haidut

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The study discovered a new protein requiring vitamin K as a co-factor. It has long been known that vitamin K regulates both the synthesis and carboxylation of osteocalcin, with the latter subsequently regulating functions as diverse as blood clotting, bone mineralization, soft-tissue decalcification, metabolic rate of fat cells, testosterone/progesterone synthesis in male/female gonads, insulin secretion, etc. It is that last function - regulating insulin secretion - that has been of great interest lately in regards to both vitamin K and osteocalcin. There are multiple observational studies demonstrating strong inverse link between vitamin K levels/consumption and diabetes. There are also a few intervention trials (both human and animal ones) demonstrating vitamin K administration can ameliorate insulin resistance and/or diabetes. However, up until now, the mechanism of vitamin K effects has been incomplete as its effects on osteocalcin are not sufficient to explain its anti-diabetic potential. The study below found a previously unknown protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that may provide additional explanation for vitamin K effects. That protein, called eGRP, is responsible for controlling bi-directional calcium flux between the cytosol and ER in the beta-cells of the pancreas (where insulin is produced). Too much calcium entry into the ER means too much insulin secretion and that would be the classic hyperinsulinemia seen in diabetes type II. The study discovered that sufficient vitamin K levels enable the proper functioning of EGRP, thus trapping excess calcium and protecting the beta-cells. If chronic calcium overload occurs (due to lack of vitamin K), the overload and resulting hyperinsulinemia eventually lead to toxicity and beta-cell death, and thus to diabetes type I. As such, vitamin K may protect from both types of diabetes.

https://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(23)00511-9
New research reveals how vitamin K helps protect against diabetes

"...Vitamin K is a micronutrient known for its role in blood clotting, in particular in gamma-carboxylation, an enzymatic reaction essential to the process. It has been suspected for several years that this vitamin, and thus gamma-carboxylation, may have other functions as well. Several studies suggest a link between a reduced intake of vitamin K and an increased risk of diabetes. However, the biological mechanisms by which vitamin K protects against diabetes remained a mystery until now. In their study, UdeM associate research professor of medicine Mathieu Ferron and his team at the IRCM were first able to determine that the enzymes involved in gamma-carboxylation and therefore in the use of vitamin K were present in large quantities in pancreatic beta cells, the very cells that produce the precious insulin that controls blood sugar levels. "Diabetes is known to be caused by a reduction in the number of beta cells or by their inability to produce enough insulin, hence our keen interest in this novel finding," said Ferron, a leading researcher in molecular biology. "In order to elucidate the cellular mechanism by which vitamin K maintains beta cell function, it was essential to determine which protein was targeted by gamma-carboxylation in these cells." "We were able to identify a new gamma-carboxylated protein called ERGP," added Julie Lacombe, who conducted the work in Ferron's laboratory. "Our study shows that this protein plays an important role in maintaining physiological levels of calcium in beta cells in order to prevent a disturbance of insulin secretion. Finally, we show that vitamin K through gamma-carboxylation is essential for ERGP to perform its role." This is the first time in 15 years that a novel vitamin K-dependent protein has been identified, opening a new field of research in this area."
 

Ismail

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The study discovered a new protein requiring vitamin K as a co-factor. It has long been known that vitamin K regulates both the synthesis and carboxylation of osteocalcin, with the latter subsequently regulating functions as diverse as blood clotting, bone mineralization, soft-tissue decalcification, metabolic rate of fat cells, testosterone/progesterone synthesis in male/female gonads, insulin secretion, etc. It is that last function - regulating insulin secretion - that has been of great interest lately in regards to both vitamin K and osteocalcin. There are multiple observational studies demonstrating strong inverse link between vitamin K levels/consumption and diabetes. There are also a few intervention trials (both human and animal ones) demonstrating vitamin K administration can ameliorate insulin resistance and/or diabetes. However, up until now, the mechanism of vitamin K effects has been incomplete as its effects on osteocalcin are not sufficient to explain its anti-diabetic potential. The study below found a previously unknown protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that may provide additional explanation for vitamin K effects. That protein, called eGRP, is responsible for controlling bi-directional calcium flux between the cytosol and ER in the beta-cells of the pancreas (where insulin is produced). Too much calcium entry into the ER means too much insulin secretion and that would be the classic hyperinsulinemia seen in diabetes type II. The study discovered that sufficient vitamin K levels enable the proper functioning of EGRP, thus trapping excess calcium and protecting the beta-cells. If chronic calcium overload occurs (due to lack of vitamin K), the overload and resulting hyperinsulinemia eventually lead to toxicity and beta-cell death, and thus to diabetes type I. As such, vitamin K may protect from both types of diabetes.

https://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(23)00511-9
New research reveals how vitamin K helps protect against diabetes

"...Vitamin K is a micronutrient known for its role in blood clotting, in particular in gamma-carboxylation, an enzymatic reaction essential to the process. It has been suspected for several years that this vitamin, and thus gamma-carboxylation, may have other functions as well. Several studies suggest a link between a reduced intake of vitamin K and an increased risk of diabetes. However, the biological mechanisms by which vitamin K protects against diabetes remained a mystery until now. In their study, UdeM associate research professor of medicine Mathieu Ferron and his team at the IRCM were first able to determine that the enzymes involved in gamma-carboxylation and therefore in the use of vitamin K were present in large quantities in pancreatic beta cells, the very cells that produce the precious insulin that controls blood sugar levels. "Diabetes is known to be caused by a reduction in the number of beta cells or by their inability to produce enough insulin, hence our keen interest in this novel finding," said Ferron, a leading researcher in molecular biology. "In order to elucidate the cellular mechanism by which vitamin K maintains beta cell function, it was essential to determine which protein was targeted by gamma-carboxylation in these cells." "We were able to identify a new gamma-carboxylated protein called ERGP," added Julie Lacombe, who conducted the work in Ferron's laboratory. "Our study shows that this protein plays an important role in maintaining physiological levels of calcium in beta cells in order to prevent a disturbance of insulin secretion. Finally, we show that vitamin K through gamma-carboxylation is essential for ERGP to perform its role." This is the first time in 15 years that a novel vitamin K-dependent protein has been identified, opening a new field of research in this area."
I couldn’t see what type of vitamin K they used in the study - is this mentioned anywhere?
 

Regina

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The study discovered a new protein requiring vitamin K as a co-factor. It has long been known that vitamin K regulates both the synthesis and carboxylation of osteocalcin, with the latter subsequently regulating functions as diverse as blood clotting, bone mineralization, soft-tissue decalcification, metabolic rate of fat cells, testosterone/progesterone synthesis in male/female gonads, insulin secretion, etc. It is that last function - regulating insulin secretion - that has been of great interest lately in regards to both vitamin K and osteocalcin. There are multiple observational studies demonstrating strong inverse link between vitamin K levels/consumption and diabetes. There are also a few intervention trials (both human and animal ones) demonstrating vitamin K administration can ameliorate insulin resistance and/or diabetes. However, up until now, the mechanism of vitamin K effects has been incomplete as its effects on osteocalcin are not sufficient to explain its anti-diabetic potential. The study below found a previously unknown protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that may provide additional explanation for vitamin K effects. That protein, called eGRP, is responsible for controlling bi-directional calcium flux between the cytosol and ER in the beta-cells of the pancreas (where insulin is produced). Too much calcium entry into the ER means too much insulin secretion and that would be the classic hyperinsulinemia seen in diabetes type II. The study discovered that sufficient vitamin K levels enable the proper functioning of EGRP, thus trapping excess calcium and protecting the beta-cells. If chronic calcium overload occurs (due to lack of vitamin K), the overload and resulting hyperinsulinemia eventually lead to toxicity and beta-cell death, and thus to diabetes type I. As such, vitamin K may protect from both types of diabetes.

https://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(23)00511-9
New research reveals how vitamin K helps protect against diabetes

"...Vitamin K is a micronutrient known for its role in blood clotting, in particular in gamma-carboxylation, an enzymatic reaction essential to the process. It has been suspected for several years that this vitamin, and thus gamma-carboxylation, may have other functions as well. Several studies suggest a link between a reduced intake of vitamin K and an increased risk of diabetes. However, the biological mechanisms by which vitamin K protects against diabetes remained a mystery until now. In their study, UdeM associate research professor of medicine Mathieu Ferron and his team at the IRCM were first able to determine that the enzymes involved in gamma-carboxylation and therefore in the use of vitamin K were present in large quantities in pancreatic beta cells, the very cells that produce the precious insulin that controls blood sugar levels. "Diabetes is known to be caused by a reduction in the number of beta cells or by their inability to produce enough insulin, hence our keen interest in this novel finding," said Ferron, a leading researcher in molecular biology. "In order to elucidate the cellular mechanism by which vitamin K maintains beta cell function, it was essential to determine which protein was targeted by gamma-carboxylation in these cells." "We were able to identify a new gamma-carboxylated protein called ERGP," added Julie Lacombe, who conducted the work in Ferron's laboratory. "Our study shows that this protein plays an important role in maintaining physiological levels of calcium in beta cells in order to prevent a disturbance of insulin secretion. Finally, we show that vitamin K through gamma-carboxylation is essential for ERGP to perform its role." This is the first time in 15 years that a novel vitamin K-dependent protein has been identified, opening a new field of research in this area."
Vit K, the wonder drug!!
 

youngsinatra

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I recently got myself a liquid K1 supplement in olive oil/tocopherol base and I have noticed some distinct beneficial effects after taking it.

I mainly take it to prevent potential bleeding issues from aspirin usage. I did not tolerate K2 well in the past, so I try K1 at the moment.
 

Drareg

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Below study is interesting, I know we have been over this in the past on here.
It claims mk4 at RDI levels decreases osteocalcin, it goes against most peoples experience of using it.

Vitamin K acts as a cofactor and is required for post-translational γ-carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDP). The current recommended daily intake (RDI) of vitamin K in most countries has been established based on normal coagulation requirements. Vitamin K1 and menaquinone (MK)-4 has been shown to decrease osteocalcin (OC) γ-carboxylation at RDI levels. Among the several vitamin K homologs, only MK-7 (vitamin K2) can promote γ-carboxylation of extrahepatic VKDPs, OC, and the matrix Gla protein at a nutritional dose around RDI. MK-7 has higher efficacy due to its higher bioavailability and longer half-life than other vitamin K homologs. As vitamin K1, MK-4, and MK-7 have distinct bioactivities, their RDIs should be established based on their relative activities. MK-7 increases bone mineral density and promotes bone quality and strength. Collagen production, and thus, bone quality may be affected by MK-7 or MK-4 converted from MK-7. In this review, we comprehensively discuss the various properties of MK-7.
 

exile

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I recently got myself a liquid K1 supplement in olive oil/tocopherol base and I have noticed some distinct beneficial effects after taking it.

I mainly take it to prevent potential bleeding issues from aspirin usage. I did not tolerate K2 well in the past, so I try K1 at the moment.
Product name? I usually eat a decent amount of well steamed kale and broccoli everyday and take a little k2, but honestly feel like a few of my issues could be related to not getting enough k.
 

youngsinatra

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Product name? I usually eat a decent amount of well steamed kale and broccoli everyday and take a little k2, but honestly feel like a few of my issues could be related to not getting enough k.
Gal vitamin K1.
 

yerrag

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Ray Peat recommends well-cooked greens, mainly for calcium and magnesium.

He had recommended vitamin K1 over K2 for supplementation.

I just wasn't sure if he ever said that the greens already contain plenty of vitamin K1.

Since I have long ago began the process of shifting to food to get vitamins and minerals (since leaving the US and coming back to the Philippines, which makes that shift all the more achievable), i have since joining the forum began taking mainly well-cooked greens for lunch and dinner. It has been 6 years since.

It's nice to know that vitamin K helps with better blood sugar regulation (and many other metrics of our health as haidut mentioned) but we didn't have to have a study confirm this to us. Just strive to be free of deficiencies as well as toxic foods. And eat real food instead of relying on supplementation. So you don't have to sweat the details. The simple and less educated folks didn't have to know of new groundbreaking studies in order to live a lifestyle that Dr. Weston Price discovered contribute to an overall health that is superior to what modern science, real and propagandized, can ever offer.

I believe it is because I went to eating liver once a week for vitamin A (a controvrsial topic) that has made my vision improve to such a point that I have long ditched my bifocals (since I had become both farsighted and nearsighted as I got older). Now I drive without glasses, and read books with ease.

I don't want to sound like gbolduev, but he is on point when he discourages people from relying too much on hormones as if they are regular mainstays of staying healthy. Their use should be limited to helping kickstart a poor metabolism so that the body can be able to wean itself away from them when the body has got itselff together to produce these hormones. But I'm afraid many people has developed the contrary idea, which makes them not much different from people who take pharma's maintenance drugs.

I believe Ray Peat's message at the start has been more about getting the body to maintain and/or heal/regulate itself from a balance internally, but he had not been stressing this message in later years, as he has given in to encouraging people to take a lot of supplementation that boosts metabolism. As a result, this forum has become filled with members who narrowly target health improvements from a few metabolic boosters, and neglect other areas that indirectly would support metabolic health.

I believe his newsletters, more than his interviews (which cater more to an audience that cannot pick up the nuance by connecting the dots that studiously going over his newsletters) allow one to rise above the narrow but popular consensus that hormonal supplementation is the viable way to go to improve health.

If one gives oneself a reasonable timeframe to improve, instead of acting like an obese person on a deadline looking at a weighing scale every hour on the hour, one would be able to act like the turtle that handily beat the rabbit in a race.
 

peter88

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"Cooked greens, milk, cheese, and eggs are very good sources of K. The solvents used to extract vitamin K, for example from natto, often cause problems. The present vitamin K culture is the creation of marketing campaigns, and is causing a lot of harm." - Ray Peat

I’m thinking of adding in parsley for its very high k content. I’ve tried to make all types of vitamin k supplements work for their supposed benefits but they all cause me issues.
 
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"Cooked greens, milk, cheese, and eggs are very good sources of K. The solvents used to extract vitamin K, for example from natto, often cause problems. The present vitamin K culture is the creation of marketing campaigns, and is causing a lot of harm." - Ray Peat

I’m thinking of adding in parsley for its very high k content. I’ve tried to make all types of vitamin k supplements work for their supposed benefits but they all cause me issues.
Here is your parsley!

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Dapose

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I recently got myself a liquid K1 supplement in olive oil/tocopherol base and I have noticed some distinct beneficial effects after taking it.

I mainly take it to prevent potential bleeding issues from aspirin usage. I did not tolerate K2 well in the past, so I try K1 at the moment.

Very interesting. Can you describe the intolerant symptoms you experienced from K2.
Thanks
 
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@Rinse & rePeat
Hi!
Do you ever make Saag Paneer the Indian dish? Mmm! I’d love a recipe for that! Cheese and cooked greens!
😋
I have not made that one Dapose. I love it too though. I wonder if I could find a “Peaty” way to make it, since the spinach is so high in iron. I will bookmark your message and look into it for us. I love Korma too!
 

sunny

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Does anyone know the harms Dr. Peat was speaking of? I use aspirin, and therefore k, which has been k2 on the skin. I do drink alot of milk. I wonder if I am getting sufficient k from it.

"Cooked greens, milk, cheese, and eggs are very good sources of K. The solvents used to extract vitamin K, for example from natto, often cause problems. The present vitamin K culture is the creation of marketing campaigns, and is causing a lot of harm." - Ray Peat
 
EMF Mitigation - Flush Niacin - Big 5 Minerals

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