Hypothyroid 4 yr old?

Discussion in 'Ask For Help or Advice' started by kofimama, Aug 3, 2013.

  1. kofimama

    kofimama Member

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    Reading like mad, but in need of help with my 4 yr old's health issues and possible hypothyroidism. Now that I'm learning to read labs properly (I think), I just found a TSH value from when my son was pretty sick, just prior to having a feeding tube placed. His TSH was 2.88, which looks startlingly high, but not sure if children's values should be different from an adult's values. FYI, besides having a feeding tube for a year (1.5-2.5 yrs. continuous weight loss and inability to thrive for months), he suffers from multiple, severe food allergies, environmental allergies, digestive issues, head to toe eczema and anemia. Also, besides wondering about his TSH value, what is a healthy pulse rate for a 4 yr. old? I've always felt positive about his future health, but even more so now as things start to make a little more sense...Any input is greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Jenn

    Jenn Member

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    I know a woman who's grand daughter "ate" potato protein through her feeding tube. She was born with her stomach not connected to her intestines. She THRIVED on it.
     
  3. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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  4. OP
    kofimama

    kofimama Member

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    I so wish I had known the possibilities when he had his feeding tube. We could have done some major healing! He's been tube free and eating whole foods for almost 2 years now...
     
  5. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    I eat it to heal, making a batch tomorrow.
     
  6. OP
    kofimama

    kofimama Member

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    Will check out the protein potato soup. We do eat LOTS of potatoes around here, roasted with tallow/coconut oil, mashed with gelatin, etc...
     
  7. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Sounds like you are on the right track. :)

    I do think limiting starch as much as possible is the optimal way to go.
     
  8. OP
    kofimama

    kofimama Member

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    Might it be probable that a TSH value of 2.88 be the source of his problems? Or does that not mean anything without looking at other hormones/metabolic function?
     
  9. j.

    j. Guest

    Peat says that TSH should be around 0.4 or less, but I don't know if he refers to little kids. One of the best things you could do, if you're not doing it already, is avoiding giving him significant sources of polyunsaturated fats.
     
  10. Bluebell

    Bluebell Member

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    Charlie, I read that thread, but was wondering still ... when you cook it, how many minutes do you cook it for?

    Do you put butter or coconut oil in the pan first, or just put it direct into a clean pan?

    Do you peel the potatoes first before juicing?

    Thanks so much! (made liver your way today & it was great)
     
  11. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Ray Peat said cook it like scrambled eggs, so I figure, what, 2 or 3 minutes for scramble eggs? Then, I throw in a couple extra minutes hoping it helps to further deactivate the starch that is left in there. No matter how hard I try, there is always a smidgen of starch.

    I throw the butter and coconut oil in, then throw the potato juice in. Yes, I peel the potatoes first.

    Glad you liked the liver. I really enjoy it too! :)
     
  12. Bluebell

    Bluebell Member

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    Thanks a lot, I'm going to try that sometime ... sounds pretty straightforward I think :)
     
  13. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    OH, and don't let the coconut oil get too hot and then throw in the juice. Otherwise you might be in for a nice little fire show when the coconut oil tries to exit the scene. :lol:
     
  14. Bluebell

    Bluebell Member

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    Hee hee flambe potato juice!
     
  15. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Back to kofimama's original question. According to Ray Peat all the symptoms you mentioned, intolerance to foods, allergies, etc, are all symptoms of hypothyroid.
     
  16. OP
    kofimama

    kofimama Member

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    Thanks, j. Yes, in the process of cutting down PUFA significantly and hope to see major progress there. I was taught (as a nutritional therapist) to use soaked nuts (not for my son because of allergies) and seeds as a good source of fat and protein so long as they were soaked properly. And that FCLO was one of the best things I could give my son. I've learned so much in this last month my head feels like it might explode. I know better now! Thank you.
     
  17. j.

    j. Guest

    Main sources of PUFA are vegetable oils. Beef and lamb are low in PUFA, while chicken, fish, and pork fat are high in PUFA.

    Nuts also contain PUFA. I don't think you get rid of them with soaking, and if one were to eat them, limiting them to something like once a week might be good.

    Butter is a good fat. Margarine is high in PUFA.

    It usually takes at least a few months, some people even take two years, to see positive changes from PUFA avoidance. This is because it takes a while for the stored fat to change. Losing weight quickly makes things worse.

    The main sources of good foods are dairy, fruits, meats (especially organs), shellfish, and eggs. Soy and raw vegetables should be avoided, except carrot, which is good raw.
     
  18. OP
    kofimama

    kofimama Member

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    Unfortunately, for now anyway, my son has severe allergic reactions to eggs and moderate allergic reactions to dairy. We rarely eat raw veggies, except for carrots, cucumber and snap peas raw and we eat no vegetable oils except for the PUFAs in sunflower seeds/butter. The other high source of PUFA we've been getting is from chicken and pork fat and it's such a bummer to give up the lard! But we can do it.

    I have to start making ghee again to see if he can tolerate it...Hope so!

    We eat primarily fruits, meats, potatoes, and other veggies, coconut oil, tallow, and non-GMO corn, though I know we should get rid of that as well. Also, some white rice and buckwheat here and there. Breakfast for a kid who can't tolerate eggs and dairy sort of sucks.

    I know it could take awhile for our bodies to really reap the benefits of a low PUFA diet, so we will plug along.

    Thankfully, eating this way and not restricting sugar is pretty darned easy for a kid to go along with! We also do a lot of sour gummy "worms" and add gelatin whenever possible.

    Thanks again, j.!
     
  19. j.

    j. Guest

    Regarding eggs, have you tried giving him only the yolk?

    Regarding dairy, trying cheese is a possibility, though make sure he drinks enough liquid as to not cause constipation. Another possibility is greek yogurt (dehydrated yogurt). You could buy a yogurt without flavor and use a coffee filter to dehydrate it. Some people who react badly to milk can consume yogurt.

    I often leave 1 or 2 quarts of plain yogurt in a coffee filter at night, and consume it all dehydrated in the morning. I add sugar and things to it. The problem with flavored yogurt is that it often doesn't dehydrate well with the coffee filter.
     
  20. j.

    j. Guest

    I'm guessing that the whole healing process could be speed up with a Ray Peat, Broda Barnes like endocrinologist. No clue how to find them though. Broda Barnes' book about hypothyroidism is great and accessible.
     
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