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Increased Pufa Oxidation May Be Biomarker For Alzheimers

Discussion in 'Alzheimer's' started by haidut, Jan 14, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    In line with the slow public admission that Alzheimer is a metabolic disease, this study found that the development of Alzheimer's can be predicted by a simple analysis of urine. The predictive biomarker in urine is called octenol (1-Octen-3-ol) and is it is formed in humans through the breakdown of linoleic acid (the main PUFA). So, to sum it up - increased levels of biomarkers of PUFA oxidation found in urine can be highly predictive of development of Alzheimer's disease.
    And as a final win for Peat's work, the same octenol has also been found to be causative in Parkinson disease. And if that wasn't enough, octenol is a approved by the FDA as food additive! :eek: :shock:
    Can somebody please check if it is approved for use in organic foods? That would be soul-crushing if true.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 100738.htm
    http://www.nature.com/articles/srep19495

    "...While within each APP strain multiple compounds were found to significantly deviate in concentration from that of NTg mice, only one compound (1-octen-3-ol) was significantly altered in concentration across all three strains."

    "...In conclusion, our findings in mouse models of AD suggest that volatile odor signatures are also likely to be observed in human AD populations and may be informative early indicators of AD during prodromal disease states. An arguably ideal test of this could be performed in human ApoE4 (apolipoprotein E type 4 allele) positive populations compared to ApoE4 negative. This would have to be carefully performed while controlling for fluctuations in dietary intake, hormone levels, other medical disorders, and/or medical treatment which could each impact urinary odor composition. We predict that future work incorporating volatile urinary odor quantification concurrent with other more standardized biomarkers, including CSF Aβ, brain volume measures, PiB imaging, and cognitive testing will be essential in translating the efficacy of this finding into a sensitive clinical diagnostic."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1-Octen-3-ol
    "...Octenol is produced by several plants and fungi, including edible mushrooms and Lemon balm. Octenol is formed during oxidative breakdown of linoleic acid."

    "...Octenol is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a food additive.[7] It is of moderate toxicity with an LD 50 of 340 mg/kg.[6] In an animal study, octenol has been found to disrupt dopamine homeostasis and may be an environmental agent involved in parkinsonism."

    http://tobaccoproducts.org/index.php/Octenol
    "... Industry claims used in: processed vegetables, baked goods, frozen dairy desserts, condiments, soft candy, gelatin, puddings, and soups."
     
  2. Tarmander

    Tarmander Member

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    Found this: https://anthonycrasto.wordpress.com/201 ... m-alcohol/

    Interesting that it may attract mosquitos...I wonder if that is part of the process of why some people get bitten more, and why b1 can be helpful in repelling mosquitos. Did not find much on whether it is allowed in organic farming.
     
  3. thebigpeatowski

    thebigpeatowski Member

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    Wow...thanks for posting haidut. I was looking around for studies regarding the effects of oxidized omega-3 PUFA, which the entire planet deems necessary. I came across this:

    http://www.jlr.org/content/53/10/2069.short

    I'm no scientist, but this could explain one cause for the spate of GI distress so prevalent now.
     
  4. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Hhhm, I guess attracting mosquitos may be another sign of PUFA oxidation? Not sure if it can be used as a health test since mosquitos may like other compounds in human sweat as well. But it's good to keep in mind.
     
  5. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Thanks for the study. The next time somebody tells you omega-3 is anti-inflammatory, show them this from your study:
    "...Oxidized diets enhanced plasma inflammatory markers and activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) in the small intestine along with decreasing Paneth cell number (up to −19% in the duodenum). "
     
  6. thebigpeatowski

    thebigpeatowski Member

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    This IS interesting...according to haidut's OP this compound is also found in lemon balm, an herb that I have grown. I always thought lemon balm REPELLED mosquitos, there must be some other compounds in lemon balm that override??? The more I learn, the less I know. :?
     
  7. Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    I know this is an old post, but this quote made me too angry not to comment.

    Does anyone need any further proof that the food industry is purposefully trying to make us sick to further their profits?
     
  8. akgrrrl

    akgrrrl Member

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    Cirion, your thorough documentation on emf simple household exposures were read by many and appreciated. This last comment is anger shared by many. How helpful it would be, if forum members could submit to you, studies like this to form a Do Not Eat list, with the reasons why? You are a good organizer and technically savvy. What say ye?
     
  9. Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    Wow, you sure know how to flatter a guy haha. I appreciate all the kind words!

    That sounds like a very interesting thing to do. Although, I'm not actually sure just how useful it would be in the long run, as it seems peoples' tolerance for foods seems pretty individualistic and dependent upon digestion power. I now kind of believe that even "junk foods" can be tolerated if metabolism and digestion is rock solid (explaining why some people are healthy even when eating poor foods). But perhaps a list could be made scoring food choices in terms of ease/difficulty of digestion and people can make their own choices based upon it. It does seem like in general some things are best avoided with compromised metabolism, a few might be starch, PUFA, processed foods, too much liquids for example.
     
  10. akgrrrl

    akgrrrl Member

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    Well, not to hijack this post, but somewhat related, as there are foods we THINK might just be ok, whether they are choices for each individual or not. I am thinking in terms of a list that says "these foods are made with the following toxicant X". I am trying to think now, whats the white pigment in paint that readies it for dyes, that is fda approved in hundreds of foods.. its in toothpaste, salad dressings, marshmellows, most antything that gets coloring ...so like Haiduts post telling us about octenol, a list of mainstream items we might reconsider if we knew what they contained.
     
  11. Ptolemy

    Ptolemy Member

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    Does this mean white mushrooms are bad? :(

    Volatile constituents of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus). Changes which occur during heating

    Looks like it's also in certain cheeses:

    Octenol - Molecule of the Month - December 2009 - HTML-only version

    "Apart from mushrooms (and truffles), it crops up in many other foodstuffs, notably giving the odour of Camembert cheese (photo, right) a mushroom note. It has also been found in blue cheeses, and in some fruit sources, such as raspberries and orange juice oil, in elder flowers and in Australian prawns and sand-lobsters."
     
  12. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    It is simply a biomarker of increased PUFA oxidation, but the study does not say that the chemical itself is bad for health. You do bring up a good point, which is that the scientists need to control for intake of mushrooms or cheese when testing its levels in blood.
    The Wikipedia page says it can be dangerous for dopaminergic brain cells but the doses used in those studies were high and probably not achievable from diet. However, if somebody has a lot of PUFA in their stores and not enough vitamin E then their levels of octenol may reach dangerous levels. One more reason to use vitamin E and probably one reason why vitamin E has shown neuroprotection in Parkinson disease.
     
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