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High Blood Sugar, Hypertension Is Protective In The Very Old Fat Diabetic People?

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by ecstatichamster, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    Dr. Peat is right again.

    The metabolic syndrome is associated with decelerated cognitive decline in the oldest old

    The metabolic syndrome was associated with a decelerated cognitive decline from age 85 to 90 on the Mini-Mental State Examination (additional annual effect 0.18 [0.07], p = 0.01), the Stroop Test (−1.49 [0.59], p = 0.01), and the Letter Digit Coding Test (0.26 [0.09], p = 0.005). This effect was mainly attributable to glucose, body mass index, and, to a lesser extent, blood pressure.

    Conclusion: The association between the metabolic syndrome and accelerated cognitive decline, which has been reported in persons up to age 75, is not evident in a population of the oldest old. The concept of the metabolic syndrome may be less valid in this age group.

    The study conclusion is PC bullpucky. The study shows clearly that those who are fatter, higher blood sugar, have LESS cognitive decline as they get very old. The other biomarkers are probably better as well.
     
  2. Peatful

    Peatful Member

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    Interesting.
    Where does Peat say -or write -this agreed conclusion?
     
  3. OP
    ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    Dr. Peat has said higher blood pressure is protective for old people and that higher blood sugar than "normal" can be protective.
     
  4. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I remember the part about higher heart rate. I don't recall the higher blood pressure or the higher blood sugar though. Although his reasoning for higher heart rate could very well apply to higher blood pressure.

    I also think that having higher blood pressure and not "just taking drugs to have the semblance of normality in bp" is better than the common course of action. Maybe the peeps with lower blood pressure aka "normal" aren't as healthy because of the cumulative damage from the side-effects of the drugs.
     
  5. OP
    ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    It was higher pressure in old people. Not young people.
     
  6. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I was referring to old people as well. The distinction is only a matter of prevalence.
     
  7. Beastmode

    Beastmode Member

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    We've been able to get my 94 year old grandma's bp up to 110/70 range from 80's/40's range.

    Her cognition has improved quite a bit. Thanks to ole T3 and now progesterone/dhea mix :)

    Doctors are f#$%$ clueless.
     
  8. OP
    ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    I believe that Dr. Zajicek explained this. He suggests high blood pressure is protective by forcing blood into stiffer and more clogged blood vessels to oxygenate tissue that otherwise would become hypoxic.

    Blood pressure and glucose are related and the "normal" should naturally increase as we age.



    [​IMG]
     
  9. schultz

    schultz Member

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    I am very sceptical of the idea that high amounts of sugar in the blood really cause problems directly. I e-mailed Ray about this a while back and his answer suggests that glucose is increased adaptively (well, he says that so I guess he is not just "suggesting" lol).

    I essentially asked him if he thinks it is the sugar itself causing the damage or if it is something else.

    He said this to me...

    Re: Hyperglycemia
    "In tissue culture experiments, very high glucose has harmful effects, but those conditions don’t reflect what happens in the whole organism. Glucose in the blood is increased adaptively to protect against something that’s damaging the tissues, and that’s usually a hormone imbalance that is interfering with the ability to oxidize glucose. The “glycation” that’s usually blamed on high glucose is mostly caused by lipid peroxidation from polyunsaturated fats, and the glycerol that’s liberated by lipolysis, and metabolized to methylglyoxal. The fats block glucose metabolism for energy, and more glucose is produced to overcome that."


    He has talked about a few of these ideas before, like PUFA and glycation, the Randle cycle, peroxidation, but it somehow his answer summed it up nicely. The glycerol point is something I never thought of before. I have not looked deeply into that so maybe I will do some research and see what I find.
     
  10. OP
    ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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  11. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    This is good info. Listening to this, I felt a sense that the years (12+) years of steadily increasing blood pressure, culminating at a high of 240/140, were not a waste, as I resisted the urge to capitulate and go the medication route. For various fears that I could equate to old wives' tales (which aren't even so off), such as blood vessels bursting and kidneys failing. I wouldn't know if a person in such a state would survive longer, allowing the body's adaptive mechanism to take over, than someone in a similar state allowing for the various interventionist mechanisms (drugs and surgery) called health care.

    I only wonder, because I've since been able to lower my blood pressure significantly, to around 180/120. Recently, I'm getting more promising results with the use of fasting, which I would liken to a "total elimination diet." I was able to get 155/101, with a jump in heart rate from 59 to 94, but I need more time and data to claim victory. I suspect some substances I'm taking (considered Peaty) that gets in the way of this healing, and I would have to temporarily stop the intake of these substances to bring back homeostatic conditions at a lower blood pressure state.

    It comes down to being able to fully understand one's own context, being observant, and not to be given to a dogmatic interpretation of even the best studies, as it's an all too common tendency for us to try to fit the data into pre-ordained conclusions. And with making sense of inconsistencies that one experience along the way, which happens more often than not, as our collective experience would attest to. When healing does come along, I see it as a culmination of tying in loose threads into a coherent whole, and in this I find the influence of Peat and Ling to be strong. We don't run into fictitious rationalization in the form of pumps and membranes to make our analysis attain an air of coherence.
     
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