Hypothyroid And Exercise Recovery

Discussion in 'Thyroid and Hormones' started by MSH, Oct 17, 2020 at 5:20 PM.

  1. MSH

    MSH Member

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    Why is it that when one is hypothyroid and they over do it exercising ( that is if it’s a good day and they even feel like exercising) that it takes so long to recover?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Velve921

    Velve921 Member

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    This can be a long conversation. But simply put, when the body operates on cortisol and adrenaline consistently, the adaptation can keep the cycle on this loop. Therefore, tissue will continue to be utilized to help the body recover which can be an expensive and time consuming process, hence the longer recovery.
     
  3. OP
    MSH

    MSH Member

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    Thanks for your reply. So, if one is hypo then they are running primarily on adrenaline and cortisol?
     
  4. Hans

    Hans Member

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    I think someone can build a lot of (useless) muscle when hypothyroid. Big, bulky and slow muscle vs lean, hard, fast and stringy muscle.
    A hypothyroid person might produce a lot more lactate and have reduced endurance and recovery, but that lactate then stimulates angiogenesis and useless (even harmful) growth.
    Recovery and growth are highly energy intensive, so although it's possible to build muscle in a hypothyroid state, recovery just takes much longer and their volume will be reduced due to their ineffective energy production.
     
  5. Velve921

    Velve921 Member

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    I think there are many different variables involved. But in my experience I would say cortisol and adrenaline are dominant culprits; especially with athletes. Which, this depiction could make it easier to understand. I’ve coached athletes that expended 10000-12000 calories on a game day over a 24 hour period. Most athletes don’t take it in that much so they’ll have to find other places to make energy. Muscle and fat are pretty logical if they starve themselves during intense activity with a high heart rate.
     
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