Important Information For Your Doctor. PUFA Depleted Rats Are More Sensitive To Volatile Anesthesia

Discussion in 'Ray Peat Topics' started by methylenewhite, Mar 23, 2020.

  1. methylenewhite

    methylenewhite Member

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    Manipulation of Rat Brain Fatty Acid Composition Alters Volatile Anesthetic Potency
    A S Evers et al. J Clin Invest. Mar 1986
    Abstract


    The molecular mechanism of volatile anesthetic action remains unknown. Attempts to elucidate this mechanism have been complicated by the absence of models in which changes in neuronal cellular properties can be correlated with changes in whole animal anesthetic effect. In this study we describe a model where diet-induced alterations in rat brain fatty acid composition are correlated with alterations in volatile anesthetic potency. Rats maintained on a fat-free diet showed significant depletion of arachidonic acid (20:4 omega 6; 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 omega 3; 4,7,10,13,16,19,-docosahexaenoic acid) in brain, and a corresponding increase in Mead acid (20: 3 omega 9; 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid). These fat-deprived rats were significantly more sensitive to all volatile anesthetics tested than were age-controlled rats on a normal diet. Parenteral supplementation of the fat-deprived animals with linolenic acid (18: 3 omega 3, 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid) completely reconstituted the docosahexaenoic acid content of brain without affecting anesthetic sensitivity. In contrast, supplementation of the fat-deprived rats with linoleic acid (18: omega 6; 9,12-octadecadienoic acid) caused a dramatic decrease in anesthetic sensitivity, but only a small change in whole brain arachidonate content. Further analysis revealed that linoleate supplementation of fat-deprived animals resulted in a preferential normalization of the arachidonate content of brain phosphatidylinositol as compared with other brain phosphoglycerides. These results demonstrate for the first time a correlation between changes in membrane composition and anesthetic effect, and indicate that the precise fatty acid composition (perhaps in specific phospholipids) of brain is important in the mechanism of volatile anesthetic action.

    Manipulation of Rat Brain Fatty Acid Composition Alters Volatile Anesthetic Potency - PubMed

    ABSOLUTELY MUST TO MAKE YOUR ANESTHESIOLOGIST AWARE OF IT IN CASE YOU ARE GOING TO HAVE A SURGERY AND YOU ARE PUFA DEPLETED.
     
  2. Mhtro

    Mhtro Member

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    Does this also affect the potency of GABA drugs such as benzos, meaning their sedative effect?
     
  3. SOMO

    SOMO Member

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    Thanks for posting this info Methylenewhite, it's actually useful and something of which I was unaware.

    But if you tried to tell your anesthesiologist this before surgery, I doubt they would listen.
    The doctor would think: "I didn't learn about this in medical school, it doesn't matter if you brought some study. I went to medical school and memorized the best textbooks, who do you think you are telling me how to do my job?"


    Doctors are authoritarian and when you question them (or question the Standard of Care) they often shut down and stop listening or, worse, spew vitriol.
     
  4. OP
    methylenewhite

    methylenewhite Member

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    I believe an anesthesiologist would listen because there is a chance for him get a patient killed. If there is a medical information in your wallet saying volatile anesthesia hypersensitive they would be careful dosing it for sure. Probably better not to tell the PUFA thing, just higher anesthesia sensitivity.
     
  5. JanP

    JanP Member

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    This x1000. The way you communicate with your doctor makes all the difference. If you are smart about it, they often listen.
     
  6. maillol

    maillol Member

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    I find most doctors are pretty open to discussion when you bring studies. I always say I've been researching at my university library rather than "the internet".
     
  7. JanP

    JanP Member

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    Exactly. Not acting like they are dumb / you are smarter and not mentioning the word "internet" would be two most important things when communicating with your doctor.
     
  8. Vinny

    Vinny Member

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    :handok:
     
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