I ate mussels three days in a raw and I got hypothyroid!

Discussion in 'Meat, Organ Meat, Gelatin, Seafood' started by milk_lover, Aug 30, 2015.

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  1. milk_lover

    milk_lover Member

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    I don't feel well after this mussels experiment. I feel cold and my hair quality got worse. Could the mussels make me hypo?

    Few more question while at it... What kind of seafood do you eat and how often? If someone has seafood allergy or histamine issues, can eating the peat way still work without seafood?
     
  2. Nicholas

    Nicholas Member

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    clams, mussels, and oysters are very imbalanced foods. very high iron and other vitamins like b-12 in very large amounts.....or very high zinc witht the oysters that's not balanced with enough copper. If i eat any of these shellfish too much i don't feel as well. Though i eat seafood every day (shrimp, scallops, cod) i eat clams, mussels, and oysters less frequently.
    not saying that this is the reason you feel hypo, but it's my experience with these foods. think of food more in the context of imbalances rather than a specific effect or detriment to an isolated system in the body (like thyroid).

    i would imagine you could get away with not eating seafood if your digestion is really good. wouldn't end the experiment here.
     
  3. jaa

    jaa Member

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    That sounds strange to me, but I guess it could happen. Mussels are very high in iron and could be high in histamine. They are also very high in other vitamins and minerals so maybe something is throwing you out of whack.

    Personally I eat about 1lb of mussels per week, 40g of scallops per week, and 4-12 oysters per week. I find if I remove one of these items for a few weeks I don't feel as energetic as when I eat them. I also have low iron, so the high iron content of mussels and oysters is not an issue for me and probably makes me feel better. And I take 2mg of cypro twice a week to help with any histamine issues from the seafood and cheese I eat.
     
  4. OP
    milk_lover

    milk_lover Member

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    Nicholas and jaa, yeah I think the experiment may have created an imbalance. Regarding the iron content, I usually eat steak with almost the same amount of iron I got from mussels and I have no problem. I drank espresso after each time I ate mussels. There might be something else beside iron. I ate the mussel dish from a korean restaurant called Mad for Garlic. I made sure to tell them to prepare it without oil and wine. But it was made in a tomato based soup if that adds anything to the topic. I am not sure if they removed the oil though. I always have problems communicating with Koreans in English. Korean waiters usually say they cook with olive oil but I found out they might be confusing soy bean oil with olive oil!

    Mussels, beside being rich in iron, B12, and selenium, are also rich in phosphorus. Could the mussel experiment throw off the calcium/phosphorus ratio? Is ingesting +2000% DV of b12 causing imbalances of other vitamins or minerals?
     
  5. Nicholas

    Nicholas Member

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    yes, of course it can throw off the calcium/phos. ratio. but you apparently balance the phosphorous of steak, right?
    what's the purpose of the mussels experiment?
     
  6. sugar daddy

    sugar daddy Member

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    I would think that it's because you ate at that restaurant three days in a row.

    You just can't trust restaurants to not use some bad ingredients :(
     
  7. OP
    milk_lover

    milk_lover Member

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    Nicholas, I drink 2 to 3 quarts of 1% milk daily. I thought that might be enough to balance the ratio. The same days I did the mussels experiment I was eating also steak because they have it at the menu and I was like what the hell lol! That might have increased iron and phos. But I checked in cronometer, 3 quarts of milk is enough to have almost 1:1 ratio.. So the Ca/P ratio might not be the issue after all..

    I did the mussels experiment because I read if you increase your metabolism, you're going to lose the trace minerals and you need to replete them.. Also, I want to see what mussels do to my body since they are easy to find in korean restaurants.
     
  8. OP
    milk_lover

    milk_lover Member

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    sugar daddy, yeah so true about restaurants.. :cry:
     
  9. tara

    tara Member

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    I think shellfish quickly develop higher levels of histamine when they are not very fresh. For people who are sensitive to histamine, or tend to high levels of it, that could be an issue.
    You could have a personal intolerance.
    I consider the a Peat-inspired diet to be one that does not unnecessarily provoke irritation and stress. If a particular food does this, I think it is consistent with Peat's ideas to avoid it (at least for a while - these things can change). I don't think there is any single food you have to eat - you are doing the right thing observing your own reactions to foods. Peat has said to eat for a high metabolism, not to follow a rigid one-size-fits all-protocol.
    You need to get some selenium and zinc from somewhere, but not necessarily form shellfish.
    If I were you, I'd skip them for a while, and try again in a while - eg after a month.


    That oysters are high in zinc seems to me to be a good part of the point in eating them, since it seems many people don't quite get enough. Interesting to read your reaction to them, though.
     
  10. Nicholas

    Nicholas Member

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    oh yeah - oysters are definitely a good option for people wanting something with higher zinc. but some people may decide they don't need as much zinc and may focus on beef (which is more balanced with copper).
    i think with shellfish (in my experience) they work best as supplements alongside other proteins. i think fish stew makes good sense for this reason because you get a stew of all kinds of minerals and amino acids. like i personally don't need a lot of B12, so i have to be very low-dose about clams - mixing 3 or 4 with some scallops or something. or pairing mussels with shrimp. hot cocoa goes well with oysters.
     
  11. OP
    milk_lover

    milk_lover Member

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    tara, I was talking to my Korean colleagues and they told me Koreans usually do not eat shellfish in the summer because the hot humid weather makes their shells vulnerable so they get spoiled easily. They mentioned if they were to eat it, they would cook them in the summer. In the winter, they eat them raw.. I wonder if this has any basis scientifically or in the peat world :roll:
     
  12. tara

    tara Member

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    Peat said he cooked is shellfish since having a colleague or friend get very ill from eating some that were contaminated. I cook mine too. Seems feasible that summer would be riskier than winter for contamination.
     
  13. OP
    milk_lover

    milk_lover Member

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    Thanks, tara :D
     
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