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Goitrogenic Fruits?

Discussion in 'Diet' started by Nicholas, Jun 1, 2015.

  1. Nicholas

    Nicholas Member

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    hello - i get about 50% of my carbs from whole fruits on a 2900-3000 calorie diet where carbs are about 60% of my calories. because of this, i feel the need to have a lot of variety. i eat cherries, grapes, kiwi, pears, peaches, papaya, watermelon, and occasional honeydew and oranges and plums (it's really hard to find good tasting honeydews and watermelons so it would be nice to not buy these anymore - as 1 out of 3 will always be a dud).

    i read that peaches and pears were goitrogenic, but was curious if others have any input on the truth of that. i eat 1-2 peaches a day and 1 pear a day. and if they are both goitrogenic, do you think the rest of my fruits is enough nutritional variety along with all the nutrients in raw milk, liver, shellfish, aged cheese, etc?
     
  2. narouz

    narouz Member

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    I did read one study showing that grapes contain some--maybe pretty small--amount
    of some goitrogen (name I can't remember).
    I couldn't take it too seriously...it was just one study.
    I eat grapes.

    I believe avocados are categorized as a fruit.
    But Peat says they are practically heptatoxic,
    I think because of the PUFA.
    So...anti-metabolic, if not strictly goitrogenic.
     
  3. OP
    Nicholas

    Nicholas Member

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    so in other words, not goitrogenic like broccoli?
     
  4. narouz

    narouz Member

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    Yeah, I think so.
    I think the PUFA content of avocados makes them anti-metabolic,
    which includes an anti-thyroid effect.
    But not in the same way as the goitrogens in broccoli, cabbage, turnip greens, etc.
     
  5. OP
    Nicholas

    Nicholas Member

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    ok, thank you
     
  6. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    The antithyroid effect of certain foods in man as determined with radioactiv iodid

    "The degree of inhibition of iodine uptake was arbitrarily graded in the
    following manner:
    1. No inhibition. The course of the iodine accumulation did not deviate significantly from prediction.
    2. Slight or questionable depression of the rate of uptake.
    3. Moderate deviation from prediction but without complete inhibition.
    4. Complete inhibition of the iodine uptake but for less than four hours.
    5. Complete inhibition of uptake lasting more than four but less than twenty-four hours.
    6. Complete inhibition of the iodine uptake lasting twenty-four hours."
    When not specified, the quantity is in grams.

    upload_2018-8-19_9-0-27.png

    upload_2018-8-19_9-0-36.png

    upload_2018-8-19_9-0-56.png

    "28.4 gm. of sodium chloride were given orally with no demonstrable depression of the iodine uptake [keep in mind that subjects were as healthy as Waynish]. This result indicated that any possible displacement of iodide by the chloride ion had no significance in our tests as no meal given had a salt content which approached this amount. Since three liters of water would have to be drunk by this subject to maintain isotonicity of the body fluids, this test also indicated the lack of inhibition by a large, inert fluid intake."

    "Because several observers (Remington, 1937, Hou, 1940) have indicated that liver may be a potent goitrogen in the rat, this substance was tested in man also. As yet only one such test has been made. One pound of broiled beef liver gave evidence of a definite, though slight, thyroid inhibition."

    "Although rutabaga had the strongest antithyroid effect, activity was by no means limited to the Cruciferae. Among the Rosaceae, for instance, pears, strawberries, and peaches seemed to be quite active. Whether the material responsible for this effect was the same in each instance or whether, as seems more likely, different compounds were responsible in different foods can only be answered by the isolation and indentification of the active principle in each case."

    "It is curious that the activity of some foods, e.g. rutabaga and pears, seemed to be destroyed by cooking while the activity of others, such as peas and peanuts, was unaffected by heat. Since the antithyroid ingredient seemed to be water soluble, perhaps the heating of some of these foods in water extracted a good proportion of the activity. The cooking juices were usually not eaten in these tests so the material ingested may have thus lost a good deal of its inhibiting power. Peanuts, on the other hand, were roasted and there was therefore no opportunity for the activity to be extracted."

    "A pertinent question is whether the iodine content of the active foods contributed to the depressed rate of accumulation of radioactive iodine. Tests with various doses of potassium iodide have shown that approximately 1 mg. would be required to induce a perceptible effect. Although the iodine content of the foods used in these experiments was not determined, the extensive literature on the subject indicates that most of the test meals were very low in iodine. The sea foods were an exception and the values quoted by McClendon (1939) indicate that several milligrams of iodine may have been present. The fact that positive effects were observed only with raw oysters and clams might indicate that the iodine present in the other sea foods was not in the form of iodide or not in a form which was readily available for absorption by the thyroid. Another possibility, that boiling might leach out the iodide from the sea food, has already been mentioned."

    "Raw oysters and raw clams also depressed the iodine uptake. No other seafood tested showed any such inhibition. While it is possible that the depression of the accumulation gradient by oysters and clams may have been due to the high-iodine content they are known to possess, the absence of activity from the other iodine-rich seafood is difficult to correlate with such an hypothesis. It is possible, of course, that boiling a marine animal will leach out enough iodine to reduce the concentration of this element below an effective level. In line with this thought, it might be noted that the oysters and clams were the only ocean residents eaten raw."

    Milk also had an effect, so I guess such foods can be ignored.

    "Of course, the amount of food consumed in the above experiments was unphysiologically large in most instances. However, some foods, such as peanuts, rutabagas, and filberts, exerted an inhibition when relatively small quantities were eaten."

    "Since there are many people who habitually consume considerable amounts of foods that have been found to possess activity and who do not develop goiters, a marked variation in the response to goitrogenic stimuli probably exists. Clinical experience has shown this to be the case in the requirements for antithyroid medication in thyrotoxicosis."

    "Probably there is a good deal of variation in the potency of foods at different times also. Webster (1932) reported that the goitrogenic activity of cabbage obtained from the same source became much more marked with the approach of the winter months."

    "The antithyroid material consumed by the vast majority of people eating such foods would probably not be sufficient to have any visible effect on the thyroid. Only if the major portion of one's dietary intake were limited to goitrogens would thyroid hyperplasia be likely to result. However, under conditions of iodine deficiency, the added stimulus of goitrogenic food might produce hyperplasia in a thyroid gland which was just able to produce sufficient hormone to satisfy the metabolic requirements of the body, while still retaining its normal size."
     
  7. Rafael Lao Wai

    Rafael Lao Wai Member

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    Thanks for this, Amazonic!
     
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