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Hard-boiled Eggs, Harmful?

Discussion in 'Eggs' started by Logan-, Jun 27, 2018.

  1. Logan-

    Logan- Member

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    I cook medium sized organic eggs for 12 minutes in a boiling water. Does that make the egg yolk in any way harmful to human body? I eat two egg yolks every day.

    The reason I am eating it hard-boiled is because I am allergic to egg whites; and if I boil the eggs less, than I cannot successfully separate all the egg whites from the yolk.
     
  2. biggirlkisss

    biggirlkisss Member

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    depends on how u response to it
     
  3. raypeatclips

    raypeatclips Member

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    No. Have you tried cracking the shell and allow the white to run out of the whole, the yolk too big to escape the gap? That's how I do it. I've also cracked an egg into my fingers and allow the white to run through, while holding the yolk in my fingers but that's a much messier way.
     
  4. OP
    Logan-

    Logan- Member

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    By saying "No", do you mean cooking the eggs for 12 minutes does not make the egg yolk harmful for human consumption in any way?

    Regarding your suggestion, I understand what you are saying and know the method; but I think that method doesn't allow the egg white to be completely separated from the egg yolk. Some egg white remains. But, even if that wasn't the case, how do you eat the yolk after that? Do you cook it afterwards, or drink it raw?
     
  5. raypeatclips

    raypeatclips Member

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    I don't think it would change it much, compared to say half the cooking. Why not try hard boil for around 6 minutes so the yolk is runny and the white is solid? I find egg yolks this way most delicious.

    You are right, the way I do it, a tiny bit of white sometimes remains, sometimes not. I am not allergic to white though just dislike them.
     
  6. OP
    Logan-

    Logan- Member

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    I just tried your suggestion. Didn't work. The problem is, some sticky half liquid half solid egg white remains on the yolk; and it is not possible to seperate it completely. Twelve minutes is the minimum amount I can cook them to be able to completely separate the white from the yolk. I tried to boil them for ten, even eleven minutes before with failure.
     
  7. dbh25

    dbh25 Member

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  8. OP
    Logan-

    Logan- Member

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    Do eggs really cause high cholesterol?
    [​IMG]
    Steven Fowkes
    , 3-time tester of eggs using cholesterol testing from the Stanford Blood Center
    Answered Feb 26 2015 · Author has 645 answers and 1.3m answer views
    If you mean "Will eggs raise my cholesterol," likely yes, and possibly no. For me, eating lots of eggs lowers my cholesterol (220>180) because my liver over-corrects for a lack of dietary cholesterol. I did the experiment three times because I did not believe it the first time. But other people (the majority?) may under-correct and have cholesterol rise slightly from dietary cholesterol intake. This effect is tiny, and transitory.

    But if you mean "is my high cholesterol caused by eating eggs," very likely not. Your body has homeostatic mechanisms that set the level of cholesterol, and these operate for specific purposes. Regulation of membrane stability and permeability, to give two examples. The egg cholesterol itself is not likely to be a factor.

    But if you are allergic to eggs, or reactive to the high sulfur (cysteine, methionine) of egg protein, or over-cook your eggs (hard boil, over-hard, i.e., a hard, not liquid yolk), you body's set point for cholesterol could go up significantly. But these are also mechanisms that apply to eating hard-gluten wheat, homogenized milk, yeast, corn (regular, popped or fried), barbecued meat, bread crust, fried corn, popped corn, egg whites (!), meat (fish, poultry, ruminants), and PUFA-rich vegetable-oil-fried anything. And more.

    Blood cholesterol is a very small health risk factor. Oxidized and peroxidized cholesterol matters much more. So does lack of sulfation of cholesterol. And fatty acid peroxides and hydroperoxides. Vitamin C (the most common deficiency affecting collagen infrastructure of arteries and capillaries). But getting these things measured outside of a research laboratory is a problem. So I've stopped paying attention to cholesterol data, in favor of anything affecting cardiovascular integrity, mostly factors affecting collagen quality and lipid rancidity.

    There are other questions and answers of Quora that you might find interesting on this and closely related topics.
    1.6k Views · View Upvoters
     
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