Hello, Any Supplier Interested In Carrying Allergy-Free Fructose?

Would you be interested in buying allergy-free free fructose to treat diabetes?

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yerrag

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I also would like to find a good source for fructose, as the fructose commonly found is made from corn, and Ray has talked about it being allergenic. I understand there are fructose that's derived from cane sugar and from beets. But I can't source them out. And when I do, I still have to make sure they are free from allergens.

Glucose and sucrose for diabetes. :

In 1874, E. Kulz in Germany reported that diabetics could assimilate fructose better than glucose. In the next decades there were several more reports on the benefits of feeding fructose, including the reduction of glucose in the urine. With the discovery of insulin in 1922, fructose therapy was practically forgotten, until the 1950s when new manufacturing techniques began to make it economical to use.
Its use in diabetic diets became so popular that it became available in health food stores, and was also used in hospitals for intravenous feeding.
However, while fructose was becoming popular, the cholesterol theory of heart disease was being promoted...

...In the 1950s, an English professor, John Yudkin, didn't accept the idea that eating saturated fat was the cause of high blood levels of triglycerides and cholesterol, but he didn’t question the theory that lipids in the blood caused the circulatory disease. He argued that it was sugar, especially the fructose component of sucrose, rather than dietary fat, that caused the high blood lipids seen in the affluent countries, and consequently the diseases...

...Following the publication of Yudkin's books, and coinciding with increasing promotion of the health benefits of unsaturated vegetable oils, many people were converted to Yudkin's version of the lipid theory of heart disease, i.e., that the "bad lipids" in the blood are the result of eating sugar. This has grown into essentially a cult, in which sugar is believed to act like an intoxicant, forcing people to eat until they become obese, and develop the "metabolic syndrome," and "diabetes," and the many problems that derive from that.


Such a shame that we can't find the fructose that used to be available in health food stores in the 1950's. Touche.

Are there any takers here who would give sourcing and selling allergy-free fructose a shot?
 

yerrag

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Isn't sucrose better option?glucose helps its absorption.
I didn't know that.

But isn't glucose what can't be metabolized because free fatty acids blocks it? And fructose gets metabolized regardless?
 

paymanz

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I didn't know that.

But isn't glucose what can't be metabolized because free fatty acids blocks it? And fructose gets metabolized regardless?
Im not sure about that,idk. It apparently is not insulin dependant , so if your insulin resistant , like when FFAs raised you still can use fructose.

But i read that not every type of cells can burn fructose.

Also glucose is essential , your body need it anyway, fructose cant replace it i believe. And your body converts a portion (maybe most of it!) To glycogen which then can be converted to glucose.

Idk how insulin dependant is glycogenesis processing of fructose.
 

paymanz

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I think ray also has mentioned that glucose helps fructose absorption. And one reasone fructose alone can be problematic is that it doesn't absorbs completely and then it feeds bacteria.
 

yerrag

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I think ray also has mentioned that glucose helps fructose absorption. And one reasone fructose alone can be problematic is that it doesn't absorbs completely and then it feeds bacteria.
Would this also be the case if the subject is unable to metabolize glucose because of having plenty of free fatty acids in the blood?

I can see your point in the danger of investing pure fructose, bacterial outgrowth would be a major concern.

Perhaps vitamin E - to protect against free fatty acids, aspirin against its metabolites, niacinamide against lipolysis, will allow glucose to be metabolized, thereby allowing it to help fructose absorption.
 

yerrag

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I think ray also has mentioned that glucose helps fructose absorption. And one reasone fructose alone can be problematic is that it doesn't absorbs completely and then it feeds bacteria.
Would this also be the case if the subject is unable to metabolize glucose because of having plenty of free fatty acids in the blood?

I can see your point in the danger of investing pure fructose, bacterial outgrowth would be a major concern.

Perhaps vitamin E - to protect against free fatty acids, aspirin against its metabolites, niacinamide against lipolysis, will allow glucose to be metabolized, thereby allowing it to help fructose absorption.

It would still be nice though to be able to have pure fructose and pure glucose so that one can have the flexibility to modify their ratio in the sugar mix, as opposed to being limited to the 5-:50 mix available in sucrose and in honey.

Haidut has mentioned pears as being high in fructose. At 70% fructose sugar content, it's worthy of consideration. To get say 1400 calories a day from it, a daily intake of 15 medium pears would be needed.
 
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paymanz

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Would this also be the case if the subject is unable to metabolize glucose because of having plenty of free fatty acids in the blood?

I can see your point in the danger of investing pure fructose, bacterial outgrowth would be a major concern.

Perhaps vitamin E - to protect against free fatty acids, aspirin against its metabolites, niacinamide against lipolysis, will allow glucose to be metabolized, thereby allowing it to help fructose absorption.
idk to what degree fructose can substitute glucose. hast anyone asked ray what percent of carb could be fructose? i would love to know...

and glucose itself is the best FFA suppressor i believe, insulin in fact.

also a calm nervous system can lower FFA because it lowers adrenaline and cortisol.

also

free fatty acids | Ray Peat Forum

ffa | Ray Peat Forum
 

yerrag

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But i read that not every type of cells can burn fructose.

I thought though that glucose is turned into fructose before it is converted to pyruvate on the pathway of either glycolysis or oxidative metabolism. Having fructose sidesteps the processing of glucose into fructose.
 

paymanz

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I thought though that glucose is turned into fructose before it is converted to pyruvate on the pathway of either glycolysis or oxidative metabolism. Having fructose sidesteps the processing of glucose into fructose.
i never heard that , please let me know if you found any reference for that.
 

yerrag

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i never heard that , please let me know if you found any reference for that.

I've read it once or twice, and wished I'd bookmarked it. This happens when I've been reading too many things. Will let you know when I find something.
 
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Sugar issues( Glucose and sucrose for diabetes):
"One of the points at which fatty acids suppress the use of glucose is at the point at which it is converted into fructose, in the process of glycolysis. When fructose is available, it can by-pass this barrier to the use of glucose, and continue to provide pyruvic acid for continuing oxidative metabolism, and if the mitochondria themselves aren't providing sufficient energy, it can leave the cell as lactate, allowing continuing glycolytic energy production. In the brain, this can sustain life in an emergency."
 

yerrag

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Sugar issues( Glucose and sucrose for diabetes):
"One of the points at which fatty acids suppress the use of glucose is at the point at which it is converted into fructose, in the process of glycolysis. When fructose is available, it can by-pass this barrier to the use of glucose, and continue to provide pyruvic acid for continuing oxidative metabolism, and if the mitochondria themselves aren't providing sufficient energy, it can leave the cell as lactate, allowing continuing glycolytic energy production. In the brain, this can sustain life in an emergency."
Thanks Rafael! It is even in an article often referred to.
 
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You're welcome! Peat's articles have so much information that sometimes it can be hard to find something we read in them :)
 

yerrag

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Sugar issues( Glucose and sucrose for diabetes):
"One of the points at which fatty acids suppress the use of glucose is at the point at which it is converted into fructose, in the process of glycolysis. When fructose is available, it can by-pass this barrier to the use of glucose, and continue to provide pyruvic acid for continuing oxidative metabolism, and if the mitochondria themselves aren't providing sufficient energy, it can leave the cell as lactate, allowing continuing glycolytic energy production. In the brain, this can sustain life in an emergency."
This doesn't necessarily mean glucose turns into fructose, but that I think it means that where glucose turns into fructose 6-phosphate is where the fatty acids block the conversion, whereas fructose being converted to fructose 6-phosphate isn't blocked by fatty acids.

So, I was wrong in how I recalled it earlier.
 

yerrag

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It sure is hard to find fructose from either beets or cane sugar. Maybe they're out there, but going to British, German, and Italian sites of Amazon, the fructose I can find is not labeled in such a way that you could tell whether it came from corn, cane, or beets.

But I found this table the Food Intolerance Network, and it lists the fructose/glucose ratio of agave at 4.5, and of pear at 2.6. So, I think my work's done now.

I could have maltose (100%glucose), honey or cane sugar (50-50), pear (75-25 ), and agave (82-18) to choose from to make a custom blend to fit a certain glucose-fructose ratio. A diabetic on a high-carb low fat therapeutic diet would be able to find the right blend that suits him from among the mentioned sugars.

I can give up on the difficult and frustrating search for non-allergenic fructose from cane sugar or beets.
 

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yerrag

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Dr. Peat replied to me today-

Me: I have been searching good allergen-free fructose and have given up, All are made from corn. Instead, I've decided on using instead agave syrup and pear juice, as they have 80% and 70% fructose respectively. I was hoping to run a few tests on myself first, and see how my glucose tolerance test would look like with agave, pear juice, regular cane sugar, and white rice. Then, I'd like to test the use on some friends who are diabetic, and see how they respond. Would agave be a good replacement for pure fructose?

Ray: A problem with apples and pears is their pectin content, which can potentially cause bowel inflammation. The high temperature necessary to concentrate the agave fluid (called aguamiel before it’s fermented into pulque) into a sort of molasses causes a Maillard reaction, producing toxins, but I don’t think that product is sold in the US. The “agave nectar” that’s sold in the US is made from the core of the plant, rather than the juice, so it's a very artificial industrial product, and it’s risky in a variety of ways, including allergens.

And so, my plan to use agave is gone. As for pear, I looked up pectin and pectin isn't removed during juicing. So, my plan to use pear juice is shot as well.

Every product so far that's pure or high in fructose is allergenic.

Would need to keep looking for fructose from cane sugar and from sugar beet.
 

yerrag

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Sugar issues( Glucose and sucrose for diabetes):
"One of the points at which fatty acids suppress the use of glucose is at the point at which it is converted into fructose, in the process of glycolysis. When fructose is available, it can by-pass this barrier to the use of glucose, and continue to provide pyruvic acid for continuing oxidative metabolism, and if the mitochondria themselves aren't providing sufficient energy, it can leave the cell as lactate, allowing continuing glycolytic energy production. In the brain, this can sustain life in an emergency."

I was looking up the enzyme aldose reductase, Aldose reductase - Wikipedia, and lo and behold, it touches on glucose being converted to fructose in the polyol pathway, in which glucose is converted to sorbitol, with NADPH and aldose reductase enzyme, in the first step; and in the second step, sorbitol is converted to fructose with sorbitol dehydrogenase enzyme. The polyol pathway does not involve the use of ATP.

Since this is a wikipedia entry, this article has to be taken with a grain of salt. I don't see why the use of the polyol pathway has to do with diabetes. If the pathway produces fructose and fructose is more readily absorbed and metabolized that glucose, it doesn't seem right to implicate the pathway that produces fructose with diabetes. Yet this is what it says:

Diabetes mellitus is recognized as a leading cause of new cases of blindness, and is associated with increased risk for painful neuropathy, heart disease and kidney failure. Many theories have been advanced to explain mechanisms leading to diabetic complications, including stimulation of glucose metabolism by the polyol pathway. Additionally, the enzyme is located in the eye (cornea, retina, lens), kidney, and the myelin sheath–tissues that are often involved in diabetic complications.[13] Under normal glycemic conditions, only a small fraction of glucose is metabolized through the polyol pathway, as the majority is phosphorylated by hexokinase, and the resulting product, glucose-6-phosphate, is utilized as a substrate for glycolysis or pentose phosphate metabolism.[14][15]ever, in response to the chronic hyperglycemia found in diabetics, glucose flux through the polyol pathway is significantly increased. Up to 33% of total glucose utilization in some tissues can be through the polyol pathway.[16] Glucose concentrations are often elevated in diabeticsand aldose reductase has long been believed to be responsible for diabetiic complications involving a number of organs.

Yet this entry is followed by the acknowledgment that various aldose reductase inhibitors have been tried, and these don't do squat:

Many aldose reductase inhibitors have been developed as drug candidates but virtually all have failed although some such as epalrestat are commercially available in several countries. Additional reductase inhibitors such as ranirestat, ponalrestat, rinalrestat, risarestat, sorbinil, and berberine[17] are currently in clinical trials.[18]
 
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I was looking up the enzyme aldose reductase, Aldose reductase - Wikipedia, and lo and behold, it touches on glucose being converted to fructose in the polyol pathway, in which glucose is converted to sorbitol, with NADPH and aldose reductase enzyme, in the first step; and in the second step, sorbitol is converted to fructose with sorbitol dehydrogenase enzyme. The polyol pathway does not involve the use of ATP.

Since this is a wikipedia entry, this article has to be taken with a grain of salt. I don't see why the use of the polyol pathway has to do with diabetes. If the pathway produces fructose and fructose is more readily absorbed and metabolized that glucose, it doesn't seem right to implicate the pathway that produces fructose with diabetes. Yet this is what it says:

Diabetes mellitus is recognized as a leading cause of new cases of blindness, and is associated with increased risk for painful neuropathy, heart disease and kidney failure. Many theories have been advanced to explain mechanisms leading to diabetic complications, including stimulation of glucose metabolism by the polyol pathway. Additionally, the enzyme is located in the eye (cornea, retina, lens), kidney, and the myelin sheath–tissues that are often involved in diabetic complications.[13] Under normal glycemic conditions, only a small fraction of glucose is metabolized through the polyol pathway, as the majority is phosphorylated by hexokinase, and the resulting product, glucose-6-phosphate, is utilized as a substrate for glycolysis or pentose phosphate metabolism.[14][15]ever, in response to the chronic hyperglycemia found in diabetics, glucose flux through the polyol pathway is significantly increased. Up to 33% of total glucose utilization in some tissues can be through the polyol pathway.[16] Glucose concentrations are often elevated in diabeticsand aldose reductase has long been believed to be responsible for diabetiic complications involving a number of organs.

Yet this entry is followed by the acknowledgment that various aldose reductase inhibitors have been tried, and these don't do squat:

Many aldose reductase inhibitors have been developed as drug candidates but virtually all have failed although some such as epalrestat are commercially available in several countries. Additional reductase inhibitors such as ranirestat, ponalrestat, rinalrestat, risarestat, sorbinil, and berberine[17] are currently in clinical trials.[18]
I seems that they are trying to blame fructose for the complications of diabetes, which is insane, since it has been shown to lower AGE's, improve CO2 production, lower glycemia, etc. It just shows how far from the truth most people are. They have to resort to unfounded assumptions to explain something that in reality is much more straightforward. And the fact that aldolase reductase inhibitors showed no benefit just adds more proof against the "sugar is bad" theory. This is just like the "DHT causes balding" premiss: they say that androgens cause alopecia, but when they found that there are men with lower than normal levels of androgens that nonetheless are balding, they call it a paradox.
 

yerrag

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There is much hate towards fructose in the medical establishment. It's implicated also in high uric acid, along with the idea that uric acid is bad, without consideration for its place as part of the body's primary antioxidants.

And it's easy for the establishment lynch mob to use HFCS in its attack on fructose. Taking pure fructose may not be a good idea, but you'll have to try real hard to find it in a pure form. Yet it is the form they base studies on, in which they put fructose in a bad light. And they use large quantities of it as well. And we know it such quantities, dosage is the poison. As in anything--even water.

btw the polyol pathway, where fructose is made from glucose, isn't much discussed at all. This was why earlier in the thread we had difficulty with finding finding such a pathway exists. We only had Peat's word that glucose turns into fructose on the way to glycolysis, but it's good to know it exists in the polyol pathway.
 
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