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"High Quality Protein"

Discussion in 'Protein' started by j., Feb 22, 2013.

  1. j.

    j. Guest

    Ray Peat often mentions that high quality protein can be obtained from milk, cheese, potatoes, and eggs. Soy protein is of bad quality. I suppose he is talking from a thyroid/liver perspective. Protein that helps the liver convert T4 to T3 is high quality protein. Did he arrive to these conclusion based on studies, or maybe amino acid analysis?
     
  2. narouz

    narouz Member

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    I think it is definitely amino acid profile, j.
    But isn't it also calcium:phospate ratio?
    He may consider other aspects I'm forgetting.

    On the potato: he does say it is very high quality protein,
    but on the other hand it would seem to me
    that one would have to eat a LOT of potatoes to get to the kind of daily levels of protein intake
    he recommends.
    Peat did, somewhere, seem to try to take up for the potato's protein percentage
    by comparing it to milk but--pointing out that milk was liquid while potatoes are not, and...
    ...I never really understood what he was saying there.

    Unless one does the Peat Potato Extract thing
    then one is getting a lot of starch and fiber (and fat--needed to ameliorate the starch)
    along with that protein too.

    On the question of whether his views on proteins are thyroid and liver centered,
    I would think he is thinking more broadly there--about overall metabolism.
     
  3. OP
    j.

    j. Guest

    Found this quote in Nutrition for Women, fifth edition, page 99.

     
  4. narouz

    narouz Member

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    I'm not sure how exactly to interpret that.
    "...higher than it should be..."--than it should be according to what?
    And what are these "amino acid equivalents" his student found?
    He is probably talking about those keto acids or whatever they are--
    he talks about them when discussing the Peat potato extract.
    As I recall they can be converted quickly to aminos...?

    Overall, I can't tell whether he is upgrading or downgrading potato protein there.
    That book was published in the '90's sometime, right?
    Seems like he has made the oft-cited pro-potato statements after that, much more recently.
     
  5. OP
    j.

    j. Guest

    Yeah, 93. The way I interpret it is that the quality is higher that one would expect based on amino acid analysis. I looked some pages after that for a reference but couldn't find anything.
     
  6. Jellyfish

    Jellyfish Member

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    They contain essential amino acids and are complete proteins.

    Soy contain all essential amino acids but I dont know if it is complete protein. It has too much toxins.

    Potatoes contain keto acids which can be converted to amino acids.
     
  7. key

    key Member

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    Ray said 1lb potato=1 liter of milk(30g protein)

    According to cronometer 1lb potato has 10g protein. The keto acids combine with circulating ammonia and create amino acids.
     
  8. narouz

    narouz Member

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    key-
    Do you know where he said that?
    If true, that sounds a lot more feasible, from a sheer protein approach, than I've thought.

    How much is one pound of potato, I wonder.
    Would a large russet baking potato weigh about a pound?

    If so, then that would be pretty amazing to me:
    one such potato would give you the equivalent of about 2 quarts of milk. :shock:

    I don't know...I'll have to see more proof of this. :roll:
     
  9. key

    key Member

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    he said it in an interview with herb man(i think or maybe Eastwest)

    a couple big russets is a pound and it's the equivalent of 1 quart(1 liter)
     
  10. narouz

    narouz Member

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    Thanks, key.
    If this is so it makes me re-think potatoes.
    I still can't see how all the starch and fiber adds up to a good deal
    even given the surprising protein numbers you've noted.

    But...it makes me re-evaluate the Ray Peat Potato Extract.
    What I've had against it was that it was so much work for such a small amount of yield.
    If you've made it you'll know what I mean.
    But: if what is left contains that much great protein...well, that would make it worth while.

    The juice from two big russets is not gonna be a lot.
    I'm guessing, from experience, less than a cup.
    It's still hard for me to believe that amount of potato juice is going to equal the protein in 2 quarts of milk. :roll:
     
  11. key

    key Member

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    "It's still hard for me to believe that amount of potato juice is going to equal the protein in 2 quarts of milk."

    It's 1 qt. 28g protein. 2qts=56g protein.

    I don't think RPPE is worth it unless you are wasting away and you can't barely eat.

    "I still can't see how all the starch and fiber adds up to a good deal"

    Ray infered the fiber from potatoes is beneficial in an interview(the positive study people use for recommendations of grain fiber i.e. bran are based on africans eating majority potatoes). But the starch seems to be inferior to sucrose in basically any situation. I personally prefer sugar foods. And protein from milk,chicharrones,& egg.
     
  12. Dean

    Dean Member

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    When I steamrolled through all of Dr. Peat's radio interviews several months back, I do recall him saying a pound of potatoes was equal to the protein in a liter of milk. At the time, I thought he misspoke or I misheard him; and I forgot about it. But now that key brings it up, I guess I heard it right.

    My knowledge of body chemistry is abysmal, but it could be one of those things like gelatin being a protein sparer. If keto acids combine with ammonia to provide an equivalent of one liter of milk's protein from a pound of potatoes, that makes you wonder why potatoes (or at least potato juice) don't get much play from Peat or draw more interest from Peaters, but also explains better why Peat refuses to be entirely dismissive of potatoes.

    As key says, there are easier, more optimal and less stressful ways to get protein. But for someone like myself who would like to get their protein content much higher (about double of where it is now), being able to take in a good chunk of that with a little bit of potato juice is an intriguing prospect. I don't know how else I could double it and keep tryptophan and fat intake down. I don't know how I could double the amount of dairy I am taking in either in terms of tolerance and metabolic activity/fullness either.

    I've been kind of dragging my feet on getting that juicer, especially since I'd kind of dismissed that Peat statement from my mind and haven't seen the personal testimonials here or elsewhere as to its benefits. I'd been thinking of it though in terms of whether it was worth peeling, juicing, and consuming a 10 pound bag of Russets every day to get 30 grams of protein (considering that most of the protein in a potato is supposedly just beneath the skin). A couple pounds a day seems more feasible especially if I want to get up to 150 grams of protein a day without having to double my milk intake, or increase fat and tryptophan.

    It would be nice to hear Dr. Peat expound on this more. Perhaps this is why so many here eat potatoes. They don't want to bother with juicing and feel dealing with the starch and fiber in the potatoes is worth the trade off for maximizing protein levels? Of course, I don't know why they just don't say that. Maybe you are right, narouz. They want it to be their little secret? :? :mrgreen:
     
  13. biggirlkisss

    biggirlkisss Member

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    The protein of the protein of the potato, milk gelatin are all your friends.
     
  14. lazz

    lazz Member

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    I have no idea what kind of milk y'all drinking but 2qts of organic valley skim milk gives me 64g of protein.
     
  15. fyo

    fyo Member

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    There were a couple (older) studies where a few working men and women consumed almost nothing but potato for a year, and seemed fine.
     
  16. jyb

    jyb Member

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    For me, it has more measurable effect than thyroid supplement. I don't see it as a source of protein but of energy.
     
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