• Due to excessive bot signups along with nefarious actors we are limiting forum registration. Keep checking back for the register link to appear. Please do not send emails or have someone post to the forum asking for a signup link. Until the current climate changes we do not see a change of this policy. To join the forum you must have a compelling reason. Letting us know what skills/knowledge you will bring to the community along with the intent of your stay here will help in getting you approved.

Honeydew Melons

pboy

Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2013
Messages
1,681
http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fru ... ces/1956/2

besides slight Phos/Cal excess...which is probably made up for by high magnesium, they seem like a solid food...I was wondering if any one else has experimented with them. The reason im mainly interested is because they have a PH above 6...so you wouldn't run into excess acidity. I suppose you could even juice it by hand and add some sugar to balance out the slight hypotonic water in it...or cook it even to make more gentle. Only thing im a bit weary of is that a lot of squash family foods have allergens, but its probably only in the seeds/skin
 

HDD

Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2012
Messages
2,040
I got a wonderful fruit salad recipe with honeydew, plums, sweetened condensed milk, and lime. I LOVED it!!! Digestive wise, it killed me. I even went back and ate it again to see if it was the fruit salad and had the same problem. :( I was so bummed. My son didn't seem to have a problem with it.
 

jaa

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2012
Messages
1,035
They're a staple for me. I find them great for hydration as well and crave them after a night out.
 

loess

Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2013
Messages
338
Love them, though it's a drag when you get one that's a dud and not sweet at all. But a good one is like the nectar of the gods. I usually "juice" them by straining out the flesh using a fine mesh bag and squeezing, but I do that with most fruits.
 

HDD

Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2012
Messages
2,040
Haagendazendiane said:
I got a wonderful fruit salad recipe with honeydew, plums, sweetened condensed milk, and lime. I LOVED it!!! Digestive wise, it killed me. I even went back and ate it again to see if it was the fruit salad and had the same problem. :( I was so bummed. My son didn't seem to have a problem with it.


My problem could have been from an activated charcoal capsule I had taken a day or so before. I'll have to give it a try again.
 

pboy

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Jan 22, 2013
Messages
1,681
plums are the highest sorbitol fruit...id think way before charcoal was the problem, the plum would be. Plums and prunes are violent on digestion, and cause blowout on the back end often times
 

BingDing

Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
976
Location
Tennessee, USA
FWIW, forum member Bradley posted about ripe melons here.

For watermelons:

- They should have a deep yellow patch, this is where the melon sat on the ground. Watermelons without this patch were picked too early.
- They should be very firm. A softer outer means it's old.
- Hold the melon in the palm of one hand, close to your ear. Slap it with the other hand. The more it reverberates like a bass drum, the juicier and crispier it will be


For cantaloupes

- the outside should have some give
- the more beige/orange the outside, the better. Green = unripe and may not become sweet
- with your thumb, rub where the vine was attached. Then smell the area, the more fragrant, the sweeter and riper
- flip the melon over and push on the bottom with your thumb, it should have a good amount of give


For honeydews

- Like cantaloupes, the outer should have give, and the bottom should depress to the touch
- the skin should have a tacky/sticky feel. The stickier the outside, the more concentrated the sugars inside. Smooth and slippery = unripe and not sweet
- a super-ripe honeydew will be fragrant, but not always


There are many other varieties, but the above tips will work for all of them.

My ongoing rant about the food supply, I could not find a single ripe cantaloupe or honeydew in a grocery store in town. But a got a last of the summer cantaloupe from a farm stand and it was heavenly.
 

Gl;itch.e

Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2014
Messages
733
Age
39
Location
New Zealand
I love melons! Honeydew especially. This is a fruit that I feel really good with. Have no issues at all.
 

pboy

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Jan 22, 2013
Messages
1,681
things are looking good for the honeydew...nice
 

HDD

Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2012
Messages
2,040
pboy said:
plums are the highest sorbitol fruit...id think way before charcoal was the problem, the plum would be. Plums and prunes are violent on digestion, and cause blowout on the back end often times

I learn something new every day! I assumed it was the melon because I have had some watermelon this year that gave me problems. The honeydew was ripe and delicious. I normally don't eat plums. Since I had not taken charcoal before, it was also suspect. Thanks for that info pboy. I will try the recipe again without plums. :D
 

pboy

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Jan 22, 2013
Messages
1,681
yea I learned the hard way also...lol. On a side note also...watermelon has some mannitol which can be a bit harsh also (another sugar alcohol)...where as muskmelons like cantaloupe, and honeydews don't have any
 

Lin

Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2014
Messages
184
Location
San Francisco
I love honeydew, eat it with a little salt... delish! No issues.
@pboy if you are interested in acid alkaline balance, Cronometer has started showing nutrient balances, and one of them is PRAL alkalinity. This is for gold plan members, and it just started a few days ago. I was surprised to see how alkaline the Peat diet is. (I mean way alkaline!)
The other balances they show are sodium:potassium, calcium:magnesium, zinc:copper, and Omegas. I don't know how accurate it is, or how much attention to give it... totally feeds my OCD tendencies though.

Edit: guess I should have said the diet, as I eat it, is way alkaline. I could eat more acid, maybe should. Sorry this is off topic.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

pboy

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Jan 22, 2013
Messages
1,681
no that's pretty cool, sounds like something that could help a lot of people. I figured the Peat diet would be way alkaline cause there isn't a lot of muscle meat or fermented foods. I think I read that to some extent magnesium can help make up inbalance in Calcium Phosphorus which is a big thing that determines alkaline acid balance, which is probably why fruits still come out alkaline a lot of times. Then you have to consider phenolic acids, organic acids, and other things. Id be highly surprised if someone actually had such accurate data or formulas as to make a programs that told exactly how a food would turn out...cause im not sure there is that accurate of scientific date to prove one way or another. But that's a nice idea and I hope its pretty accurate and helps people. Its probably a good thing that your diet is way alkaline, besides the required acidic vitamins and minerals (amino acids, iodine, selenium, sulphur, molybdenum, phosphorus, chloride, ascorbic acid, nicotinic acid, pantothenic acid) none of the other acids that are in foods are actually required, and in fact burden your bodies buffering systems. So I don't think there would be any benefit in consuming more. Too high concentration leads to burning sensations and even can provoke watery or rapid intestinal clearouts
 
Top