Influence Of The Culture Substrate On The Agaricus Blazei Murrill Mushrooms Vitamins Content

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by Experienced, Sep 22, 2019.

  1. Experienced

    Experienced Member

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    Influence of the Culture Substrate on the Agaricus blazei Murrill Mushrooms Vitamins Content (09-2019) : MedicinalMycology


    The vitamin content of cultivated mushrooms differs from one species to another, depending on their stage of development, the nutrient substrate used to produce them, and the microclimate in the culture space.

    Agaricus blazei Murrill is one of the most popular cultivated medicinal mushrooms, with scientifically proven therapeutic properties. Considering that the Agaricus spp. mushrooms culture substrate can be produced using various raw materials, in this paper we have studied the influence of the culture substrate using four types of substrate with different protein additions on the vitamin content of mushrooms.

    The food qualities of the Agaricus blazei Murrill mushrooms, evaluated by the chemical composition, generally revealed the product obtained on the classic compost, improved with the addition of proteinaceous of corn flour.

    Mushrooms harvested on this substrate have the highest levels of B1 (1151 μg 100 g−1 dm), B9 (671 μg 100 g−1 dm), B12 (906 μg 100 g−1dm), PP (55.33 μg 100 g−1 dm), and C vitamins (21.67 μg 100 g−1 dm).

    The content of ergosterol, as a precursor of D2vitamin, has higher values in the product obtained on the classic compost, with the addition of wheat bran (90.17 mg 100 g−1dm) and the addition of corn flour (94 mg 100 g−1 dm).

    The full paper can be found here

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    This paper indirectly also underlines -again !- how silly it is to assume that all mushrooms are created alike.

    My point being that dosage recommendations for supplements based on specific medicinal mushrooms need to be based on the levels of active ingredients in the mushrooms, because these can and will vary enormously depending on strain, environment, cultivation method and processing.

    This paper shows that, again. Yet almost no supplement sellers will invest in a lab test measuring those levels. Instead they usually write, just an example: "100% Lion's Mane extract", which might or might not contain something useful. Or, "chock full of vitamins"... but no specs to back that up.

    Paul Stamets / Host Defense in a recent newsletter points out how important and preferable freeze drying is if you want to be sure all vitamins are kept intact. But, he does not list those vitamins on his labels, and this paper also shows that the vitamins are not a reason to spend money on a mushroom supplement - the vitamin levels are very low.
     
  2. Dave Clark

    Dave Clark Member

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    This producer seems to get a lot of respect in the medicinal mushroom business. It looks like they do quite a bit of verification and testing on their mushrooms, and they don't grow in a grain-based substrate.
     

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  3. OP
    Experienced

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    Very nice PDF!
     
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