How Do You Disprove This Study (and Other Of Such Types [a-Ray Peat])

Discussion in 'Metabolism' started by Mr. God of Cars, May 19, 2018.

  1. Mr. God of Cars

    Mr. God of Cars Member

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    "OBJECTIVES:
    Type 2 diabetes and the consumption of saturated fatty acids (FAs) are on the rise among Alaska Inuits. This analysis, based on a cross-sectional study, explores the possible associations of saturated FA content in red blood cells (RBCs) and parameters of glucose metabolism in a sample of Alaska Natives.

    STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:
    The sample included 343 women and 282 men aged 35-74. Statistical analyses explored the associations of selected RBC (myristic, palmitic and stearic acids) FAs with fasting glucose (plasma), fasting insulin (plasma), 2h glucose (2-hour glucose tolerance test), 2h insulin and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index. The models included sex and glucose metabolism status as fixed factors and age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, physical activity (METS) and FA content in RBCs as covariates. Measures of insulin, glucose and HOMA index were used as dependent variables.

    RESULTS:
    Myristic acid was positively associated with fasting insulin (β=0.47, p<0.001), 2h insulin (β=0.53, p=0.02) and HOMA index (β=0.455, p<0.001). Palmitic acid was associated with 2h glucose (β=2.3×10(-2), p<0.001) and 2h insulin (β=5.6×10(-2), p=0.002) and stearic acid was associated with fasting glucose (β=4.8×10(-3), p=0.006).

    CONCLUSIONS:
    These results strongly support the hypothesis that saturated fatty acids are associated with insulin resistance and glucose intolerance and that saturated fatty acids are significant risk factors for type 2 diabetes."

    How do you disprove, or where is the flaw in this, study? [Maybe I should read the full version of it, but I haven't.]
     
  2. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    Makes sense. But this is the flaw.

    These results strongly support the hypothesis that saturated fatty acids are associated with insulin resistance and glucose intolerance and that saturated fatty acids are significant risk factors for type 2 diabetes."

    This part of the conclusion lacks foundation.
     
  3. Lurker

    Lurker Member

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    Free fatty acids —> diabetes. Sounds about right.
     
  4. benaoao

    benaoao Member

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    The flaw is to make it sound like saturated are worse than other fats. All fats - besides mct i guess - are associated with insulin resistance and glucose intolerance (and hypothyroidism and GERD and inflammation and...) which may eventually lead to T2D. That is, if eaten in excess
     
  5. OP
    Mr. God of Cars

    Mr. God of Cars Member

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    But Ray Peat wrote that saturated fats increase pyruvate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that oxidizes glucose, so these fats should lower glycemia over time (less than 2 hour!?).

    But, since the medical profession think diabetes is hyperglycemia and that its complications are caused by hyperglycemia (instead by glycopenia or low intracellular glucose levels or low cellular levels, followed by its mitochondrial oxidation), then I should believe they are wrong about saturated fats causing "diabetes".

    What no medical doctor or study mentions (to my knowledge) is the fact that starches are more glycemic than sucrose and that hyperglycemia can be caused by hypoglycemia, mediated by cortisol's gluconeogenic effects.
     
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