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Harvard Creates Batteries Using Quinones And Riboflavin

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Jul 21, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    I am posting this simply because I thought it is a cool study that illustrates the electrical versatility of electron withdrawing agents like the quinones, riboflavin, and even NAD.

    Harvard's battery tech takes cues from vitamin B2

    "...A team of Harvard scientists on a quest to find an organic molecule that can be used to make non-toxic, low cost flow batteries found their answer in vitamin B2. By making just a couple of tweaks to riboflavin's original molecule, which converts carbs to fuel in our bodies, they were able to design one that can be used to store energy harnessed by solar and wind sources. The same team previously worked on a battery that uses a type of organic molecule called quinones and ferrocyanide (a food additive) instead of typical electrolyte. They decided to find other molecules that could lead to a version with better capacity, however, and were inspired by B2's capabilities."

    As a side note, the riboflavin-derivative they came up with is a powerful adenosine (A1) "receptor" antagonist. I did some searching, and it looks like riboflavin itself is an adenosine antagonist, so this would explain the insomnia and hyperactivity people have reported from high doses of riboflavin. It also suggest riboflavin in high doses is functionally dopaminergic, much like caffeine.
    Riboflavin: Inhibitory Effects on Receptors, G-Proteins, and Adenylate Cyclase. - PubMed - NCBI

    "...Riboflavin at low micromolar concentrations appears to have three possibly interrelated effects on second messenger systems subserved by G-proteins. These are antagonism at A(1)-adenosine receptors, inhibition of turnover of guanyl nucleotides at G-proteins, and inhibition of adenylate cyclase."
     
  2. Pointless

    Pointless Member

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    Aspirin is supposed to revive dead car batteries.
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Interesting! Do you have a link to share?
     
  4. Pointless

    Pointless Member

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    It's just an Internet rumor. I was reading about aspirin and hair loss prevention through pgd2 inhibition and a cheesy article said "Did you know? Aspirin can charge dead car batteries???" I Google'd it but nothing substantial came up, just some people in forums claiming it works.
     
  5. Koveras

    Koveras Member

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    Renewable-emodin-based wearable supercapacitors. - PubMed - NCBI

    Nanoscale. 2017 Jan 13. doi: 10.1039/c6nr09190c. [Epub ahead of print]
    Renewable-emodin-based wearable supercapacitors.
    Hu P1, Chen T2, Yang Y1, Wang H1, Luo Z1, Yang J1, Fu H1, Guo L1.

    With the increasing dependency of human life on wearable electronics, the development of corresponding energy-storage devices is being insensitively pursued. Considering the special usage locations of wearable energy-storage devices, the safety and non-toxicity of electrode materials adopted should be of concern. In this work, a novel all-solid-state wearable supercapacitor based on the renewable-biomolecule emodin, naturally derivable from traditional Chinese herbal rhubarb or Polygonum cuspidatum, was successfully fabricated. Such supercapacitors exhibited excellent charge storage and rate capability with great flexibility and could be integrated into wearable electronics. As a proof of concept, a strap-shaped supercapacitor was fabricated, and it was capable of powering an electronic watch. Our work will promote the development of safe wearable electronics.
     
  6. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    People still doubt the electronic properties of the organism
    You can literally make capacitors with a quinone that also kills cancer cells
     
  7. Wolf

    Wolf Member

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    But qi, vital energy, and other similar concepts are bull****.
     
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