Higher Muscle Mass Extends Life Expectancy

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Jun 14, 2014.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    People with more muscle mass also have higher metabolism. Even though the study did not make the connection between muscle mass and metabolism, it strengthens Ray's point that resistance exercise (only the concentric portion) is very protective.

    http://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-934 ... 7/abstract
     
  2. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    Yes, I remember Ray Peat said body builders live longer in a radio interview.
     
  3. jyb

    jyb Member

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    Hum...but that study is about normal older adults. So there is a pretty obvious confounding factor, if you are healhier, you also have better hormones and energy, which help maintain muscle mass.
     
  4. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    Well, the input can be seen as output and vice versa. This is the basic teaching of Raymond Peat. Life has shifting equilibriums, and they exhibit a sort of symmetry.
     
  5. ScurveDream

    ScurveDream Member

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    Hate to want to bring this thread back up, but it's probably better than starting a new one just like it.

    So if there's association of exercise induced muscle mass helping in health/longevity in some ways, is it optimal in the tradeoff/face of fatigue and/or hypothyroid symptoms? Metabolic syndrome? I'm wondering here. Say someone has little muscle mass and little energy. Would it benefit them to try and build some more muscle mass -- even if in light exercise -- to have a more longstanding health profile combined with diet? I don't think encouraging one to remain inactive over prolonged time is good.

    Some people here are very anti-stress and do not support the "exercise if easily fatigued" idea (which makes sense) -- but by doing so, we avoid the exercise that can help us build muscle mass and could help our health. So what would be optimal? It sounds hard to decide because it can be both helpful and harmful simultaneously.

    I do get fatigued pretty easily by exercise, but not really light stuff. I'm thinking I should incorporate some at least a few times a week, but don't want to stress myself. I also don't know how much more I should eat if I were to steadily and gradually add in more heavier stuff again like running, moderate/bigger weights, etc. I don't want to eat a whopping, giant amount of extra calories and end up gaining unnecessary bodyfat -- but don't want to eat the same as if I was mostly inactive. It can be tough finding that "sweet spot" in the middle where it isn't too much but not too little either (when it comes to building muscle (not fat) while reducing stress from working out).

    I come from a background of crash dieting/overeating/undereating/high PUFA/obesity/excessive exercise over long times -- others here probably know the drill.
     
  6. sladerunner69

    sladerunner69 Member

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    Weighttraining is beneficial to metabolic health but should not be overdone. I would recommend a wonderful little reference guide called "Body By Science". The author sought to find the "optimal" workout regimen for health, longevity, and metabolism. While his nutrition/dietary advice is generally low calorie and doesn't align well with Peat, it does provide very good work out advice. It prescribed low volume, low frequency, high intensity workouts. It advises using well designed machines rather than free weights to help prevent joint problems. IT advises using moderate-light weight, and to exaggerate the negative portion of the rep, and to move very slowly and steadily through the rep. This is because fast paced reps at higher weights induce the release of cortisol and stress hormones, while compromising the joints.
     
  7. Kingpinguin

    Kingpinguin Member

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    My suggestion is to exercise tailored for you and no one else. Theres so many factors you have to take into account when exercising that will tell you how much you should lift, how long your workouts you need, how much rest you should take, signs if your ready to go to the gym and how much you need to eat. Just following a program and lifting a lot will not make you muscular and healthy. Listening to your body and following it along the process will make you very strong metabolically aswell. I workout regularly but at the same time i listen very carefully to my body. And I have the highest temps, energy and mood Ive ever had. Exercise is awesome when done right. When done wrong its very demanding and taxing and will drain you. I would recommend to start to workout. Start with smaller muscles and avoid legs and back at the start. They are big muscles and will hurt your metabolism if you train them and dont know rest and consumption of carbs. Train your arms, shoulders, chest and stomach. Dont go to the gym if you feel either muscle soreness or fatigue. Focus on carbs, mainly sugars but some starches like rice and eat 100 grams of protein daily. If you have fatigue problems already prior to exercise then address that first. You cant exercise otherwise. It wont increase energy and health if your already fatigued. If you have chronic fatigue you are sick and need to figure out why.
     
  8. redsun

    redsun Member

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    Its pretty difficult(I say near impossible) to gain weight if there is not food/substances creating or exacerbating gut inflammation. Inflammation itself can also cause fatigue. There is chain of cause and effect that happens when our health degrades that is hard to follow and there can be many twists and turns but in the end it all starts with inadequate nutrition, food intolerance(either inherent, or caused by gut damage or deficiencies). Not just enough Bs, but every nutrient. This is why getting nutrients from whole foods is always preferable.

    Have you ever done a zero or near zero fiber diet? This would heal the gut assuming nutrition is on point. Meat, dairy, and eggs + low fiber fruits should easily provide most nutrients, except perhaps K2 and E which can be supplemented or get K2 from pastured eggs and aged cheeses and supplement E.

    A nutrient dense diet and fixing gut health and therefore a major source of inflammation should majorly help fatigue.
     
  9. sladerunner69

    sladerunner69 Member

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    Do you beliebe healing gut inflammation, and the resultant decrease in serotonin, can also help to lower bodyfat?
     
  10. redsun

    redsun Member

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    Absolutely, this is why its common for those to do all sorts of elimination diets to lose weight. Not only are they losing edema caused by inflammation, but they also lose body fat because of the decrease in serotonin(which promotes adiposity) and other inflammatory and anti-metabolic hormones like cortisol, prolactin, and estrogen. Serotonin can increase all of these and inhibit testosterone and dopamine.
     
  11. ExCarniv

    ExCarniv Member

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    I think this is an interesting talk about exercise and metabolism.

     
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