I Made Potato Juice "scramble" And It Was Good

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by spicegirl, Jun 27, 2017.

  1. spicegirl

    spicegirl Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Gender:
    Female
    Hi there,

    I made potato juice "scramble". I was surprised at how much thick, gooey white starch stayed at the bottom of the juice.

    Here's my recipe...
    1. Juice some white potatoes and let sit for about 3 - 5 minutes.
    2. Heat some ghee in a pan (I used a non-stick pan)
    3. Pour liquid into the hot pan (don't include starch)
    4. Stir until thickened (maybe 10 to 15 minutes...it takes a while)
    I liked it! I have pretty simple tastes though.

    I'd like to make a batch of it - either a batch of juice in advance or juice then cook a bunch all at once to have leftovers.

    Has anyone else tried this? Did you like it?

    SG
     
  2. Mossy

    Mossy Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2017
    Messages:
    958
    Gender:
    Male
    Hello there,

    Last week I tried to scramble my first time made potato juice and I had no success. My process was very similar to your 4-step process. Maybe I didn't heat and stir long enough, but I found that the liquid never solidified like scrambled eggs. How solid of a result did you get -- how close to scrambled eggs?
     
  3. OP
    spicegirl

    spicegirl Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Gender:
    Female
    Mine got fairly solid. It took waaay longer to cook than eggs. Did you let the juice sit for a bit? Mine Sat for maybe five minutes. I used a non-stick pan, which I think helped. Not sure what else I can say to help.
     
  4. Mossy

    Mossy Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2017
    Messages:
    958
    Gender:
    Male
    Yes, I did let the juice sit for about 15 minutes. I'll give it another try.
     
  5. OP
    spicegirl

    spicegirl Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Gender:
    Female
    I used white potatoes (not Russet or anything). Mine sat for about 5 mins.Ge

    Good luck!
     
  6. James b

    James b Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2018
    Messages:
    717
    Gender:
    Male
    Would anyone be kind enough to help me out. Obviously this is a very time intensive process, and I want to try to incorporate this infrequently as my digestion is gradually getting better. I was looking for a ready made solution and found this. Would this suffice? Pros/cons? If anyone could chime in absolutely anything that would be fantastic, thanks guys.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Biotta-Org...8&qid=1540056262&sr=8-1&keywords=potato+juice
     
  7. Mossy

    Mossy Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2017
    Messages:
    958
    Gender:
    Male
    That’s pretty interesting, that they manufacture potato juice. I’m just a common Joe researcher/self-treater, so hopefully more scientific minds will chime in—but, I do have a couple thoughts.

    First, with digestive issues, the most glaring thing would be the “rich in potato starch” aspect. One of the benefits of making your own is removing as much starch as you possibly can. Maybe they do the very same thing and the reality is you can only remove so much. But, if they don’t, that would be a big thing with regard to digestion — at least for me.

    Also, being pasturized may be a factor, such as a reduction in nutrients/bioavailability; many on this forum will state this is the case with milk and orange juice.

    Lastly, being fermented, my guess would be that that could be a factor for sensitive stomachs/digestion; but, they do claim it is “mild” and used for “ gastrointestinal symptoms ” uses.

    Ultimately, I see homemade as superior, but maybe just like prepared/manufactured milk and orange juice, it could be better than nothing. I’ll be curious to see what others say.
     
  8. aquaman

    aquaman Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2013
    Messages:
    1,297
    To peel and juice 10 pounds of potatoes takes 20 mins, max. That will last you a week easily. You can boil it for 10 minutes, and keep it in the fridge, and re-heat when you need.

    Hardly time-intensive.

    [edit: ps, mine never scrambles, it's just like a watery soup. I often mix it with bone broth to make a soup too]
     
Loading...