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How does the raw carrot help?

J

j.

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Ray Peat recommends having a daily carrot for intestinal health. What's the mechanism by which it helps? If it just kills bacteria, both good and bad, I can't see how it would be positive. Or does it kill just bad bacteria?
 

charlie

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Those are great questions.
 
J

j.

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By the way, not sure if this should go on the "Dietary" forum.
 

charlie

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I think its appropriate here unless someone else disagrees.
 

cliff

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The fiber can't really be broken down to feed bacteria so it passes through you like a sort of sweep and helps to eliminate estrogen by bulking up your poop and keeping you regular. It has an antibiotic effect because it starves the bacteria of food.
 

Gregory Taper

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@cliff, I have been asked this before and am not quite sure of the answer but what would you say when someone says I thought Ray Peat was against eating fiber/pulp. so how come it is okay to eat the fiber from the carrot?
 

cliff

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GT said:
@cliff, I have been asked this before and am not quite sure of the answer but what would you say when someone says I thought Ray Peat was against eating fiber/pulp. so how come it is okay to eat the fiber from the carrot?

He's only against fibers that easily feed bacteria. Fibers like carrot/bamboo shoot because of the environment they grow in are resistant to bacterial break down.
 

narouz

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cliff said:
The fiber can't really be broken down to feed bacteria so it passes through you like a sort of sweep and helps to eliminate estrogen by bulking up your poop and keeping you regular. It has an antibiotic effect because it starves the bacteria of food.

I've read this from Peat too.
Someone else on another thread wanted to know how the coconut oil worked with the carrot.
What I remember Peat writing was that the
carrot, coconut oil, and salt
each had their own antibiotic properties.
So kinduv a synergistic effect I guess.
 

narouz

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j. said:
Ray Peat recommends having a daily carrot for intestinal health. What's the mechanism by which it helps? If it just kills bacteria, both good and bad, I can't see how it would be positive. Or does it kill just bad bacteria?

Here's the interesting thing:
Peat reportedly thinks that a sterile intestinal tract may be best.
So...he doesn't think much of the whole ProBiotic thing.
This is a weird and fascinating little part of PeatWorld.
Danny Roddy's site is where I saw this info.
I think it is credible.
 

WilltoBelieve

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Peat's research shows that cellulose is the type of fiber that increases transit time and reduces estrogen without known negative effects. He has also written that it can be taken with coconut oil and vinegar. Some of the fats in coconut oil are antimicrobial. I don't see that the carrot itself is antimicrobial... but that the coconut oil can be delivered via the carrot to the gut, where the antimicrobial and other properties of the Coconut oil could act.

There must be some other acceptable sources of cellulose besides just carrot and bamboo shoots... Maybe parsnips (you know, the white carrot like roots...)

I believe that iceberg lettuce is primarily cellulose, but the leaves may contain "radioactive cesium"... by its sweet taste I think a small amount would be otherwise acceptable somewhere beneath the grated carrot assuming it's (the Iceberglettuce) organic and doesn't have the cesium. haha.

Can anyone think of other sources of cellulose that are good and meet the criteria for consumption?
 

narouz

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WilltoBelieve said:
Peat's research shows that cellulose is the type of fiber that increases transit time and reduces estrogen without known negative effects. He has also written that it can be taken with coconut oil and vinegar. Some of the fats in coconut oil are antimicrobial. I don't see that the carrot itself is antimicrobial... but that the coconut oil can be delivered via the carrot to the gut, where the antimicrobial and other properties of the Coconut oil could act.

There must be some other acceptable sources of cellulose besides just carrot and bamboo shoots... Maybe parsnips (you know, the white carrot like roots...)

I believe that iceberg lettuce is primarily cellulose, but the leaves may contain "radioactive cesium"... by its sweet taste I think a small amount would be otherwise acceptable somewhere beneath the grated carrot assuming it's (the Iceberglettuce) organic and doesn't have the cesium. haha.

Can anyone think of other sources of cellulose that are good and meet the criteria for consumption?

Will2-
On the cellulose.
Peat does talk about different kinds of fiber,
and how some are better or worse for us humans.
To be honest, I've wanted to bear down on that question for a while
and get a better understanding of Peat and fiber...but so far I confess a realm of ignorance there.

But generally speaking,
Peat seems quite anti-fiber:
recommends one drink pulp-free OJ,
recommends adding a good saturated fat to foods like potatoes and white rice
to mitigate the harmful effect of the fiber therein, etc

And on the specific carrot and bamboo shoot fiber:
he does say that those fibers are somewhat unique
in that they do themselves possess an anti-microbial property.
The carrot salad he says adds to that inherent carrot-fiber microbisidosity (yes, I just made that up :eek: )
with the coconut oil and vinegar and perhaps even salt.

I don't think I've ever read Peat even faintly recommend any other kind of fiber.
 

WilltoBelieve

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"And on the specific carrot and bamboo shoot fiber:
he does say that those fibers are somewhat unique
in that they do themselves possess an anti-microbial property.
The carrot salad he says adds to that inherent carrot-fiber microbisidosity (yes, I just made that up :eek: )
with the coconut oil and vinegar and perhaps even salt."


Can you remember where you read or heard him talk about the carrot's "microbisidosity" (copyright - narouz 2012) ???
 

gretchen

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I'm wondering if there is any difference between eating the carrot by itself and actually grating it up. I often just eat the carrot by itself last thing before going to sleep.
 

charlie

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I honestly dont see how it would be much different, it all gets chewed up anyways. Although it is good to have the salt, coconut oil and vinegar for many reasons.
 

Orchid

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Grating it is said to make it easier on the digestive tract, but I just eat the whole carrot anyway. I'm too lazy to actually make the salad.
 

narouz

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I tend to think similarly.
But I do have to think Peat sees some increased potency
with the salad.
With the synergy of the different antimicrobial ingredients working in concert.
But also I think Peat may really like the grating
because it will likely be a superior medium:
sortuv pre-masticated.
Then it will be further masticated by the teeth.
I'm thinking he likes the finer granularity.
And then those finer bits are individually pre-coated with other antimicrobials.

Once in a while he will just say "carrot."
But more often, it seems to me, he takes the trouble to say "carrot salad."
 

Orchid

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^Right, it's also a lot easier on your teeth. Several times I've found myself sort of wincing while biting into a carrot because of how freaking hard it is.
 

Kris

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there are many kinds of fibers in food. the carrot fiber is soluble, it acts as a sponge. I think it is called mucilage. I am not sure how different it makes from other sources of fiber, with exact the same type of fiber.
 

HDD

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Using a Ninja has made it a lot quicker/easier to prepare and eat.
 

charlie

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Yeh he does look like he could tear some carrots up! :lol:
 

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