the kidneys without letting me know if it contains this herb. Hmm...

    Oh before I forget, it's mentioned that rheum officinale contains emodin, and this makes me smile. If I can't get this herb, I can still console myself with using cascara sagrada or make my own aloe extract from aloe vera.
     
  18. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I went through a series of chelation before with EDTA and it successfully rid me of mercury, which came from 11 mercury amalgam-filled cavities. From being calcium-deficient leading to cavities to being intoxicated with mercury, I can appreciate how one deficiency could snowball into a larger chronic issue when methods use lead to more problems, as is the case here with dentists, and in the general case, with doctors.

    Glad that the EDTA option is available for oral intake. It might be a gentler method as well.
     
  19. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I'm not sure I want to go this route for now. I think that the renal transplant situation would not be similar to a kidney that's filled with plaque. The plaque itself would inhibit the expression of NO as a vasodilator for blood vessels. I would prefer to work on removing the plaque, and hope that in due time, with plaque removed, the NO would be expressed well enough to relax the blood vessels.

    I only found one Youtube video of Dr. Prendergast on l-arginine. It's a short video and it doesn't explain enough on it, I don't know how he would be able to remove his plaque simply by using l-arginine.
     
  20. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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