• @Blossom Is A Blessing To This Community, Let Us Be A Blessing To Her
    Click Here For More Information
  • Due to excessive bot signups along with nefarious actors we are limiting forum registration. Keep checking back for the register link to appear. Please do not send emails or have someone post to the forum asking for a signup link. Until the current climate changes we do not see a change of this policy. To join the forum you must have a compelling reason. Letting us know what skills/knowledge you will bring to the community along with the intent of your stay here will help in getting you approved.

Homemade Gelatin Vs. Commercial Gelatin

DMF

Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2012
Messages
363
I'll have a big roast in the oven for a couple of hours, with the juice collected in a glass jar, put in the freezer so the "top" will form the fat which I discard and the gel (gelatin/gravy?) underneith. Now, about that "gel" - how would it compare, in composition, to say, Great Lakes Beef Gelatin, or even the hydrolysate stuff? Sure, nothing beats the real McCoy, but I'm really curious.
 

nwo2012

Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2012
Messages
1,107
DMF said:
I'll have a big roast in the oven for a couple of hours, with the juice collected in a glass jar, put in the freezer so the "top" will form the fat which I discard and the gel (gelatin/gravy?) underneith. Now, about that "gel" - how would it compare, in composition, to say, Great Lakes Beef Gelatin, or even the hydrolysate stuff? Sure, nothing beats the real McCoy, but I'm really curious.

I think that it will be very comparable in terms of amino acid content if there is enough of it and plenty of joints etc.
 

Bruv

Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2013
Messages
90
I have about a mug of homemade gelatin every day. Is this a good amount?
 

Ari

Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2013
Messages
79
If the stuff you made at home turns into jello then it is going to be just fine. As far as knowing the nutritional content of a homemade broth/gelatin/soup, it's very tough, since there are too many variables.

One thing you could try is to buy the store gelatin, turn it into a solution of water + gelatin, and get it to be the same 'jellyness' as your homemade gelatin per unit of volume. This could be a good start to letting you know how much protein you may or may not have.

As far as I see it though, the homemade stuff is the 'real McCoy'. Everything else is asking you to put trust into someone else and their methods and processes.

Beef tendons... they are the way to go.

You know the homemade stuff is good when the gel is stiff enough to turn the pot over without anything falling out. But even without out, it's all worth eating.
 

Bruv

Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2013
Messages
90
Ari said:
If the stuff you made at home turns into jello then it is going to be just fine. As far as knowing the nutritional content of a homemade broth/gelatin/soup, it's very tough, since there are too many variables.
I'm not a highly tuned athlete or really that up on the ins and outs of exactly what I need to be getting in the way of vitamins and minerals, so for now, as long as I know I'm getting about the right amount (not too much, not too little) of gelatin and don't need to be buying packs of it (which looks to be more trouble than it's worth down here) then I am happy. Thanks :D
 

jc.

New Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2013
Messages
3
Hi, everybody,

Noob to this, but I've been reading Ray Peat for a while. Seems like home made gelatin is the traditional way to get the goodies you want. A cup a day seems about right. Very soothing, especially during the coming fall and winter. I have bought the Great Lakes hydrolysate because I'm too lazy to make home made between roasts, and it is pretty easy to use, 'cause you don't have to let it set, etc. :2cents
 

Similar threads

Top