How Does Peat Get His Papers?

Discussion in 'Articles & Newsletters Discussion' started by Acarpous, Oct 16, 2017.

  1. Acarpous

    Acarpous Member

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    Does he have a friend in academia?

    Anyone have any idea?
     
  2. tara

    tara Member

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    Apparently he learned to use libraries early in life.
    He's also taught in Universities, and I would expect he has contacts amongst a number of academics and researchers.
     
  3. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    He WAS in academia. I don't believe your access expires.
     
  4. Badger

    Badger Member

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    If he was a savvy academic, he likely also got to know the university library's reference/research librarians very well, and treated them nice and gave them gifts once in a while. ;) Having been one myself, I know for a fact such folks can speed the progress of an academic's library research work by light years.
     
  5. DrJ

    DrJ Member

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    Probably from the university library. They all have subscriptions to the journals to some degree or another. If you have a (public) university near you and want to use the library, just go in and talk to the librarian. At the least you can probably use whatever materials you want as long as they don't leave the library. Librarians are usually pretty helpful, actually love helping people, and are all about spreading the knowledge. If you get a grumpy librarian, try the next one. If a public university, it is basically publicly funded, so you should be all up in there like you own it because philosophically you do (at least in the USA). The whole scheme of tax funds going to purchase ridiculously expensive journal subscriptions to read about research that was itself funded by tax revenue and then reviewed for free by professors (the unpaid journal editors) whose salaries are paid by tax dollars is a total racket par excellence. Most librarians are quite aware of this questionable moral situation and will generally hook you up.

    So act like the nice, civic-minded and society-building human being that you are, talk to the librarian, and tell them what you're trying to do, and probably things will go well. Just again, most likely you can't take things from the library since they don't really have a way to track you in their system, but no big deal.

    The older journal publications you can find in the stacks (90s and earlier). The newer stuff (which is usually worse lol) is more often online. You used to could walk right up to a library computer, get access to the journal, and print the articles either for free or for a few cents per page. Probably now they make you login with a student ID. But again, talk to the librarian and see if there's a guest account, or sometimes they will just get it for you. There's a university hospital near me with a medical library, and I've gone in there many times to pull articles from the stacks and make copies (at 5 cents/page) to take home. The article would otherwise cost me $35+ beyond what I already paid for it in taxes for both the subscription and the research.

    Also, checkout archive.org and see if you can get the article through there on inter-library loan. This is not totally full-proof, but easy to let the fingers do the work on an attempt.

    As an alternative, if you're just trying to learn stuff, check out the Dover books. They're old texts out of copyright that they reprint and sell for really cheap; usually less than $15. The new textbooks are total garbage and made so that they can change them often to combat used book sales. They're also designed to be "chunked" into 60-minute lesson plans, but let's face it: some knowledge takes more concentration, time, and background development than an hour college course lesson to learn. The old books do you right. I've replaced most of my expensive text books with Dover books as references. They're also usually easier to digest. The new books on core subjects have this tone like we're gods who understand this stuff, have always understood this stuff, and if you don't get it you're a moron, too bad. Wrong. More likely it was written by a professor trying to get a book deal who barely understands it himself, and is mostly copying stuff out of context from older texts, but has to take that tone to seem authoritative and fend off suspicion of his own ignorance. Read the old books where they were just getting a handle on stuff and the author's tone will be more along the lines of: so far we've observed this, tried this, thought of these possibilities, eliminated certain ideas, and this is what we came to. It brings you up to speed in a natural manner, making it much easier to follow and build an intuitive knowledge from. From about 1910 to 1950 was the golden age of text books, and not much new has really happened in most of the core subjects since then. So get a good deal and get a good knowledge-building opportunity.
     
  6. moss

    moss Member

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    Great post Dr J

    And the final paragraph so true.

    I use to buy quite a few old texts out of copyright, and in fact, from a book seller in Phoenix AZ. By The Book L C, it seems their website is no long active.
    A good University library has been invaluable over the years.
     
  7. SQu

    SQu Member

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    Great post thank you

    May I ask what your recommended titles are?
     
  8. DrJ

    DrJ Member

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    @SQu I guess depends on subject. I'm heavy in engineering and physics. Here's a list of what I have so far:

    [​IMG]
    Plasma Physics (Dover Books on Physics)

    Drummond, James E.
    -Best plasma physics book I've found. Maybe some of Alfven's books are better on certain topics.

    [​IMG]
    Theoretical Physics (Dover Books on Physics) Dover Books on Physics

    Georg Joos, Ira M. Freeman
    Sold by: Amazon.com LLC
    -Math heavy but solid book.

    [​IMG]
    General Chemistry (Dover Books on Chemistry) Dover Books on Chemistry

    Linus Pauling
    -YES! I've always sucked at chemistry, and here Pauling explains it from the start, so things that seemed nonsensical to me in chemistry now make sense b/c it describes how they were thinking when they came up with the terminology.

    [​IMG]
    An Introduction to Information Theory: Symbols, Signals and Noise (Dover Books on Mathematics) Dover Books on Mathematics

    Pierce, John R.
    -Great into the heavier stuff, but for an intro to information theory it's best to just read Shannon's original paper which is very easy to follow.

    [​IMG]
    Introduction to Artificial Intelligence: Second, Enlarged Edition (Dover Books on Mathematics)

    Jackson, Philip C.
    -Some more stuff has happened, and you might have to get a newer text to cover that, but this gets a lot of the basics that are still in use.

    [​IMG]
    Introduction to Graph Theory (Dover Books on Mathematics)

    Richard J. Trudeau
    -I got real bored with this and didn't finish.


    [​IMG]
    Introduction to Topology: Third Edition (Dover Books on Mathematics)

    Mendelson, Bert, Mathematics
    -Easiest to follow book I've come across on this subject.

    [​IMG]
    Atomic Physics: 8th Edition (Dover Books on Physics)

    Born, Max, Physics
    -This is another book where you get to follow the line of thinking as the subject was discovered and explored with experiment. Born is good at explaining things.

    [​IMG]
    The Philosophy of Space and Time (Dover Books on Physics)

    Hans Reichenbach
    -Just an interesting side read

    [​IMG]
    Strength of Materials (Dover Books on Engineering)

    J. P. Den Hartog
    -Replaced my college Mech of Materials book with this. Much better and deeper explanations in this one.

    [​IMG]
    Mechanics (Dover Books on Physics)

    Hartog, J. P. Den, Physics
    -Could self-teach yourself mechanics from this if you wanted. Doesn't shy away from math, though.

    [​IMG]
    Integral, Measure and Derivative: A Unified Approach (Dover Books on Mathematics)

    G. E. Shilov, B. L. Gurevich
    -If you want to understand the building blocks of a lot of advanced math subjects


    [​IMG]
    Non-Euclidean Geometry (Dover Books on Mathematics)

    Stefan Kulczycki, Stanislaw Knapowski
    -Niche reading. Not really recommended unless you like this stuff.

    [​IMG]
    Special Functions for Scientists and Engineers (Dover Books on Mathematics)

    W. W. Bell
    -General math reference.

    Also, the book Modern Optics by Grant Fowles is a great optics book from Dover that didn't show up in my order history for some reason. I replaced the much more expensive optics book by Hecht that is usually standard for teaching optics. This was much easier to follow and more practical than Hecht.
     
  9. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

    WoW. Thank you.
     
  10. SQu

    SQu Member

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    That's quite a list. Thank you!
     
  11. Mountain

    Mountain Member

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    @DrJ Thank you for the Dover Books suggestion!
     
  12. artlange

    artlange Member

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    I use sci-hub.io for papers behind a paywall. sems to work better for papers with a DOI number. not so well for PMID numbers.
     
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